Nixie-Marine News & Views
17 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Alan B. Sielen | How to Fight Oceanic Destruction | Foreign Affairs

Alan B. Sielen | How to Fight Oceanic Destruction | Foreign Affairs | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
The oceans of studies on dying seas have done nothing to stop their devastation.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

Foreign Affairs has published a useful summary of key issues relating to the care of our oceans.  For those of us already involved, it is not particularly new information, BUT it does highlight the fundamental barrier to improvements -- political will.

 

If Foreign Affairs features this as a main concern, then it  I'd argue it's been a long time coming and now at crisis stage. The need to engage, inform and act on ocean and marine education is obvious.  However, the policy and legal suggestions made here will be new for many who are not actively involved in ocean policy or marine protection.  For that reason, this is a useful read and can provide some guide posts for next steps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Marine Conservation - Song Saa Foundation

Marine Conservation - Song Saa Foundation | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
The Song Saa Foundation is working hard to protect the Koh Rong marine area through conservation, education and research initiatives.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

The Song Saa Foundation is a relatively new organisation that seeks to protect a very precious ecosystem, the Koh Rong Archipelago.  The Foundation works to support the local community to protect its environment while creating sustainable livelihoods and enabling education for current and future generations.

 

I'm definitely predisposed to respect this programme of work as the executive Director is Dr. Wayne McCallum, one of my former doctoral students, but in all honesty I would think this is a pretty impressive Foundation without having that connection.  Why?  Because this is about bringing the environment, local people, education and economics together to genuinely seek a sustainable community.

 

Check out the website -- it's worth the time.  And, if you really like it do contact Wayne to find out how you can do more to help local conservation by donating your time or money.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Welcome to whalesong.net

Welcome to whalesong.net | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
www.whalesong.net - The Whalesong Project
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

The WhaleSong Project is the passion of a single man who brings us a live broadcast of the whales off the coast of Maui.  This is a labour of love and commitment made possible by modern technology and the absolute passion and commitment of one man (and his supporters).

 

The whalesongs are totally free to listen to - he used his life savings to make this available - and the purpose is to allow people right around the world to hear the unique and special songs of the whales.

 

If you haven't heard whalesong before. I recommend that you do so. There's nothing like it -- it draws you in and, for many, creates a connection they never thought was possible. For those who have heard whale song before, here's another opportunity.  And, when the whales are present in waters off Maui, it's broadcast live.  How amazing is that?

 

Go on, check it out. You know you want to.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Osa Peninsula marine protected area sought in Costa Rica ...

Osa Peninsula marine protected area sought in Costa Rica ... | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
The southern Pacific Ocean off the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica is an amazing natural wonder of marine biodiversity, home to more than 25 species of dolphins and whales, four of the world's eight different sea turtles, along with manta rays,...
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

Living in New Zealand's South Island, less than an hour's drive from a wonderful Marine Reserve in Akaroa Harbour, I am always interested to hear about local efforts to create new Marine Reserves or Protected Areas.   And, given that the current New Zealand Government has proposed deep sea oil drilling within the Marine Reserve, I am also interested to understand the motivations behind Reserves -- and whether they really are a form of protection.

 

This blog post provides a helpful set of information about an initiative to create a Marine Protected Area (slightly different than a Reserve) in the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica.  This area has an incredibly rich marine biodiversity and some of the most significant warm water updrafts globally.  A Marine Protected Area is a good idea, to address over fishing as well as to secure increased understanding about the significance of the area.

 

There's still work to do to secure the conservation outcomes, but it will be an interesting effort to watch -- or you can join in by signing the linked petitions or helping to crowd fund the locals' efforts.  So, do check out the blog site.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Marine Turtle Population Continues To Be Threatened: Legal Harvest Alone ... - iScienceTimes.com

Marine Turtle Population Continues To Be Threatened: Legal Harvest Alone ... - iScienceTimes.com | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
iScienceTimes.com
Marine Turtle Population Continues To Be Threatened: Legal Harvest Alone ...
iScienceTimes.com
Recently efforts of protectionists and conservationists has led to greater protection of marine turtles, but that may not be enough.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

Sea Turtles are an ancient creature. having lived on Earth for over 100 million years.  All species are endangered - even with increased conservation efforts there remains a need to be hyper-vigilant.

 

Coastal and local communities sometimes contribute to the ongoing threats by harvesting turtle eggs and sea turtles.  Doing so may be based on traditional harvest practices, poverty or the need to provide protein in food scarce environments.

 

Rather than condemn local communities, there is a need to work more closely with them to determine the reasons for taking and using the sea turtles and their eggs.  Understanding the drivers can lead to mutually beneficial solutions, whereby local communities can both help to protect the endangered species and secure livelihoods, food and other needs.

 

As such there is an increasing need to bring together science, social science and justice frameworks not only to protect these incredible marine creatures, but to ensure that future generations of local, coastal communities can experience what their ancestors held special and, often, sacred.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

We Need a Global Conservation Agreement for the High Seas (Op-Ed)

We Need a Global Conservation Agreement for the High Seas (Op-Ed) | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
The high seas cover about 50% of Earth’s surface and host a major share of the world’s biodiversity, but remain largely ungoverned. With increasing threats to open ocean ecosystems, now more than ever we need a high seas conservation agreement.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

As we learn more about our oceans, including its significance in climate change adaptation and mitigation, we will need to consider and assess the extent to which current policies, laws and institutions are fit-for-purpose.  The need to consider context, values and integration will be essential - not things policy makers have always taken into account.

 

This Op-Ed provides an example of what we need to consider - High Seas Law and how new technologies, increased human needs, food security and waste will all impact on our oceans.  I understand that the UN wishes to use current, and long standing international law like the Law of the Sea, as the guiding legal framework, but there may come a time where slightly different approaches will be required.  Current legal scholars, marine biologists, conservationists, policy designers and local communities need to work together to consider what the best options are -- and the outcomes that are required.

 

We'll hear more about this as the UN approaches its final negotiating stage, but that shouldn't stop each of us finding out more -- and asking our Governments if and how they are involved in these discussions. 

 

Do you know your country's position?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Plane Search Shows World’s Oceans Are Full of Trash

Plane Search Shows World’s Oceans Are Full of Trash | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
By Laura Parker Before Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went missing, sea trash was not a global headliner. Via: National Geographic
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

While the volumes of rubbish in  the sea may be new to many readers of this article, it's not new to those who spend time in, on or near the sea.  Rubbish is omnipresent and there are beach clean-ups right around the world due to the ongoing distribution and redistribution of our global waste.

 

The item that is increasingly damaging and finds its way into marine mammals, fishes and birds alike is plastic.  It is large, medium, small and nano in scale and seems to find its way into every nook and cranny.

 

Read more to find out about some aspects of the great ocean rubbish dumps and how the great gyres help create them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Whales win one: Will Japan abide by ban?

Whales win one: Will Japan abide by ban? | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
A world court banned Japan's bogus "scientific" whaling. Carl Safina wonders if it be the end of Japan's hunting for whale meat.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

Carl Safina once again provides an insightful assessment of recent events - this time about the International Court of Justice's decision against Japan's so-called "scientific whaling programme."

 

The decision was a victory and should be celebrated.  At the same time, whaling continues in other parts of the ocean's and serious questions remain as to what Japan will do next. Commentators have suggested Japan will quietly ease out of whaling, partly because whale meat sales continue to decline.  Others suggest they will continue in other parts of the oceans and that they may revisit how they can engage in Southern Ocean whaling outside the parameters of the legal decision.

 

For those of us who believe that the health of the oceans are partly tied to the health and well being of the cetaceans and other marine creatures in the oceans, there remains the need to maintain vigilance and activity.

 

Carl Safina's continued leadership will make an important contribution to our oceans' health and wellbeing -- and hence our own health and wellbeing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Rixecker
Scoop.it!

Injured sea turtle? Just print a splint! - Phys.org

Injured sea turtle? Just print a splint! - Phys.org | Nixie-Marine News & Views | Scoop.it
Injured sea turtles are a fairly common sight along the North Carolina coast. Fortunately ... Augie, an endangered green sea turtle with a severe flipper injury, is one animal that has benefitted from innovation.
Stefanie Rixecker's insight:

So often we hear bad news stories about new technologies.  Really, technologies can be put to good or ill; it's up to humkind to determine what's appropriate and which risks we are prepared to accept.  Hence, the importance of ethics and each of us still being actively engaged local and global citizens.

 

In this example, an injured sea turtle receives a personally designed splint - using 3D technologies - which ultimately helps it heal and ,significantly, helps it heal well enough to provide the greatest chance for its survival in the wild.

 

Yes, there are likely to be risks or side-effects to the technology and/or its use.  At first glance, it looks like it's doing some good -- benefitting endangered species conservation.  Let's keep an eye on it to see how it evolves and what more we can learn from its use.

more...
No comment yet.