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BBC - Radio 4 - Training the Vets

BBC - Radio 4 - Training the Vets | Veterinary News | Scoop.it
Graham Easton talks to veterinary students at Liverpool University...

Via Sophie Boorman
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At this day and age Veterinaries don’t have the same responsibilities that they did a few years ago. A couple of years ago they were required to know how to clone animals. Now, it’s more common for them to specialize in these areas or be considered a politician or an animal doctor. Some work for the government controlling livestock and the others spend their days taking care of kitty cats and the doggies of neighborhoods. Graham Easton leads us down the paths of a couple of vets studying at the University of Liverpool to allow us to experience what they do. The only way we get exposed to the vets that work for the government is through television now that the whole meat crisis has arisen. The government doesn’t contract vets like this to ensure that the meat of their cows and sheep are healthy enough to eat, they employ them to save their industries. The other half of the vets that don’t work for the government, choose to live their lives spaying cats and treating the fleas on dogs. Now that animals are becoming more and more important in people’s lives it’s important to have someone to care for the animals to ensure that they live a long and healthy life with their owners. Should the government pay for the education of only the vets intending to work for the government or all of the vets no matter where they plan to work afterwards? Vet schools are struggling to pay for clinical training because they don’t receive enough aid from the government while other doctor’s receive so much money. Six UK schools have been trying to reconcile the very different branches of Veterinaries. 

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Euthansia can be a tough choice for pet owners - Farm and Dairy

Euthansia can be a tough choice for pet owners - Farm and Dairy | Veterinary News | Scoop.it
Euthansia can be a tough choice for pet owners
Farm and Dairy
The University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine has a student-run telephone service called the CARE Pet Loss Helpline. The number is 217-244-2273, or 877-394-2273.

Via Christie Bernier
Aressa Silva's insight:

Cheryl Weber from the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Urbana, talks about how you know if Euthanasia is the best choice for your animals. The first thing to do is get a diagnosis of the animal. She says that understanding the pet’s condition is very important. A loyal vet will explain the diagnoses of the animal and indicate any treatment option available. They will also be able to evaluate the pain and suffering the animals is going through. There may be some change in your pet’s behavior such as not eating or drinking or less mobility. These may be reasons that your pet’s quality of life is not the same that it has always been. When the pet’s life is coming to an end, Weber recommends spending as much time possible with the pet. Planning ahead is crucial, especially if Euthanasia would be the best choice for your pet. Don’t allow that to suffer any longer for your pleasure. You may pick the desired vet to complete this procedure. The choice between Home Euthanasia is also crucial to create less stress for your pet. They can be cremated or buried and the owners can choice to either be present or just receive the pet later after everything has been completed. Although losing an animal may not seem like a big deal to you, it could be to somebody else. Losing an animal is just as painful as losing a family member. 

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Christie Bernier's curator insight, February 2, 2014 3:07 PM

Good suggestions for a tough decision.

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video - Only Your Pet Doctor Knows Best |

video - Only Your Pet Doctor Knows Best | | Veterinary News | Scoop.it

A pet doctor is your pet’s best bet for a healthy, pain-free life. Pet behavior expert Steve Dale is alarmed at the drop in visits our pets are making to their veterinarian. While there are so many products that were once available only through veterinarians, and are now available in retail stores and online, there is no replacing the expert advice and hands on approach you get through regular exams from your veterinarian.

Steve gets advice from Dr. Tony Rumschlag about the importance of talking with your veterinarian about flea infestations, dog vaccinations, and pain that our aging pets are facing. Dr. Robin Downing tells us why pain management is so important for healthy golden years for our pets that an online vet cannot properly address without a hands-on examination.


Via Isabelle clere Escouteloup, Tracey Lee Davis
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Reported by Steve Dale, there has been an incredible drop in the amount of people that actually take their pets to the vet regularly. At one point in time there were some medications that were only available through veterinary prescriptions, but now, these medications are available to the public in retail stores or online. Being able to care for your pet yourself is great, but nothing beats expert opinion. Certain medications, depending on the type or size of pet, may not be the best choice. Regular Veterinary visits are not made only for sick pets. Just like humans, animals need to go in for a regular check-up. It is recommended that the pet visit the vet at least twice a year for their regular check-up. Dr. Tony Rumschlag emphasizes the importance of bringing your pet to the vet regularly. There are many dogs that, at one point in their life, will have fleas. Depending on the dog and what medication it is taking, the places that this dog attends, and the flea medication that they have taken before, the over the counter medication may not work. You may need to seek expert opinion. Vets will also help you know when your older pets are in pain. They understand that pets living in pain mean that it’s harder for them to live and they aren’t leaving a healthy life. If you care for your animals and want them around for a while, keep their check ups regular and don’t just give them any brand of the desired medications. 

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Loyal dog continues to attend mass at church where owner’s funeral was held

Loyal dog continues to attend mass at church where owner’s funeral was held | Veterinary News | Scoop.it
A loyal dog whose owner died late last year has apparently been showing up for mass every day for the last two months at the church where the funeral was held .

Via Sophie Boorman
Aressa Silva's insight:

In San Donaci, Italy, a dog still attends Santa Maria Assunta church even after his beloved owner’s funeral. He has been attending mass for currently two months now. Tommy, a 7 year-old German Shepard was very used to attending mass with his owner, Maria Margherita Lochi and was allowed to sit at her feet. When Lochi passed away, Tommy attended the funeral just like every mourning friend and family member and escorted the coffin into the church. He didn’t leave her side one bit. Tommy, who was adopted by Lochi as a stray doesn’t miss one day at church. As soon as the bell rings to mark the beginning of the church service, he shows up to sit in his special seat. Everyone adores Tommy. They feed him and still allow him to join mass since he is a very quiet and well behaved dog. Dogs are very loyal animals. This is not the first time something like this has happened. In 2011 a Labrador retriever laid down next to his owner’s casket, a fallen Navy Seal, at his funeral in Rockford, Iowa. He refused to leave his owner’s side. A 60 year-old man once fell through thin ice and his dog sat and watching anxiously for thirty minutes as the fire department rescued his beloved owner. Dogs are known to e very loyal. They have feelings and if they are close to someone they will be loyal their whole life and even after their owner’s life ends. 

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Farmers and responsible use of veterinary medicines

Nico Verduin, a Dutch farmer from LTO, explains how he ensures that veterinary medicines are responsibly used at his sheep farm.

Via maxime chevalier
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In the Netherlands, the chairman of the sheep farmers at LTO Dutch Federation of Agriculture and Horticulture believe in using medication on their animals but only ones that are approved by their vets. They believe that working close with their vets will ensure the responsible use of the medications on their animals. Their main goal is to make healthy animals to ensure their children will be healthy eating this meat. They believe that having their own children eat their products proves that they are very responsible in the way that their animals are raised and medicated. They ensure that they have all of the records of the medication kept on computers and hard copy, and they only buy the medications from their most trusted veterinaries. They create very specific instructions for their employees on how to use the medication to ensure that the medication is all used in the same way on every animal and that they all have the same registration. They have a very professional relationship with their veterinary. They call the veterinary often to reflect on the usage of their medications to make sure that the animals will not be unhealthy for their children. They have great communication with their veterinaries and converse often about how to improve their system of using medication and their business in general.

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What Is a Veterinary Technician? | National Veterinary Technician Week | Pawsitively Pets

What Is a Veterinary Technician? | National Veterinary Technician Week | Pawsitively Pets | Veterinary News | Scoop.it
What exactly do veterinary technicians do? They are like the animal nurses of the animal nurses of the veterinary world, and there isn't much they can't do! (What is a Veterinary Technician?

Via Tracey Lee Davis
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Veterinary technicians are the nurses of animals. They have a special week dedicated to them. This year it was October 13th- 19th. Veterinary technicians are like nurses for the animals but they do way more than a regular human nurse. Veterinary technicians do so much that it’s easier to say the things they are not allowed to do. They are not allowed to prescribe medication, perform surgery, or diagnose a patient. Their main duty is to perform technical jobs so that the Veterinary has time to complete their other important duties. There are a variety of different categories that the veterinary technicians work within. They are the nurses that take care of the patient whether sick or healthy. They are the surgical assistants that equip every patient for surgical procedures. They are the oral hygienists that clean teeth and take any x-rays if needed. They are the groomers that are in charge of bathing the animals, cut nails, anal gland expressions, and groom the fur. They are the phlebotomist that draw blood and insert IV catheters if needed. They are the laboratory technicians that run any tests. They are the janitors that clean up after surgery or anytime there is an animal in the hospital. They are lunch ladies, the dog walkers, the educators and so much more. Veterinary technicians have way more skills than a regular nurse, not just because they deal with many different animals, but because there is much to be done in an animal hospital that the veterinary can’t handle it all on their own.   

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