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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

空间分析技术在足球场上的应用,分析 on-field performance

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
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Explore old maps of US cities

Explore old maps of US cities | mapstory | Scoop.it

"This cool new historic mapping app from the folks at esri and the U.S. Geological Survey is worth exploring.  What it does is take 100 years of USGS maps and lets you overlay them for just about any location in the nation. That allows users to see how a city – say Harrisburg – developed between 1895 and today.  The library behind the project includes more than 178,000 maps dating from 1884 to 2006."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:
古今地图对比
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 12:20 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 



Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, historical.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 13, 12:25 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 

 

Chicago (1868)Denver (1879) Los Angeles (1880)Washington D.C.(1851)New York City (1836)San Francisco (1859)
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An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes | Design | WIRED

An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes | Design | WIRED | mapstory | Scoop.it
Before Hollywood, there was New York, and before New York there was Berlin, Paris, Rome and Greece.

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Guilhes Damian's curator insight, August 9, 3:57 PM

An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes http://wrd.cm/1ozGe77 #infographic #motion #video

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The Refugee Project

The Refugee Project | mapstory | Scoop.it
The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma, visualizes UNHCR refugee data and UN population data to tell the stories of refugee movements from 1975 to 2012.

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Guilhes Damian's curator insight, August 1, 6:44 PM

The Refugee Project: data visualization of the forced migrations of refugees around the world since 1975  http://bit.ly/1kbLAdi #dataviz

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | mapstory | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sharrock's curator insight, August 5, 8:30 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Titles like the one for this article, 40 maps that explain the Middle East, are becoming increasingly common for internet articles.  They helps us feel that we can explain all of the world's complexities and make sense of highly dynamic situations.  While we can all agree that maps are great analytical tools that can be very persuasive, sometimes we can pretend that they are the end all, be all for any situation.  Maps can also be used to show how something that we thought was simple can be much complex and nuanced than we had previously imagined, as demonstrated by this article, 15 Maps that Don't Explain the Middle East at All.  Both perspectives have their place (and both articles are quite insightful). Not connected to the Middle East, but East Asia, this article entitled Lies, Damned Lies and Maps continues the discussion of maps, truth and perception.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, colonialism, devolution,historical, mapping

Linda Denty's curator insight, August 5, 6:42 PM

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 8:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | mapstory | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

基尼系数

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | mapstory | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon
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Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 5:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

空间分析技术在足球场上的应用,分析 on-field performance

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

linguistic

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:48 AM

While this is ostensibly a map that would be great for a cultural geography unit, I'm also thinking about the spatial patterns that created this map.  What current or historical migrations account for some of the patterns visible here?  What would a map like this look like it it were produced 50 years ago?  Why are Vermont and West Virginia the only states without a county with over 10% of the population that speak another language at home? 

 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 5, 2013 2:34 PM

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

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Creating Games for Journalism

Creating Games for Journalism | mapstory | Scoop.it
Our job as journalists is to inform the public. By using emotion and empathy, games allow us to inform readers in a new way—and one in which they both remember and understand.
Hongsheng Li's insight:

map-based games linked with real-world news

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Political and Economic Geography Presentations

Political and Economic Geography Presentations | mapstory | Scoop.it

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 3, 2013 2:27 PM

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.  


Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:42 AM

These conference presentations show the importance that geography plays in the roles of both politics and economics. The impact that geography has on economics is a huge one. You could argue that geography is used as a scale in some instances in economics because of the land structure and locating were certain areas are.If you are able to locate certain things or find out where you want to put certain things in a place geography allows you to do so using economics.

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Friday's Food For Thought: Mapping American English

Friday's Food For Thought: Mapping American English | mapstory | Scoop.it
22 Maps Reveal American Dialects By Lindsay Tilton The age old question: "Is it soda or pop?" Joshua Katz, a Ph.D. statistics student at North Carolin...
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Country Maps · Public Domain · PAT, the free, open source, portable atlas

Hongsheng Li's insight:
PAT offers maps of 238 countries worldwide in the public domain. PAT is an excellent project of Ian Macky gives us a collection of maps of all countries of the world, we can also find them grouped by geographical area. Obviously not talking about Google Maps, but if they are high quality maps that can be used freely in any project. Very useful for teachers of geography or history, can be used in presentations, documents, pages, and blogs, applications, computer graphics or any other work. We can access the index of countries to download only the maps of the country that we are interested in or download the full pack with maps of 238 countries in a zipped file just 19 Mb
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Visualizando el tráfico ferroviario en España

Visualizando el tráfico ferroviario en España | mapstory | Scoop.it
Más allá de los debates en torno a la rentabilidad y la eficiencia del tren en España, nos pareció interesante saber qué estaciones tienen más tráfico respecto a la densidad de población de su región, y qué trayectos han aparecido y desaparecido en...

Via M. Roman
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Viewing rail traffic in Spain
    Beyond the debates about the profitability and efficiency of the train in Spain, it seemed interesting to know which stations have more traffic compared to the population density of the region, and what paths have come and gone in ...

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | mapstory | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

美国工业地理的演化

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Eli Levine's curator insight, August 8, 11:16 PM

We have been made into a nation of consumers, not unlike the Spanish at the turn of 16th century.  And what's going to happen when all of these Baby Boomers (who got us into this mess in the first place) die off, and we no longer have the need for all of these health and social services workers? 

 

When the US government was crafting its international trade policy, in collusion with the business leaders, did anyone thing that far ahead when they, by design, shipped all those manufacturing jobs overseas?  How have we, as a nation, really benefitted from losing our independence, our autonomy, and our ability to have decently paying employment for everybody?  How has the decline in real wealth held by a majority of people really benefitted anyone in the long term, including the rich people who have taken most of that wealth?  Haven't they looked back at all into the deep past of humanity, to know us, as a species?  Have they looked at the present situation, to see the water that's just beginning to get warm?  Do they at all gauge the probable future effects of their actions, based on knowledge of the present and the most accurate perspective on the past that you can get?

 

Who are these Satan worshipping, drug-addled, moronic, inbred, and careless people who have risen to be our so called "leaders"?

 

Idiots in suits, more like it.

 

Period.

 

Think about it.

Ted Ning's curator insight, August 9, 12:17 PM

Interesting to see how markets, jobs and emerging opportunities have changed. Need to keep up with the times. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:48 AM

APHG-U6

 

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

5分钟讲述文化历史

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wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

José Antonio Díaz Díaz's curator insight, August 19, 8:47 AM

"Animación que pretende mostrar la complejidad cultura cinco minutos, tomando como referencias sujetos como David, rey de Israel, y Leonardo da Vinci , de 600 C. hasta llegar a nuestros días. La Información proviene de Freebase, base de datos propiedad de Google.  Los desarrolladores pertenecen a la Universidad de Tejas en Dallas ".

Stewie Clock's curator insight, August 27, 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | mapstory | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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These Maps Reveal What People Around The World Really Care About

These Maps Reveal What People Around The World Really Care About | mapstory | Scoop.it
The importance of family, friends, leisure time, politics, work, and religion around the world.

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Should we be worried?


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

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diane gusa's curator insight, September 20, 2013 9:38 PM

I have felt for several decades that over consumption is our problem. As long as people produce more than they consume it would seem that this earth can continue. What do you think?

Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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Making lectures and lessons more interactive with mQlicker

Making lectures and lessons more interactive with mQlicker | mapstory | Scoop.it

As the traditional lecture has come increasingly under fire for being completely out of touch with modern teaching and learning methods, there has been a move by many teachers, conference presenters and lecturers to make their teaching techniques more modern and interactive. One of the key technologies for enabling this has been a range of audience response systems that provide real time responses to polls, questions and surveys while the speakers is actually presenting.


Via Nik Peachey
Hongsheng Li's insight:

交互式、听众参与式<桌面浏览器+多平台移动应用程序+服务器>的讲课方式;

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Nalya Ovshieva's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:13 AM

It's worth while trying it. Lectures that involve a degree of social interaction are usually more satisfying.

Eva Ramos's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:47 PM

Wow!  I am going to give this a try!

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 7, 2013 7:22 PM
Chwayita Ceejay January's insight:'

A very interesting tool, that teachers can use inside and outside the formal learning area. Where students can interact with the information live during the lecture (where most interaction should happen anyway) closing the 'cold and insigificant' student-lecturer relationship. Students can respond to the data while the lecture is in progress. As expensive and time-consuming (training) this intiative would be to udertake it would certainly improve lecture attedance. :D

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iMENTORS mapping ICT accross Sub-Saharan Africa

iMENTORS mapping ICT accross Sub-Saharan Africa | mapstory | Scoop.it
iMENTORS, the data warehouse on all e-infrastructure development projects of Sub-Saharan Africa, is one step closer to becoming the most comprehensive crowdsourcing map on ICT infrastructures in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | mapstory | Scoop.it

Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled “40 maps they didn’t teach you in school,” one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they’re no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog (see our full maps coverage here), with others from a variety of sources. I’ve included a link for further reading on close to every one.


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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | mapstory | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Via Seth Dixon
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Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

John Slifko's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:23 PM

Increasinglly the historiography of Freemasonry will be mpaced by he discipiine of historical geogrphy combining empirical data, place and narrative drama and code. 


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Mapping the Past: 1940 U.S. Census Goes Digital

Mapping the Past: 1940 U.S. Census Goes Digital | mapstory | Scoop.it
The U.S. Census has just embarked on an innovative online program that will allow anyone to search the 1940 Census and it even has a geospatial eleme...
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Population Density

Population Density | mapstory | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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La intensidad del Sol en Google Maps

La intensidad del Sol en Google Maps | mapstory | Scoop.it
Llega el verano, con él la playa y, por consiguiente, el riesgo de que lleguen las quemaduras del sol en la piel. Aunque la advertencia suene redundante es

Via M. Roman
Hongsheng Li's insight:

The intensity of the Sun in Google Maps

可以看出:海滩太阳最晒

Summer comes with it the beach and therefore the risk of sunburn reach the skin. Although the warning sounds redundant is a topic that must be very careful, and a mapping tool as Sunburn Map can help.

The map we display the information related to the intensity of ultraviolet rays across the globe according to the area you select, and not just thermal maps show us if we will collect a set of data according to various parameters such as for example if the weather is sunny or cloudy, the type of skin you have, hours maximum or minimum intensity ultraviolet radiation as it relates and the day of the week you choose. Depending on these factors, we report the time it takes sunlight to produce us burn with or without sunscreen (range varying from 23 minutes to 7 hours).

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