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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

空间分析技术在足球场上的应用,分析 on-field performance

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.

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NatGeo Maps on Google

NatGeo Maps on Google | mapstory | Scoop.it

The National Geographic Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888. National Geographic Maps publishes more than 100 new print maps annually and is a leading developer of digital map content found in websites and award-winning mobile apps. All proceeds from the sale and licensing of National Geographic maps go to support the Society's vital exploration, conservation, research and education programs. www.natgeomaps.com


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2014 8:33 PM

Have you ever wanted an archive of all the fabulous maps produced by National Geographic?  And what if you could preview a digital version of all of these NatGeo maps seamlessly on Google Maps?  That is exactly what this gallery delivers.   

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, December 25, 2014 7:03 AM
happy holidays
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, January 1, 9:57 PM

Very US focused but a good source of many maps

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This map shows 24h traffic isochrones for anyplace in the world

This map shows 24h traffic isochrones for anyplace in the world | mapstory | Scoop.it
Typical travel planning tools like Google Maps give you directions and travel times from point A to point B. The routes are selected based on algorithms using real-time or historic traffic informat...

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | mapstory | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

美国工业地理的演化

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:42 PM

According to the map, in 1990, manufacturing had the highest employment rates. By the early 2000's, it appears that retail trade has then taken the top spot for employment rates. Finally in 2013, most of the US is covering in orange, which represents employment in the health care and social assistance work field. When I opened the article, all these facts were written above the map. However, I did not even notice the written facts because I was too busy playing with the map. This article tells us the facts but does not really elaborate on why things have changed. For one thing, I think  the manufacturing job market decreased because once the products were being made to be sold, retail took it from there. Of course manufacturers were still needed to supply items, but then retail takes it over. Health care and social assistance services were both in the top by 2013. This is probably because more people who were certified in medical fields were needed. Thus they were hired, which lead this job market to the top.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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Hongsheng Li's insight:

5分钟讲述文化历史

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | mapstory | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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These Maps Reveal What People Around The World Really Care About

These Maps Reveal What People Around The World Really Care About | mapstory | Scoop.it
The importance of family, friends, leisure time, politics, work, and religion around the world.

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Should we be worried?


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

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diane gusa's curator insight, September 20, 2013 9:38 PM

I have felt for several decades that over consumption is our problem. As long as people produce more than they consume it would seem that this earth can continue. What do you think?

Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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Making lectures and lessons more interactive with mQlicker

Making lectures and lessons more interactive with mQlicker | mapstory | Scoop.it

As the traditional lecture has come increasingly under fire for being completely out of touch with modern teaching and learning methods, there has been a move by many teachers, conference presenters and lecturers to make their teaching techniques more modern and interactive. One of the key technologies for enabling this has been a range of audience response systems that provide real time responses to polls, questions and surveys while the speakers is actually presenting.


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交互式、听众参与式<桌面浏览器+多平台移动应用程序+服务器>的讲课方式;

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Nalya Ovshieva's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:13 AM

It's worth while trying it. Lectures that involve a degree of social interaction are usually more satisfying.

Eva Ramos's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:47 PM

Wow!  I am going to give this a try!

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 7, 2013 7:22 PM
Chwayita Ceejay January's insight:'

A very interesting tool, that teachers can use inside and outside the formal learning area. Where students can interact with the information live during the lecture (where most interaction should happen anyway) closing the 'cold and insigificant' student-lecturer relationship. Students can respond to the data while the lecture is in progress. As expensive and time-consuming (training) this intiative would be to udertake it would certainly improve lecture attedance. :D

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iMENTORS mapping ICT accross Sub-Saharan Africa

iMENTORS mapping ICT accross Sub-Saharan Africa | mapstory | Scoop.it
iMENTORS, the data warehouse on all e-infrastructure development projects of Sub-Saharan Africa, is one step closer to becoming the most comprehensive crowdsourcing map on ICT infrastructures in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | mapstory | Scoop.it

Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled “40 maps they didn’t teach you in school,” one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they’re no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog (see our full maps coverage here), with others from a variety of sources. I’ve included a link for further reading on close to every one.


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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | mapstory | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

John Slifko's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:23 PM

Increasinglly the historiography of Freemasonry will be mpaced by he discipiine of historical geogrphy combining empirical data, place and narrative drama and code. 


Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:03 PM

Good old Common Core.

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Mapping the Past: 1940 U.S. Census Goes Digital

Mapping the Past: 1940 U.S. Census Goes Digital | mapstory | Scoop.it
The U.S. Census has just embarked on an innovative online program that will allow anyone to search the 1940 Census and it even has a geospatial eleme...
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Population Density

Population Density | mapstory | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Choosing the right colours for your visualizations | Gravy Anecdote

Choosing the right colours for your visualizations | Gravy Anecdote | mapstory | Scoop.it

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Guilhes Damian's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:21 PM

Choosing the right colours for your visualizations http://bit.ly/1p74Knh (via @albertocairo) #dataviz @colors #tableau

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Explore old maps of US cities

Explore old maps of US cities | mapstory | Scoop.it

"This cool new historic mapping app from the folks at esri and the U.S. Geological Survey is worth exploring.  What it does is take 100 years of USGS maps and lets you overlay them for just about any location in the nation. That allows users to see how a city – say Harrisburg – developed between 1895 and today.  The library behind the project includes more than 178,000 maps dating from 1884 to 2006."


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古今地图对比
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:20 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 



Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, historical.

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:25 PM

For more ESRI maps that let you explore urban environmental change, the 'spyglass' feature gives these gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift (but not available for as many places). The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 

 

Chicago (1868)Denver (1879) Los Angeles (1880)Washington D.C.(1851)New York City (1836)San Francisco (1859)
Keegan Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

This sounds like it would be really cool. I'm interested in being able to see how cities and roads have developed over  time. You can look at places where people might have migrated across the land. It amazes me that they have 178,000 old maps included in their library from 1884 to 2006..  

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An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes | Design | WIRED

An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes | Design | WIRED | mapstory | Scoop.it
Before Hollywood, there was New York, and before New York there was Berlin, Paris, Rome and Greece.

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Guilhes Damian's curator insight, August 9, 2014 3:57 PM

An Infographic That Maps 2,000 Years of Cultural History in 5 Minutes http://wrd.cm/1ozGe77 #infographic #motion #video

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The Refugee Project

The Refugee Project | mapstory | Scoop.it
The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma, visualizes UNHCR refugee data and UN population data to tell the stories of refugee movements from 1975 to 2012.

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Guilhes Damian's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:44 PM

The Refugee Project: data visualization of the forced migrations of refugees around the world since 1975  http://bit.ly/1kbLAdi #dataviz

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | mapstory | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 11, 4:44 PM

This was an excellent portrayal of the middle east. The using of maps accompanied by side paragraphs explains the long history which is necessary to know if one is to understand its current status. When learning about different realms and regions (that existed throughout history) I always find it on a map. In order to truly understand a certain empire, one must know its geographical setting and its significance. It helps me better understand the region. These maps, specifically the ones that are changing through the domains reign, are extremely helpful in better comprehending the misunderstood middle eastern region. This website also creates more thought. If a particular map captivates the reader they can do more research on the topic. However, the "slides" do stand alone portraying much knowledge to a wide variety of specific elements that are still ongoing. The grouping of the slides by region/conflict/country was also an excellent strategy. It shows organization which in turn develops an easier learning process. 

The initial map educates many people of how what is modern day Iraq used to be an Oasis. However, over time, due to over farming and soil erosion the landscape changed to dry/desert territory. 

The maps displaying the rise of Islam and its transitioning into the Ottoman Empire give a great perspective as to the amount of land it covered. The Islamic world thrived and was very advanced in there culture in regards to medicine and arithmetic. The shear size of the empires should increase ones respect of the Islamic theatre. What many people are not aware of is how the Ottoman Empire was knocking on the door of the Holy Roman Empire during the sixteenth century. This was quite an advancement of territory crossing through much of eastern Europe ending as far west as Vienna. A lot of what is Eastern Europe today was part of the Ottoman Empire, including Greece. 

Another excellent map that contributes to the better understanding of western involvement can be seen in the carving up of the Ottoman Empire post WWI. Colonialism was very much present throughout less developed regions so the carving up of the middle east was not an exotic concept to the victorious west. Territories/countries were created and ethnic groups dominated one another. Its certainly true a western presence has contributed to prior and existing issues throughout the middle East.

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | mapstory | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

基尼系数

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | mapstory | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2:15 PM

Fantastic collection!

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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

空间分析技术在足球场上的应用,分析 on-field performance

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | mapstory | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
Hongsheng Li's insight:

linguistic

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Creating Games for Journalism

Creating Games for Journalism | mapstory | Scoop.it
Our job as journalists is to inform the public. By using emotion and empathy, games allow us to inform readers in a new way—and one in which they both remember and understand.
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map-based games linked with real-world news

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Political and Economic Geography Presentations

Political and Economic Geography Presentations | mapstory | Scoop.it

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 3, 2013 2:27 PM

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.  


Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:42 AM

These conference presentations show the importance that geography plays in the roles of both politics and economics. The impact that geography has on economics is a huge one. You could argue that geography is used as a scale in some instances in economics because of the land structure and locating were certain areas are.If you are able to locate certain things or find out where you want to put certain things in a place geography allows you to do so using economics.

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Friday's Food For Thought: Mapping American English

Friday's Food For Thought: Mapping American English | mapstory | Scoop.it
22 Maps Reveal American Dialects By Lindsay Tilton The age old question: "Is it soda or pop?" Joshua Katz, a Ph.D. statistics student at North Carolin...
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