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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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11 of the Most Influential Infographics of the 19th-Century...

11 of the Most Influential Infographics of the 19th-Century... | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
We live in a world steeped in graphic information. From Google Maps and GIS to the proliferation of infographics and animated maps, visual data surrounds us.

While we may think of infographics as a relatively recent development to make sense of the immense amount of data available on the Web, they actually are rooted in the 19th century.

Two major developments led to a breakthrough in infographics: advances in lithography and chromolithography, which made it possible to experiment with different types of visual representations, and the availability of vast amounts of data, including from the American Census as well as natural scientists, who faced heaps of information about the natural world, such as daily readings of wind, rainfall, and temperature spanning decades.

But such data was really only useful to the extent that it could be rendered in visual form. And this is why innovation in cartography and graphic visualization mattered so greatly...


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Infographic: “If the World were 100 People” | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

Infographic: “If the World were 100 People” | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

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Regional NFL Fan Bases

Regional NFL Fan Bases | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Any cartographic fine-tuning of borders that you would suggest?  What truths does this map obscure?

 

Tags: regions, sport, mapping.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 10, 2012 10:17 AM
As a huge football fan, this map is very interesting to me. It shows how different populations are in different parts of the country due to where fans are located.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:28 PM

I like how this map shows regionaly were most fans of a certain team are.  However one thing it fails to take into account are fans of a certain team that live in another region.  Like I live in Rhode Isalnd so based on the map i would be a Patriots fan, however I am  49ers fan, and I know i am not the only fan of a team not living in that teams region. 

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:49 PM

An excellent visual representation of functional regions.

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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


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How Much Data is Created Every Minute?

How Much Data is Created Every Minute? | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

HOW MUCH DATA IS CREATED EVERY MINUTE?
Data never sleeps. Every minute massive amounts of it are being generated from every phone, website and application across the Internet. Just how much data is being created and where does it come from?
For that, check out this infographic...


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Africa Next

Africa Next | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Tour the States - Music Video

Full album: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats Music by Renald Francoeur Drawing by Craighton Berman "Tour the States" is track #1 from Brain Beats, a mnemonic CD...

 

It’s so often stated that geography education is so much more than just learning states and capitals. I wholeheartedly endorse that sentiment, but there is still some rudimentary importance to learning about where places are. I see it as analogous for English majors needing to learn basic grammar. You can’t write a masterpiece if you are still fumbling around with the alphabet. In geography, we can't have a nuanced discussion of place and interconnectedness if we have no sense of where any place actually is.

 

Tags: USA, K12, video, GeographyEducation.


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Gillian & Alexis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:11 PM

A great, to-the-point video showing the political geography of the United States. Quick and fast facts on the 50 states and capitals made into a catchy song! Chosen for poltical geography content. TOPIC: Geography-Location

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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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Innovative funding model allows urban poor to determine their own future

Innovative funding model allows urban poor to determine their own future | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
Katia Savchuk: The first global fund to give poor people direct control over urban development spending is having more than just a local impact...

 

The innovative fund lets poor communities define development strategies and manage capital from neighbourhood to global level.

 

The cost-effectiveness and broad impact of this financing model points to the need for placing urban poor communities at the helm of development spending in cities.

 

"All successful urban initiatives have been ones that have placed people's knowledge and people's action at the centre of the process," says Diana Mitlin, a researcher at the International Institute for Environment and Development who has worked with SDI for more than a decade.

 

( Get the whole article by clicking on the headline linked to the original... )


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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 29, 12:32 PM

I find it fascinating that even today, we are able to unearth mysteries in some of our more developed cities. Places can be multi-layered and can tell more stories than just what lies on the surface. The fact that this site has been the location for multiple spiritual centers is both bizarre and magical in a sense, and makes you wonder if there is some unknown reason as to why that first Aztec temple for erected there first. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 16, 6:20 PM

Of course archaeological finds like this are always interesting for understanding the past but this story has two angles. First and probably the most obvious is the wealth of anthropological and history information that can be gathered. This could potentially lead to an advancement in the understanding of Aztec society. But on another angle it is an interesting article because it illustrates how so often the new is built right on top of the old. Where was the old capital of the Aztec Empire? Right under the new capital of Mexico. While by doing so one definitely keeps the same advantages that lead to choosing that land in the first place but it also destroys history and origins of a peoples history.  

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 8:50 PM

Wow! What an amazing archaeological discovery. Seeing the image of the Aztec temple superimposed to Mexico city really shows the immense size of this structural relic.It is interesting to know that the Spaniards had also built their religious temple on this location. This is a tremendous find not only structurally but also in human biology. Many bodies were exhumed during this discovery. The bodies can not only tell us scientifically what has happened ,we can also learn from them what type of funerary processes were used during this time.

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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:15 AM

Fascinating interactive map looking at the separatist movements in Africa.  

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:00 PM

It seems as though African countries are actually trying to go back to their pre-colonial boundaries. The agreement they made to respect the old colonial borders to avoid war has never been effective.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 1:31 PM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Aerial Data Visualisation Reveals Life In The United States

Aerial Data Visualisation Reveals Life In The United States | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

PBS is exploring the hidden patterns and rhythms that make America work. They are taking this data and visualizing it in a series being called, America Revealed...


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The New World

The New World | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
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Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas

Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas - Organic agriculture is a growing trend in big cities around the world, including Latin America, and no...

 

This article nicely ties two commonly taught issues in human geography that aren't the the typical combination: 1) the growth of organic farming and 2) the spread of squatter settlements and slums in the developing world. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities. 


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 30, 2012 9:12 PM
I found this to be a possitive aspect that can help the people in the favellas. They are growing their own food from their own homes and it allows them to have food and saftey because they dont have to worry about going somewhere far off to farm.
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:03 AM

This is a new trend spreading to Brazil. Now with the organic craze that has been going around in past years farmers have sought out way to grow their food more organically. This also allows poor areas to benefit from organic farming because it is now present in their area and they can no buy food that is good and of their choice. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 21, 10:19 PM

Seeing how even Urbanized areas of the world can get into agriculture shows that you do not need to have geographic land advantage to grow crops. The Brazilian favelas are getting into agriculture to bring extra income and a sense of community to the area, getting more agriculture into these urban areas will be aided by the government in order to keep the urban agriculture movement growing

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...

 

The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?

 

Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture. 


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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 6, 3:05 PM

This is crazy! Within the short 24 years that have passed since 1990 the Aral sea is just about dried up.  After sliding the bar across the land you can see just how much of the sea has gone dry.  Seeing the little areas of land poking out of the sea in 1990 is interesting, you think that you would have to go very deep to find the bottom, but clearly you don't have to go very far now, as the sea is very close to being dried up.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 6:44 PM

(Central Asia topic 3)

The Aral Sea is perhaps one of the most rapidly-changing, large-scale examples of climate change. Though the climate of the region has been getting statistically drier over recent years, it is impossible to say that the full extent has not been exacerbated by humanity. Yes, growing more and more crops seems like a good idea at first, but if it means having no water to grow crops the next year it is much more detrimental.

I found it interesting how not only the water level is dropping, but effect it is having on the local climate as a result (such as less lake-effect precipitation). This goes to show how truly interconnect our planet's systems are to themselves.

Also, I couldn't help but notice the obvious parallels between the Aral Sea and Lake Mead: growing populations, increased water usage, and 'domino-effect' impacts on their regions.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:24 PM

Looking at the images above it is understandable that the disappearance of the Aral Sea is known as the greatest environmental disaster (that we are not talking about). The amount of change that has taken place in this area is incomprehensible for the amount of time it has taken. Humans so often do not consider their actions on this planet , I believe what has taken place here is an utter shame.

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Climate Change Music Video

A musical video that serves as investigation into the causes and effects of global climate change and our opportunities to use science to offset it. Featuring Bill Nye, David Attenborough, Richard Alley and Isaac Asimov. "Our Biggest Challenge" is the 16th episode of the Symphony of Science series.  Visit http://symphonyofscience.com for more science remixes!

 

Tags: climatechange, environment, K12.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:11 AM
I am from the Philippines, and the effect of global warming in our country is really sad. Flash floods, earthquakes, heavy rains.... wasted lives. I wish there could be a true solution to this problem.
Wanda Faye Bryant's curator insight, January 7, 4:51 PM

An interesting way to present the problem and solutions of rapid climate change to students.