Maps for urbanization
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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Maps for urbanization | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


Via Seth Dixon
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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
Rescooped by Billy Evans from Geography Education
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.