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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | Maps | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


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viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

not only has poverty increased drastically in the south and spread west but also states that where considered to be low percentage of poverty have increased to poverty. many states up north are now in danger. the economy hasn't increased at all in the last twenty plus years and it should be interesting to see what happens in the future, hopefully the south doesn't get too far under the poverty line to the point where it can't be brought back.

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Big maq attack

Big maq attack | Maps | Scoop.it

"A 50-year-old export industry that provides millions of jobs has to reinvent itself quickly to stay competitive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:32 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


TagsMexicomanufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

John Slifko's curator insight, January 13, 2014 4:02 PM

In addition to commerce what are the democratic and civil society institutions and social mvoements involved, or not involved, in this transiation now apparently underway?  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


Tags: Mexico, manufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

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How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public

How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public | Maps | Scoop.it
Even as publics in many of the surveyed Muslim-majority countries express a clear preference for women to dress conservatively, many also say women should be able to decide for themselves what to wear.

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mjonesED's curator insight, January 18, 2014 5:02 PM

For our colleagues who might be traveling in the middle east.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:57 PM

I am not sure if it is because I am an independently raised western woman but this whole article seems to completely address women as property.  I realize that some countries are much stricter than others but it is not something I can comprehend.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:09 PM

It appears our friends in Saudi Arabia like their women to be almost completely hidden from view with 74% claiming that the most appropriate dress is to have no more than the eyes showing while in public. Pakistan is the second most tolerant at a distant 35%. Overall, the most popular "form" for women in public is to show the facial region only with 44% of countries surveyed agreeing. On the other end of the spectrum is Lebanon who think that women with no head dress is appropriate nearly half the time. Turkey is in second with 32% believing that this is okay.

Put another way, Lebanon thinks it is okay for their women to dress with no head dress by a 15-1 ratio over the Saudi's. Unbelievable that I am writing about this in the year 2015. The Middle East should allow more than the middle of their women's face to be shown. Lebanon seems to be the most tolerant, let's hope the rest of the countries can follow their lead.

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Geographic Midpoint Calculator, Find Your Personal Center of Gravity

Geographic Midpoint Calculator, Find Your Personal Center of Gravity | Maps | Scoop.it
Finds the exact point that lies halfway between two or more places. Find your personal center of gravity--the geographic average location for all of the places you have lived in.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:35 AM

Very insightful tool when it comes to travelling or family reunions. i personally used this for a while to figure out a good place for me and my friends from chicago/trenton to met up and it brought me to the middle of penn. also this was pretty fun just to mess around with to see random midpoint locations between two places.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:37 AM
Find your personal center of gravity. Select all cities or addresses where you have lived, then view those places on a map along with a marker pointing at your exact average location.Where is it?______________________________________ Find the midpoint of a flight between Haddonfield and:              SAN JOSE_______________________              NEW ORLEANS___________________________              FARGO, N.D. ______________________________              SAN FRANCISCO___________________________               ORLANDO, FLA.___________________________________Locate the midpoint for where you hope to go to school:______________________________________________You are going to initiate a family reunion. Choose 6 family members and find a center location that will be fair and equitable for those who are traveling. Where are the 6 family members coming from? 1.____________________________2._____________________________3.________________________________4._____________________________ 5.______________________________ 6.____________________________ Where will the reunion take place?___________________________________________Find a central place in Haddonfield for  a new business or facility that will serve all of the folks in Haddonfield. here will that be?__________________________________________NJSIAA want to build a multi sport facility for football and track. Where should this facility be constructed?_________________________________________________________
Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 10:05 AM

Fun geographic activity

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Maps | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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9 questions about South Sudan you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about South Sudan you were too embarrassed to ask | Maps | Scoop.it

"South Sudan's crisis began just two weeks ago, on Dec. 15, and it already has observers warning that it could lead to civil war. Fighting has killed an estimated 1,000 people and sent 121,600 fleeing from their homes. International peacekeepers are preparing for the worst; some have been killed and a number of them, including four U.S. troops, have been injured.  What's happening in South Sudan is complicated and can be difficult to follow; understanding how it got to be this way can be even tougher. Here, then, are the most basic answers to your most basic questions. First, a disclaimer: This is not an exhaustive or definitive account of South Sudan and its history -- just some background, written so that anyone can understand it."


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Brien Shanahan's curator insight, January 5, 2014 5:30 PM

Sad what's going in South Sudan but worth learning about it.

Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:50 AM

New countries rarely establish themselves without a trying conflict or struggle in their infancy. I always like this simplified articles which introduce the latest conflict to people who are unaware. Ethnic groups are fluid in their importance throughout the world. It wasn't long ago on the historical scale that Irish Americans and British Americans were at odds, despite us in the US rarely considering that today. Ethnic conflict never ceases completely, but shifts targets depending on the politics of the time.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:39 PM

Without the big bad north to be their common enemy, the two ethnic groups in South Sudan are now fighting each other. In places like these with such limited resources there will always be internal conflicts

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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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Walled World

Walled World | Maps | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Detroit on the edge

Detroit on the edge | Maps | Scoop.it
Bob Simon reports on the decline of America's former industrial capital and the people determined to bring it back

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:32 PM

Detroit is the largest city to declare bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail as a major metropolitan area.  Sections of the city are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic bestselling novel:  80,000 buildings stand empty, 40% of the streetlights don’t work, and it routinely takes police one hour to respond to a 911 call.


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 12:21 PM

The Detroit "Renaissance"  is an interesting one to say the least. There is an obvious opportunity to lay the foundations for something new and bold after clearing the rubble that has become detroit. But who is going to be displaced once the rubble's cleared and the trendy cafes, art studios, and co-ops are erected? Who amongst the poor and already displaced will be held up high, encouraged, and supported to help create this new Detroit? Cutting costs from health care and pensions, from those who already live in this city and are struggling, doesn't sound particularly productive. Especially after referencing having posession of extremely valuable art pieces that could be sold off. This article really sheds a light on the pro's and con's that are associated in capital investment in a bankrupt and wartorn American city.

I don't think that the poor and hungry care about paint on a canvas. They need access to opportunity and the resources to seize it.

 

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Maps | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.


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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Maps | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Maps | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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Climate Change at it's most basic

http://www.HowGlobalWarmingWorks.org University of California

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Expert's comment, December 18, 2013 7:27 PM
hmm.
imran bharti's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:46 PM

good

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:17 AM

This video shoes us how climate change works in the most basic understanding. The video shows how global warming works and what exactly it does. It also shows how the climate changes effect the earth and the importance of understanding the  climate.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Maps | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead

South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead | Maps | Scoop.it

"Two days of street battles between rival factions in South Sudan's army left parts of the capital in ruins and prompted fears of a bloodbath in the world's youngest country.

UN officials in New York said they had received reports from local sources indicating that between 400 and 500 people had been killed and up to 800 wounded. More than 16,000 people were seeking refuge at UN facilities. What began on Sunday night as an alleged coup attempt now threatens to widen deep ethnic divisions in a country awash with weapons and still recovering from a devastating war that led to its secession from the north in 2011."


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:51 PM

The newest nation in the world still faces hardships today in 2014. In 2013 the country was almost involved with a civil war between the government and rebel forces. One of the reasons for violence occurring was some people who were supportive of the vice president felt the president was acting like a dictator. However, in 2014 a cease-fire was signed between the government and rebel forces, but violence still occurs between those groups of people and over natural resources such as oil.

It is very difficult for the newest country in the world to be successful, as it is politically unstable. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:37 PM

Wow they just got their own country and now they are fighting amongst themselves. The government said it was a misunderstanding. Sad that 500 people died due to a misunderstanding.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:59 PM

Two and a half years as a country and they are already fighting?  With all the instability already in Sudan before South Sudan was created it doesn't help that there are differences between the people of South Sudan to add to the mix.  The people don't even trust their own government as they are flocking in masses to the UN refugee centers instead of listening to the government when they have been assured security.  With any hope South Sudan can get it together, stop killing their own people, and become an example for other countries around them to follow.

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The Future of Remote Sensing?

"We are pleased to introduce the world's first high-resolution HD video of Earth taken from a commercial remote sensing satellite.

This video showcases a selection of the first videos taken from SkySat-1, the first of our planned 24 satellite constellation. The video clips have not yet been calibrated or tuned. SkySat-1 captures up to 90-second video clips at 30 frames per second. The resolution is high enough to resolve objects that impact the global economy like shipping containers, while maintaining a level of clarity that does not determine human activity."


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mengotti severino's curator insight, January 2, 2014 9:50 AM

Osserva divertito i surfisti e immagina di essere tu, travolto dall'onda delle FATTURE TELECOM.  Salvati, passa a DIGITEL di Mengotti. 3291481498 .

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:06 PM

This video, created in December of 2013, illustrates the first HD video recorded from a remote sensing satellite. A milestone such as this one opens tons of doors for future progress on remote sensing. 

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:00 PM

Over the past years, remote sensing has established major innovations such as capturing the world's first high-resolution HD video of Earth taken from a satellite. Within the link, a video is shown to show the viewer the exact HD video taken and portrays detailed depictions of the world's surface along with labels pertaining to these specific locations. What this means for the future of remote sensing is that geographers can now access high resolution videos of any part of the world from remote sensing technologies located in space. These innovations show the bright future of geographical technologies and opens the door to many possibilities people can take to further improving remote sensing. 

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Maps | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | Maps | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

Rescooped by Nancy Thorne from Geography Education
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Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy

Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy | Maps | Scoop.it

"Later this week, there will be a memorial service on the Penn State campus (Oct 26th-see details here)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:21 PM

This summer I unexpectedly found myself at the estate sale of the great cultural geographer, Wilbur Zelinsky.  I heard earlier through the Penn State geography department that he had passed away, but was startled to find myself discussing his legacy with his children.  This picture (that was being held up by the most amazing magnet ever) on his filing cabinet seems like a perfect tribute to his intellectual legacy.  Read the full article with additional pictures here.

Gilbert C FAURE's comment, October 21, 2013 4:13 AM
this is a general fact: "This was when I realized that young academics always make a name for themselves by standing on the shoulders of giants; some choose then to look down on their predecessors while others acknowledge that their work is dependent on those who came before. " congratulations for this analysis of human beings attitudes...Scientists are human after all
Rescooped by Nancy Thorne from Geography Education
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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | Maps | Scoop.it

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xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 2015 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:37 AM

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.