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Scooped by Marin Castberg
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5 Ways To Prove To Your Boss You Need Content Curation

5 Ways To Prove To Your Boss You Need Content Curation | Maps | Scoop.it
Have You Made the Business Case For Content Curation? If not, this data will help persuade your management to invest in content curation.
Source: heidicohen.com

This is a solid summary by Heidi Cohen on why content curation is besoming essential to businesses. Its role to content strategy mix has evolved from being anecdotical a few years ago to becoming central as it not only helps fill the gap but provides meaningful synergies for your created content.

 

Now as Heidi puts it, content curation is not free: while it's - as she puts it - "a low cost way to fill your content marketing pipeline", low doesn't mean zero. I still regularly have debates with people who think that automated aggregation can replace content curation: it doesn't. There's no way to set it up once and forget about it. You'll need to invest as little as 15 minutes a day to achieve results but these 15' need to be spent. Continue reading →
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Introducing Templates, Embedded Topics, and WordPress Integration through Scoop.it

Introducing Templates, Embedded Topics, and WordPress Integration through Scoop.it | Maps | Scoop.it
We started Scoop.it for a simple reason: back 4 years ago, we observed that Web 2.0 didn’t just bring all of us an opportunity but also created an expectation that would require new tools for busy professionals. With blogs, social networks and content platforms, you don’t just have a chance to become a media if you’d like to: you are now expected to regularly publish content. The content we publish determines not only how visible we are online but also shapes other people’s perception of our interests, our areas of expertise, our skills etc.
In short, you are the content you publish.
Of course, this means first of all you should participate and that’s what we’ve been focusing on enabling so far: an experience and a curation technology that makes it easier and time-efficient to discover, curate and publish quality content on our interests. But because this content is intimately connected to our online identity, reputation and brand, we’re pleased to launch today awesome and super easy new ways to brand your curated content with Scoop.it: Continue reading →
Marin Castberg's insight:

Valg av plattform ? Bruker en eller mange ? Privat eller jobb?

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Racehorse owned by Britain's queen fails dope test

Racehorse owned by Britain's queen fails dope test | Maps | Scoop.it
LONDON (AP) — A racehorse owned by Britain's Queen Elizabeth II that won the prestigious Gold Cup at Royal Ascot last year has tested positive for the banned...
Marin Castberg's insight:

Trist - men det er vel neppe dronningen som står bak....

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Rescooped by Marin Castberg from Geography Education
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African borders

African borders | Maps | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


Via Seth Dixon
Marin Castberg's insight:

Knowledge about history, valuable to understand the world today

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 14, 2015 9:45 PM

In all honesty, the history of Africa intrigues me. I've always tried to expand my knowledge on the subject as well as stay current with its modern affairs (as best as possible). I have had the pleasure of studying abroad in South Africa for a semester as well as taking courses focusing on the vast continent throughout my career as a RIC student. 

Ancient Africa is a topic I know more about than the average person. It's slavery and the effects it had on the realm, followed by Colonialism/Post Colonialism that I like to take pride in knowing best. I've taken different courses focusing on the matter and have done my fair share of research for pleasure. However, I still have a lot more research to do because I have so many thoughts, questions, and comments  (before making a comment on a particular subject I like to research it in depth) to make. 

I have the desire to pursue an education focusing on "Africa" and its colonial aspects. I feel like I would pursue a solid topic of high interest-perhaps even importance- to me and research the dickens out of it. I would prefer it to be an original piece though. Not a blunt history of colonial rule in Africa, whether it be specific or broad. I do not want to reiterate what others have already side. I want to create my own theories on Africa. 

Currently I am quite interested in "Post-Colonial" Africa and the fact that I find this term to be exotic, foreign, and even a facade. There are colonial aspects of Africa that have existed for decades and will continue to do so as long as Western and Eastern (China) "business" is "functioning." "Business" is broad yet it is being used here to describe the basic global economy, producers and consumers thus a subsequent supply and demand. Now, what does the term "functioning" mean? Well, to simply put it, business functions through Africa's exponential amount of natural resources, cheap labor, and corrupt officials. Most of the civilized world benefits from Africa's numerable resources yet the vast majority of African's themselves do not enjoy such pleasures. This is a trend that has existed since the Portuguese appraised the Western Coast of the continent in the early fifteenth century. 

I understand that this basic premise may not be the first of its kind, in general. However, there are specific situations/conflicts that can be researched further towards developing a more unique body of work. If I do pursue a higher education in this area I plan on succeeding in producing a sound body of work that I am proud to put my name on. It would be neat to teach the significance of the three maps displayed in this scoop.it article. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:20 AM

UNIT 4 POLITICAL 

This article shows many maps depicting the history and creation of African borders, as well as the impact of colonialism on Africa. This shows where different groups resided, and how borders were not properly made to fit one single nation, but mixed together many nations in one region.These maps are extremely useful when trying to learn more about Africa and its history, specifically its boundaries.