Maps are Arguments
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Maps are Arguments
"The maps are arguments, and the mapmaking is a rhetorical exercise." --Denis Wood (2010) | geography, literacy, media, and learning
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MapMaker Interactive

MapMaker Interactive | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

NGs MapMaker Interactive, a simple intro to spatial tech. "Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps."


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Maps of the Future

Maps of the Future | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
A 1989 prediction about portable GPS devices was right on the money...

 

From Seth Dixon: "As technology continues to speed ahead, how we interact with maps will keep evolving.  This is a thoughtful blog post that spectulates about the future of mapping."


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:20 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of GIS, GPS, and mapping, because it indicates that technology will continue to play a significant role in morphing the utility and function of maps in the future.

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Poverty rates: Most U.S. counties see increasing poverty rates

Poverty rates: Most U.S. counties see increasing poverty rates | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Another great thematic map from Slate: "How Hard is Poverty Hitting Your County?" County-by-county changes in poverty: 2007-2010.

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U.S. Life Expectancy by County

U.S. Life Expectancy by County | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Great new map from Jonathan Crowe (maproomblog.com). As much as a 15-year difference in life expectancy in different counties in the U.S. Even some large disparities within states.

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Google Lit Trips

Google Lit Trips | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Google Earth is a great teaching tool for geographers, but it is also a way to bring geography and spatial thinking to other disciplines.  Google Lit Tips marks the journeys that take place in literature (both fiction and non-fiction) all the more real by mapping out the movements as a KML file that can be viewed in Google Earth.  By embedding pictures, websites, videos and text into the path, this becomes an incredibly interactive resource for teachers of all levels.


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Robin Manning's comment, May 3, 2012 6:02 PM
I make my students do one of these for their Spring Book Project - very fun.
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The inspiration for my site, Denis Wood, on maps: “Maps are arguments.”

The inspiration for my site, Denis Wood, on maps: “Maps are arguments.” | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
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Spatial History Project

Spatial History Project | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

The Spatial History Project at Stanford puts together some fantastic geovisualization that is an awesome site that allows you or your kids to spatial and temporally the diffusion of Nazi concentration camps.  It has some clickable 'GIS-like' layers to help students contextualize the data and to make some important interdisciplinary connections.  Originally spotted on http://ushistoryeducatorblog.blogspot.com/


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From Sketch to the NY Times: The Making of One Map

From Sketch to the NY Times: The Making of One Map | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
Before, During and After: The Richest 1 Percent This weekend the NYT published Shaila Dewan and Robert Gebeloff’s story about the richest 1 percent of Americans (a more diverse bunch than you’d...
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Visualizing Slavery by Susan Schulten

Visualizing Slavery by Susan Schulten | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
The United States Coast Survey produced one of the first maps to depict census data-and a powerful demonstration of the geography of the slave-owning South.
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Maps of the 2008 US Presidential Election Results

Maps of the 2008 US Presidential Election Results | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Cool cartograms by Mark Newman at the University of Michigan

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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:09 AM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

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The #literacies Chat is Born! « developing writers

The #literacies Chat is Born! « developing writers | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
Below you'll find the birthing story of the #literacies chat, a weekly chat on Twitter bringing together educators, researchers and thinkers fascinated by contemporary literacies.

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Mind the Map

Mind the Map | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Great description from Seth Dixon: "The London Transportation Museum is currently hosting an exhibit entitled “Mind the Map: Inspiring Art, Design and Cartography” (which is a clever play on the omnipresent London Underground caution to ‘Mind the Gap’ when exiting or enter the subway).  From May 18th to October 28th this geographically-inspired exhibit will be open to the general public.  Yesterday at the Grand Opening, there were artists, authors and urban planners discussing their work, all of which dealt with the importance of transportation networks as an essential component to creating alternative urban visions.  There are also humanistic works of art that see transportation as the lifeblood of the city, pulsating to the rhythms of the diverse demographic segments and uniting Londoners.  This exhibit is absolutely for all London geographer teachers, or anyone visiting London before the exhibit closes on Oct 28, 2012."

 


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Sports championships map from Slate

Sports championships map from Slate | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

Great thematic map from Slate. Sports championships by city. The map says 8 championships for Cleveland. But none in my lifetime.

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International Fast Food Consumption

International Fast Food Consumption | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

This cartogram shows the distribution of one major fast food outlet brand (McDonalds's). By 2004 there were 30,496 of these McDonald's worldwide with 45% located in the United States.  The next highest number of these outlets are in Japan, Canada and Germany.

 

The world average number of outlets of this one brand alone is 5 per million people. In the United States there are 47 per million people; in Argentina and Chile the rate is a tenth of the American rate; the rate in Indonesia, China and Georgia is a hundredth of the American rate. In all the territories of Africa there were only 150 outlets: mostly in South Africa.  What does this say about consumption, economics, development, globalization and branding? Search http://worldmapper.org for more excellent cartograms. 


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:08 AM

No wonder America is the biggest one. People here are mostly too busy to prepare proper food for their diet. Is easier and more efficient just stop by and go back to work as soon as possibly. 

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OpenStreetMap: 'It's the Wikipedia of maps'

OpenStreetMap: 'It's the Wikipedia of maps' | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
50 new radicals: Killian Fox on OpenStreetMap, a map of the world that anyone can edit...

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Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it

An independent analysis conducted by mapping analytics firm PetersonGIS shows that locations with the highest obesity rates contain the fewest farmers’ markets.

 


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2012 Presidential Election Interactive Map and History of the Electoral College

2012 Presidential Election Interactive Map and History of the Electoral College | Maps are Arguments | Scoop.it
Interactive map for the upcoming 2012 presidential election. Use it to predict which candidate will reach the necessary 270 electoral votes. The road map to 270 lets you see all remaining combinations.
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