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All the good stuff about Traveling: mental, virtual and real life Maps of Worlds where no one has gone before ...
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Spiders, Planets and a Boson: Science's Top Stories of 2012 - @BetsyMason

Spiders, Planets and a Boson: Science's Top Stories of 2012 - @BetsyMason | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

This year, our list of most popular stories was dominated by 2012's most famous robot, a long-sought subatomic particle, 10 billion exoplanets and an amazing new spider species.

 

 

 
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Why Story Matters - @Thaler Pekar

Why Story Matters - @Thaler Pekar | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

   “Communication is more than a transmission or transference device—it is a way in which we connect with and realize our humanity.” In my work, I help people share their stories so listeners will find resonance and will share their own stories in return. This is how mutual communication helps advance humanity. The one thing I would like you to take away is that communication is more than transactional. Communication can be transformative.

   Modern, effective communication is more than transactional. Communication can be transformative. Communication has to be about engagement.

 
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Study: The Brains of Storytellers And Their Listeners Actually Sync Up - Greg J. Stephens et al.

Study: The Brains of Storytellers And Their Listeners Actually Sync Up - Greg J. Stephens et al. | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

Mind & Brain | brain | You may be talking and I may be listening, but our brains look strikingly similar.That's the conclusion of a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

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The Future of StoryTelling 2012 - Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc [Video] - Paul Zak

   The emotionally charged story recounted at the beginning Dr. Paul Zak's film—of a terminally ill two-year-old named Ben and his father—offers a simple yet remarkable case study in how the human brain responds to effective storytelling.

   As part of his study, Dr. Zak, a founding pioneer in the emerging field of neuroeconomics, closely monitored the neural activity of hundreds of people who viewed Ben's story.

   What he discovered is that even the simplest narrative, if it is highly engaging and follows the classic dramatic arc outlined by the German playwright Gustav Freytag, can evoke powerful empathic responses associated with specific neurochemicals, namely cortisol and oxytocin.

   Those brain responses, in turn, can translate readily into concrete action—in the case of Dr. Zak's study subjects, generous donations to charity and even monetary gifts to fellow participants.

   By contrast, stories that fail to follow the dramatic arc of rising action/climax/denouement—no matter how outwardly happy or pleasant those stories may be—elicit little if any emotional or chemical response, and correspond to a similar absence of action.

 
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Why We Need Storytellers at the Heart of Product Development - @SarahDoody

Why We Need Storytellers at the Heart of Product Development - @SarahDoody | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

   What we need is a new role: the product storyteller.Who are the product storytellers? Part matchmaker, marketer, technologist, and artist, the product storytellers ask questions, find answers, and figure out how to distill a vision or idea into a product story. They develop a plot, identify the people, and shape the product around the specific values it should offer consumers. Product storytellers think about the whole, and they see the big picture. But they also can go deep because they understand that the product's true value lies in the details of its interactions and every touchpoint that a consumer has with it.

   We've progressed from a society of farmers to a society of factory workers to a society of knowledge workers. And now we're progressing yet again—to a society of creators and empathizers, of pattern recognizers and meaning makers. We've moved from an economy built on people's backs to an economy built on people's left-brains to what is emerging today: an economy and society built more and more on people's right-brains.

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