Mapmakers
3.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Mapmakers
All the good stuff about Traveling: mental, virtual and real life Maps of Worlds where no one has gone before ...
Curated by Peter Hoeve
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter Hoeve
Scoop.it!

Where Gladwell gets Wrong: the Real Problem is Scale Mismatch - Zeynep Tufekci @TechSoc

Where Gladwell gets Wrong: the Real Problem is Scale Mismatch - Zeynep Tufekci @TechSoc | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

The main problems facing humanity today are climate change, resource depletion, economic devastation, environmental destruction and for those unfortunate to be living in particular regions of the world, war, epidemics, and dire poverty.

 

And all these main problems are global in scale and just cannot be affected at the local level.

 

The race-to-the-bottom structure that has been enacted through decades of neoliberal policies has effectively freed the powerful from constraints at the local level.

 

Our sociality tends to be local the scale of the action required to confront today’s problems is global.

 

What we need is simultaneous action for citizen-powered mandates on state and corporate conduct. That should wipe a few grins off smug faces. Does anyone imagine we can organize something on that global scale without the Internet? Let me know.

 

Article Gladwell: http://nyr.kr/9Y92DZ .

Article Granovetter - The Strength of Weak Ties: http://bit.ly/Ue3Raf .

 
Peter Hoeve's insight:

This crystal clear review on best seller SM authors as Gladwell and Shirky AND on the Sociological Network Theory of Granovetter on the Strength of Weak Ties, makes the reader aware of the existence of great minds as Tufekci.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Hoeve
Scoop.it!

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends - Part 1 - Daniel Burrus

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends - Part 1 - Daniel Burrus | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

Your company can’t survive without technology. And these days, even non-technical employees know that technology goes way beyond desktop computers and networks. To stay competitive, your organization needs to anticipate the most significant technology trends that are shaping your business and then develop innovative ways to use them to your advantage both inside and outside of your organization. Over the next five short years these 20 game-changing technologies will transform how we sell, market, communicate, collaborate, educate, train, innovate, and much more. Take some time to digest this well ...

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Hoeve
Scoop.it!

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends - Part 2 - Daniel Burrus

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends - Part 2 - Daniel Burrus | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

In Part 1 I shared 10 of my Top 20 Game-Changing Technology-Driven Trends that will cause both disruption and opportunity on a global level. In this Part 2, I bring you 10 additional trends to complete the list. Remember, to stay competitive, your organization needs to anticipate the technology trends that are shaping your business and then develop innovative ways to use them to your advantage in your organization. Use this list as a roadmap to be pre-active and determine how your company can profit from these trends now and in the future.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Hoeve
Scoop.it!

Trade patterns for Obsidian played key role in Maya Collapse - Mark Golitko c.s.

Trade patterns for Obsidian played key role in Maya Collapse - Mark Golitko c.s. | Mapmakers | Scoop.it
Shifts in exchange patterns provide a new perspective on the fall of inland Maya centers in Mesoamerica approximately 1,000 years ago.

   Related reading on the Obsidian Trail: http://phys.org/news164896641.html

   Related reading on Maya Collapse: http://phys.org/news/2012-02-maya-civilization-collapse-modest-rainfall.html

   For the Maya, who did not have metal tools, obsidian (or volcanic glass) was highly valued because of its sharp edges for use as cutting instruments. Maya lords and other elites derived power from controlling access to obsidian, which could be traded for important goods or sent as gifts to foster important relationships with other Mayan leaders.

   The Field Museum researchers found that prior to the fall of the Maya inland centers, obsidian tended to flow along inland riverine networks. But over time, this material began to be transported through coastal trade networks instead, with a corresponding increase in coastal centers' prominence as inland centers declined.

   The shift in trade might have involved more than obsidian. Field researcher Mark Golitko said, "The implication is that other valuable goods important to these inland centers were also slowly being cut off." Golitko led the Social Network Analysis that graphically depicts the change in trade patterns.

 
more...
No comment yet.