Mapmakers
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Mapmakers
All the good stuff about Traveling: mental, virtual and real life Maps of Worlds where no one has gone before ...
Curated by Peter Hoeve
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Your body language shapes who you are [TED] - Amy Cuddy

Your body language shapes who you are [TED] - Amy Cuddy | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

   Amy Cuddy wasn’t supposed to become a successful scientist. In fact, she wasn’t even supposed to finish her undergraduate degree. Early in her college career, Cuddy suffered a severe head injury in a car accident, and doctors said she would struggle to fully regain her mental capacity and finish her undergraduate degree.

   But she proved them wrong. Today, Cuddy is a professor and researcher at Harvard Business School, where she studies how nonverbal behavior and snap judgments affect people from the classroom to the boardroom. And her training as a classical dancer (another skill she regained after her injury) is evident in her fascinating work on "power posing" -- how your body position influences others and even your own brain.

   “Don't fake it till you make it. Fake it till you become it.” Amy Cuddy’s research on body language reveals that we can change other people’s perceptions — and even our own body chemistry — simply by changing body positions. "Using a few simple tweaks to body language, Harvard researcher Amy Cuddy discovers ways to help people become more powerful."

 

Direct Link to Amy's TED Talk: http://bit.ly/VjrPRu .

 
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Me, Myself, Us - NN

Me, Myself, Us - NN | Mapmakers | Scoop.it

   What’s a man? Or, indeed, a woman? Biologically, the answer might seem obvious. A human being is an individual who has grown from a fertilised egg which contained genes from both father and mother.

   A growing band of biologists, however, think this definition incomplete. They see people not just as individuals, but also as ecosystems. In their view, the descendant of the fertilised egg is merely one component of the system.

 

   The others are trillions of bacteria, each equally an individual, which are found in a person’s gut, his mouth, his scalp, his skin and all of the crevices and orifices that subtend from his body’s surface.

   A healthy adult human harbours some 100 trillion bacteria in his gut alone. That is ten times as many bacterial cells as he has cells descended from the sperm and egg of his parents. These bugs, moreover, are diverse.

   Egg and sperm provide about 23,000 different genes. The microbiome, as the body’s commensal bacteria are collectively known, is reckoned to have around 3m. Admittedly, many of those millions are variations on common themes, but equally many are not, and even the number of those that are adds something to the body’s genetic mix.

 
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