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Corpus Linguistics: Method, theory and practice

Corpus Linguistics: Method, theory and practice | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

// source URL: http://www.marianne.net/Le-neoliberalisme-ne-tiendra-plus-tres-longtemps_a235737.html


Via Jersus Colmenares
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Verb Phrase book published

Verb Phrase book published | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

The grammar of English is often thought to be stable over time. However a new book, edited by Bas Aarts, Joanne Close, Geoffrey Leech and Sean Wallis, The Verb Phrase in English: investigating recent language change with corpora (Cambridge University Press, 2013) presents a body of research from linguists that shows that using natural language corpora one can find changes within a core element of grammar, the Verb Phrase, over a span of decades rather than centuries.

 

The book draws from papers first presented at a symposium on the verb phrase organised for the Survey of English Usage’s 50th anniversary and on research from the Changing English Verb Phrase project.

 

 

- A methodological range

 

This collection of corpus linguistics studies offers the reader a range of methodological perspectives from linguists such as Doug Biber, Geoffrey Leech and Mark Davies, who present data in terms of frequencies per million words (pmw), to sociolinguists like Sali Tagliamonte and others who operate in a variationist paradgim, who frame their research questions in terms of probabilities of a particular choice.

 

Chapter 2, by Bas Aarts, Jo Close and myself, discusses why a focus on choice is to be preferred if possible, while exploring how corpus experimental designs can be refined in a series of steps. Papers were shared between authors and not all concurred, ensuring a lively and occasionally controversial ‘edge’ to some of the contributions. The volume is of interest on the basis of its subject matter, but also as a  ‘state of art’ conversation about methodology between contemporary corpus linguists.

 

 

- Statistical methods used

 

Papers employ a number of statistical methods discussed in corp.ling.stats, including:

Wilson score interval

Newcombe-Wilson interval

Chi-square type tests

Measures of association

 

 

- Citation

 

Aarts, B., Close, J, Leech, G. and Wallis, S.A. (eds.) The Verb Phrase in English: Investigating recent language change with corpora. Cambridge: CUP.

 

 

- More information

 

Table of contents and ordering info:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/english-usage/projects/verb-phrase/book/

 

 


Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes, oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, February 19, 2013 2:20 PM

Thanks to Costas Gabrielatos.

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World Maps of Language Families

World Maps of Language Families | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
For teaching a class on the history and geography of the world’s major language families, good linguistic maps are essential. Unfortunately, serviceable maps that depict only language families are difficult to find.

 

 


Via Athanasios Karavasilis
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Online Etymology Dictionary

Online Etymology Dictionary | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

// quoted by oAnth - source URL -- http://www.etymonline.com/abbr.php?

 

[...]

 

This project began after I looked for a free dictionary of word origins online and found none. You could subscribe to the Oxford English Dictionary for $550 a year. [As of January 2004, OED Online is now available by annual subscription to individuals for $295 a year, and has recently introduced monthly subscriptions for $29.95.] There were free dictionaries with definitions, some lists of slang words and their supposed sources, and some sites that listed a few dozen of the strangest etymologies. There were message boards where you could submit a question and wait a few days or weeks for an expert to answer. Or not. But there was no comprehensive public dictionary of the histories of words we use every day -- words like the and day.

No university had seen fit to shackle its graduate students to the cyber-mill, grinding out an online etymology dictionary. I had time on my hands then, and I decided to do it. I also did this to increase my understanding of the language, and its ancestors and relatives. As a writer and editor with an amateur's passion for linguistics, I took this as a joy ride more than drudgery. And I know so much more useless trivia than I did when I started (applaud is related to explode; three people can have a dialogue; and if anyone calls you feisty, slug him).

Etymologies are not definitions; they're explanations of what our words meant 600 or 2,000 years ago. Think of it as looking at pictures of your friends' parents when they were your age. People will continue to use words as they will, finding wider meanings for old words and coining new ones to fit new situations. In fact, this list is a testimony to that process.

These are histories of words only, not things or ideas. The modern word for something might have replaced old, forgotten words for the same object or concept. (Where possible, I've tried to indicate that.)

 

[...]


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subrealism: the biological origin of linguistic diversity

subrealism: the biological origin of linguistic diversity | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Just as reading relies on neural mechanisms that pre-date the emergence of writing [17], so perhaps language has evolved to rely on pre-existing brain systems. However, there is more agreement about the origin of linguistic ...

Via Athanasios Karavasilis, oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
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oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s curator insight, March 10, 2013 9:52 PM

[...]

 

plosone - http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048029

 

(Abstract) In contrast with animal communication systems, diversity is characteristic of almost every aspect of human language. Languages variously employ tones, clicks, or manual signs to signal differences in meaning; some languages lack the noun-verb distinction (e.g., Straits Salish), whereas others have a proliferation of fine-grained syntactic categories (e.g., Tzeltal); and some languages do without morphology (e.g., Mandarin), while others pack a whole sentence into a single word (e.g., Cayuga). A challenge for evolutionary biology is to reconcile the diversity of languages with the high degree of biological uniformity of their speakers. Here, we model processes of language change and geographical dispersion and find a consistent pressure for flexible learning, irrespective of the language being spoken. This pressure arises because flexible learners can best cope with the observed high rates of linguistic change associated with divergent cultural evolution following human migration. Thus, rather than genetic adaptations for specific aspects of language, such as recursion, the coevolution of genes and fast-changing linguistic structure provides the biological basis for linguistic diversity. Only biological adaptations for flexible learning combined with cultural evolution can explain how each child has the potential to learn any human language.

 

[...]

 

http://subrealism.blogspot.de/2013/03/the-biological-origin-of-linguistic.html

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A short intro to Corpus Linguistics

A short intro to Corpus Linguistics | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

What is Corpus Linguistics?
Corpus linguistics is the use of digitalized text (corpus) or texts, usually naturally occurring material, in the analysis of language (linguistics). Techniques used include generating frequency word lists, concordance lines (keyword in context or KWIC), collocate, cluster and keyness lists. The plural of corpus is corpora.

 

What does one need to do corpus linguistics?
A personal computer (Windows, MAC, Linux, etc) is usually enough for small corpora. With it one can use a concordance program or concordancer to analyse plain-text files (extension “.txt”).

 

What does one need to know to do corpus linguistics?
To know the language you want to study is, of course, important. You also need to know some of the basic ideas in corpus linguistics, such as word list, frequency, type, token and concordance. Since these are the most basic and important concepts let us have a quick look at them.

 

The first thing you would want to do is make a word list. It is usually arranged from highest to lowest frequency of types. A type is a unique form of a word. A “word“ is defined as running letters separated by space or punctuation. Thus the sentence:


“To be or not to be; that is the question.“

 

[...]

 

 


Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes, oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
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The Scandinavian influence on Anglo-Saxon language and culture, and its parallels with the Dutch influence on American English

The Scandinavian influence on Anglo-Saxon language and culture, and its parallels with the Dutch influence on American English | manually by oAnth - from its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Taking a break from the Songs of the Day to post one of my uni essays! This is a short essay I wrote for a first-year Sociolinguistics class.
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During the period between the eight and eleventh...

 

 

 

 


Via Athanasios Karavasilis
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