Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation
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Kiribati and Climate Change

You might not be feeling the effects of climate change, but Kiribati, a small country in the Pacific, is actually drowning because of rising sea levels. Check out how the government there is trying to run a country that might not exist in a few years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Fred Issa's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:39 PM

The people who do not agree that Climate change is real, need to look further than their own neighborhoods for proof that it is real. This really blew me away. Entire island populations that have to relocate to other islands, as their home island of Kiribati continues to sink lower and lower until you are walking in water when the high tide comes in? Imagine that the highest reference point on your island or chain of islands is your town's dump? What is positive about these people's plight is that they are being trained professionally in much needed fields, and second is that they are openly welcomed to other nearby islands. Fred Issa,

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:15 PM

this is an example of a small, innocent nation being hit harder by something caused by large nations which are having no negative impact on them. these large nations will not take responsibility until they must face the same results as Kiribati.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:07 PM

The video explains how the volcanic island will eventually disappear. The reason that the island will disappear is because of erosion and the sea is eating away at it. What makes them so easy to erode is the fact that the volcanoes are no longer active. Soon, coral reefs that are created will be the only thing holding the island together. Most of the island will be destroyed eventually and what is left behind will be in the shape of a caldera. 

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The Future of Water by Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy

The Future of Water by Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
A leading global water professional,...
Carlos Fosca's insight:

El Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy, experto mundial en la gestión del agua en medios urbanos y promotor del uso eficiente del mismo como elemento clave para las ciudades de futuro estará en el Perú invitado por la PUCP para participar en la COP 20. 

Es muy importante que tomemos consciencia de la urgencia de planifica adecuadamente la gestión del agua alrededor de nuestras ciudades especialmente de aquellas como Lima que siguen creciendo en el desierto.

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The new water technologies that could save the planet

The new water technologies that could save the planet | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
What are the new and emerging technologies that will help business overcome the scarcity of clean, fresh water?
Carlos Fosca's insight:

Filtración a través de Nanoteconología, membranas químicas, desalinización de agua de mar a través de principios biomiméticos de la propia naturaleza, monitoreo inteligente a través de sensores inalámbricos, procesamiento de aguas residuales empleando digestores de lodos activados, instalaciones móviles para el tratamiento del agua son algunas de las tendencias tecnológicas que podrían en el futuro reducir de manera sensible los costos del acceso a agua potable para la población mundial. 

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Integrated Urban Water Management By Dr. Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy

Stockholm, 29 August 2014.
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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security