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The-Neuroscience-of-Learning

"Learning is a critical organizational competency—so much so that Arie De Geus’ statement has become almost a truism today. Yet, most organizations do not effectively build this competency at an organizational or individual level. A study of the effectiveness of organizational training conducted by Cross (2002) concluded that only 10 to 20 percent of formal organizational training transfers to the job. On the other hand, informal learning—which accounts for at least 80 percent of organizational learning—and is the very essence of the learning that de Geus is referring to—happens in an ad hoc manner, without design or strategy"

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How to Use Brain Science to Increase Engagement

How to Use Brain Science to Increase Engagement | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
The rapidly evolving world of neuroscience has given us solid scientific confirmation of what most engagement leadership practitioners have known intuitively for many years. That, not surprisingly, there is a direct link between how our brains operate and the level of engagement we experience, whether we are impacted by our work in a positive or negative way. If engagement is a state of higher stimulation with, satisfaction from, and deeper emotional connection with our work, our co-workers and
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Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair

Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Not only does the study by Simone Kühn of Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Charité University Medicine show us that brain connectivity can be dramatically improved by gaming but the recent Berlin study (titled ‘Playing Super Mario Induces Structural Brain Plasticity: Gray Matter Changes Resulting from Training with a Commercial Video Game’) also shows that the use of video games from a young age can also increase neurogenesis, which is the very important process of growing new neurons in the brain.

As a result, the size of a child’s brain can be directly linked to early life stimulation such as video games and education. The results of this study can also be applied to explore the subject of brain plasticity and cognitive aging.
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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Earl Miller, a neuroscientist at MIT and one of the world experts on divided attention, says that our brains are “not wired to multitask well… When people think they’re multitasking, they’re actually just switching from one task to another very rapidly. And every time they do, there’s a cognitive cost in doing so.” So we’re not actually keeping a lot of balls in the air like an expert juggler; we’re more like a bad amateur plate spinner, frantically switching from one task to another, ignoring the one that is not right in front of us but worried it will come crashing down any minute. Even though we think we’re getting a lot done, ironically, multitasking makes us demonstrably less efficient.
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New insights into how the brain stays bright

New insights into how the brain stays bright | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
A healthy adult brain accounts for about 2 percent of a healthy person’s weight, and it consumes about 20 percent of all the energy that person’s body uses. That’s a lot of sugar getting burned up in your head, and here’s why: Incessant chit-chat throughout the brain’s staggeringly complex circuitry. A single nerve cell (of the brain’s estimated 100 billion) may communicate directly with as many as a million others, with the median in the vicinity of 10,000.

To transmit signals to one another, nerve cells release specialized chemicals called neurotransmitters into small gaps called synapses that separate one nerve cell in a circuit from the next. The firing patterns of our synapses underwrite our consciousness, emotions and behavior. The simple act of tasting a doughnut requires millions of simultaneous and precise synaptic firing events throughout the brain and, in turn, precisely coordinated timing of neurotransmitter release.
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Brain Based Learning

Brain Based Learning | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it

"The human brain is designed to survive only. People, children, students, do what they have to do to survive. This is reflected in all areas: social, economic, physical, intellectual and emotional. If you need information or knowledge we acquire, if not relevant or important to discard it, or you do not pay attention. Students come with a survival-oriented school and is in the hands of educators create conditions for their brains to select the learning more relevant to their chances of survival equipment conditions".

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Research shows insight into learning and memory

Research shows insight into learning and memory | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it

"How does the hippocampus drive learning and memory? It is believed that stimuli from the external world leave behind physical traces in the brain known as “engrams”. By reactivating engram-bearing neurons that code for specific stimuli, the brain can perform memory recall. Although learning and memory are primarily associated with the hippocampus, some researchers have suggested that engram cells may be in the cortex as well. Thus, learning and memory are not localized to a single region of the brain but rather encompass a widely distributed hippocampal-cortical network. However, how the hippocampus interacts with the cortex to drive memory functions remains unclear."

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The Big Future: Can we build a better brain?

The Big Future: Can we build a better brain? | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
How will the future change the human brain? This week's Big Future takes a look at a new wave of neurological techniques that directly alter the brain's electrical patterns, correcting seizures and movement disorders. Some doctors are even experimenting with using it to treat depression. Could the same technology be used to correct more fundamental mental properties like attention span? We're still early in the research, but there are already plenty of projects aiming to give human beings greater control over the inner workings of the brain.
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Decision Making and Instincts: Is your brain or gut more powerful?

Decision Making and Instincts: Is your brain or gut more powerful? | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Hindsight Insight: Everything is Obvious When You Know the AnswerYour sixth sense, intuition, clairvoyance, internal compass, or just plain wisdom.It doesn’t matter what you call it, gut feelings can
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Strategic Thinking? In the face of uncertainty, the brain chooses randomness as the best strategy

Strategic Thinking? In the face of uncertainty, the brain chooses randomness as the best strategy | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
The brain excels at integrating information from past experiences to guide decision-making in new situations. But in certain circumstances, random behavior may be preferable. An animal might have the best chance of avoiding a predator if it moves unpredictably, for example. And in a new environment, unrestricted exploration might make more sense than relying on an internal model developed elsewhere. So scientists have long speculated that the brain may have a way to switch off the influence of past experiences so that behavior can proceed randomly, Karpova says. But others disagreed. "They argue that it's inefficient, and that it would be at odds with what some people call one of the most central operating principles of the brain – to use our past experience and knowledge to optimize behavioral choices," she notes.
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How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression

How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Physical exercise has many beneficial effects on human health, including the protection from stress-induced depression. However, until now the mechanisms that mediate this protective effect have been unknown.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, David McGavock
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David McGavock's curator insight, September 27, 2014 11:44 AM

Provides some explanation on the chemistry of depression and protective factors generated through exercise.

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Brainy processing at your fingertips

Brainy processing at your fingertips | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
New research shows that nerve endings in the fingertips perform neural computations that were thought to occur in the brain. Continue reading...
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Ray Kurzweil: “Get ready for hybrid thinking”

Ray Kurzweil: “Get ready for hybrid thinking” | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
TED | Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a new brain feature: the neocortex. This stamp-sized piece of tissue, wrapped around a
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What are the rules your brain works by?

What are the rules your brain works by? | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about What are the rules your brain works by?
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Boosting the Brain’s Creative Powers & Creating the Best Environment for Innovation

Boosting the Brain’s Creative Powers & Creating the Best Environment for Innovation | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
An area of brain research that reveals our capacity for learning creative thinking is the growing evidence that the brain is in fact plastic (Norman Doidge’s book ‘The Brain that Changes Itself’, 2007, is a great introduction to this concept). Apparently the brain is not completely wired with location-specific neural pathways that are preset according to genetic coding and then established for life. Accumulated research supports the idea that it is possible to ‘rewire’ the brain at any stage in life to form new and varied connections.
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The Brain: Consciousness and Creativity

The Brain: Consciousness and Creativity | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
In this video Dr. Heather Berlin gives us a basic primer of consciousness and creativity. Dr Berlin is a cognitive neuroscientist and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuro...
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A Brain-Computer Interface That Works Wirelessly

A Brain-Computer Interface That Works Wirelessly | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
A few paralyzed patients could soon be using a wireless brain-computer interface able to stream their thought commands as quickly as a home Internet connection.

After more than a decade of engineering work, researchers at Brown University and a Utah company, Blackrock Microsystems, have commercialized a wireless device that can be attached to a person’s skull and transmit via radio thought commands collected from a brain implant. Blackrock says it will seek clearance for the system from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, so that the mental remote control can be tested in volunteers, possibly as soon as this year.
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How To Build One Brain-Boosting Habit In 2015

How To Build One Brain-Boosting Habit In 2015 | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it

We never stop learning. But unlike our school days, when our brain is constantly challenged and exercised to become better, our adult lives don't make time for this. In 2015, give your brain a boost. It's easier than you think and takes only a few minutes of your life each day


Via Nik Peachey
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tom cockburn's curator insight, December 24, 2014 6:08 AM
Worth a try
Johan van der Merwe's curator insight, December 25, 2014 12:41 PM

Might be useful for reading

 

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, December 26, 2014 9:53 PM

Some great habits to pick in the new year. 

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What Happens To Your Brain When You're Having A Brilliant Idea

What Happens To Your Brain When You're Having A Brilliant Idea | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
In the 1990s, cognitive scientists John Kounios and Mark Beeman started studying the insightful moment when you’re suddenly able to see things differently, also known as the “aha!” or eureka moment.

This moment occurs when you go from being stuck on a problem to having the ability to reinterpret a “stimulus, situation, or event to produce a nonobvious, nondominant interpretation.”
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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.
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Neurogenesis: state of the field and implications for education

Neurogenesis: state of the field and implications for education | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
One specific aspect of neuroplasticity that has received much attention over the past two decades is adult neurogenesis – the notion that new neurons can be produced in an adult brain. Until the mid-1960s it was firmly believed that neurogenesis in mammals ends in the period just after birth. Technological developments in the 1990s led to an ongoing period of intensive research in this area, and it is now well-established that every day thousands of new neurons are produced in the adult mammalian brain (Cameron and McKay, 2001; Spalding et al., 2013). Many of these new neurons are produced within a region of the brain called the hippocampus, which has long been established as being critical for learning and memory processes.
Carlos Fosca's insight:

"One very interesting aspect of neurogenesis is that it is highly responsive to environmental influences, some of which are described below. A number of simple factors have been shown to enhance neurogenesis. Less research has been done on the specific knock-on effects of increased neurogenesis on cognition, but some promising initial studies have been performed"

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Multitasking Damages Your Brain And Career, New Studies Suggest

Multitasking Damages Your Brain And Career, New Studies Suggest | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
People who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.
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