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Big nanotech: an unexpected future.

Big nanotech: an unexpected future. | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
How we deal with atomically precise manufacturing will reframe the future for human life and global society In my initial post in this series, I asked, "What if nanotechnology could deliver on its original promise, not only new, useful, nanoscale...
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The technology that puts the human touch into prostheses

The technology that puts the human touch into prostheses | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
The touch-sensitive technology used in smartphones is helping to create a revolution in artificial limbs Being able to put your arm around the shoulder of a friend who is upset and giving them a squeeze may not seem like a significant skill, but it...
Carlos Fosca's insight:

"..Being able to put your arm around the shoulder of a friend who is upset and giving them a squeeze may not seem like a significant skill, but it is. Most humans are so good at judging the level of force they exert on others that accidently crushing or bashing someone in such a situation is rarely a problem. For amputees fitted with prostheses such things are not so easy. What they need, of course is that their artificial limbs should have a sense of touch. And that may soon be possible, thanks to some astonishing experiments carried out by a group based at the University of Chicago"...

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'Born-to-die': this device will self-destruct in 60 seconds

'Born-to-die': this device will self-destruct in 60 seconds | Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation | Scoop.it
Electronic devices that biodegrade to order could lead to huge medical advances.
Carlos Fosca's insight:

"..In 2012 an electronic device was implanted in the body of a mouse and powered wirelessly. The device was able to produce enough heat to kill off the bacteria that cause post-surgery infections. It lasted two weeks and then dissolved into the mouse's bodily fluids with no obvious side-effects for the mouse..."

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