Managing Natural hazards
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Magma Beneath Mount St. Helen Is Definitely Rising

Magma Beneath Mount St. Helen Is Definitely Rising | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
The U.S. Geological Survey said on Wednesday that the reservoir of magma beneath Mount St. Helens, a Washington volcano that killed 57 people when it erupted in 1980, is "slowly re-pressurizing." 

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Countries must improve resilience to disasters or face ... - OECD

Countries must improve resilience to disasters or face ... - OECD | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
05/05/2014 - Smarter planning for natural and man-made disasters that increases collaboration between countries and encourages households and businesses to take more responsibility would improve resilience and reduce future economic ...
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6 Tiny Computer Glitches That Caused Huge Disasters (Part 2 ...

6 Tiny Computer Glitches That Caused Huge Disasters (Part 2 ... | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
The line between 'computerized utopia of the future' and 'utter chaos' is just a line of computer code.
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Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International

Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Disasters, whether natural or manmade, are on the increase. Of this there is no doubt: in the 1970s, there were 90 disasters a year; in 2014 there will be almost 450. Nine out of 10 of these will be in developing countries least able to cope with ...
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Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International

Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Disasters, whether natural or manmade, are on the increase. Of this there is no doubt: in the 1970s, there were 90 disasters a year; in 2014 there will be almost 450. Nine out of 10 of these will be in developing countries least able to cope with ...
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25 Worst Natural Disasters Ever Recorded

Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/Fb3GE The world has witnessed numerous disasters over the centuries and although most are man-made due to wars an...
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Population Patterns and Vulnerability to Climate Hazards - NYTimes ...

Population Patterns and Vulnerability to Climate Hazards - NYTimes ... | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
High fertility rates and an urban rush in poor places vulnerable to climate threats spell trouble.
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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon, Kylie Taylor
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Mental Scars Run Deep Years After BP Spill: Op-Ed - Yahoo! News

Mental Scars Run Deep Years After BP Spill: Op-Ed - Yahoo! News | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Mental Scars Run Deep Years After BP Spill: Op-Ed
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Coral Reefs Reduce Risks Posed by Storms, Rising Water by 97 Percent

Coral Reefs Reduce Risks Posed by Storms, Rising Water by 97 Percent | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
A new study in Nature Communications provides the first global analysis of how coral reefs reduce risk from storms, flooding and sea level rise. (RT @ramal1967: Great Infographic from @pewenvironment #CoralReefs reduce wave energy & height?
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These Origami-Inspired Houses Pop Up In Disasters | Co.Exist ...

These Origami-Inspired Houses Pop Up In Disasters | Co.Exist ... | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
These Origami-Inspired Houses Pop Up In Disasters. In post-tsunami Japan, one important lesson was that, after basic needs like eating and drinking were fulfilled, refugees most hungered for privacy and intimacy.
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Local govts should not hesitate to issue evacuation warnings - The Japan News

Local govts should not hesitate to issue evacuation warnings - The Japan News | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Local govts should not hesitate to issue evacuation warnings
The Japan News
We hope local governments will quickly work to create criteria appropriate for their areas' geographical features and the distribution of their residents.
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Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International

Disasters put girls at double risk | Plan EU Office – Plan International | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Disasters, whether natural or manmade, are on the increase. Of this there is no doubt: in the 1970s, there were 90 disasters a year; in 2014 there will be almost 450. Nine out of 10 of these will be in developing countries least able to cope with ...
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Deadly Disasters : Documentary on the Increasing Frequency of Earth's Natural Disasters

Deadly Disasters : Documentary on the Increasing Frequency of Earth's Natural Disasters . 2013 This documentary as well as the rest of these documentaries sh...
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Shock and Sadness! Craziest Disasters

Shock and Sadness! Craziest Disasters | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
The most insane natural and man-made disasters the earth has ever experienced. Are we doomed? (Pictures of the worst disasters in the world; is mankind doomed?
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Teen's interactive movie promotes disaster 'resilience' - E&T magazine

Teen's interactive movie promotes disaster 'resilience' - E&T magazine | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
E&T magazine Teen's interactive movie promotes disaster 'resilience' E&T magazine The stop-motion film is the centrepiece of a British Red Cross campaign to help people understand the importance of 'resilience' – the ability to prepare for,...
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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

Rescooped by Kylie Taylor from Geography Education
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Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

Via Seth Dixon
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James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:09 PM

Similar to the Aral Sea,  the Tigris and Euphrates river basins have become drier and drier between 2003 and 2009. It is important to see all the aspects that have caused the rive to dry out and its do to there own people in this region. About 60 percent of the loss was attributed to the pumping of groundwater from underground reservoirs. Most of the problems are due to that about one-fifth of the water losses came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought. These could be some of the environmental issues but also there has been tremendous population increases in this region. This water is perfect drinking water for the people of South East Asia and the countries surrounding it but numbers are extremely high. 

It is important to analyze how us humans can change the geography of a certain area in such little time. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

The middle east has lost a huge portion of its freshwater over the past decade. The two natural-color images above were acquired by the Landsat satellites and show the shrinking of the Qadisiyah Reservoir in Iraq between September 7, 2006 and September 15, 2009. The first graph shows the elevation of the water in that reservoir between January 2003 and December 2009. The second graph shows water storage from January 2003 to December 2009. Obtaining ground data information in the middle east can be difficult.The researchers calculated that about one-fifth of the water losses in their Tigris-Euphrates study region came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought.

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Social media and disasters: When a small post can spur hope

Social media and disasters: When a small post can spur hope | Managing Natural hazards | Scoop.it
When social media is used during disasters, it can save lives and ease communities.

Via Alan Horton
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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 2015 9:46 PM

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:33 AM

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:18 PM

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.