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Management Is (Still) Not Leadership

Management Is (Still) Not Leadership | Management Project | Scoop.it
After years of debate, people still confuse these ideas - at their peril.
Michael Pash's insight:

This article shows the "crucial" difference between management and leadership, and how it is a common mistake by many people to confuse the two terms. It teaches us that there are many errors made between management and leadership. The first one is the confusion of the terms. The second is the use the term "leadership" referring to the people at the very top of hierarchies.Then claiming  the people in the layers below them to be involved in the management department. And then saying that the rest are workers, specialists, and individual contributors. This is a widely common mistake that gets the two ideas confused. The third mistake is thinking of "leadership" in terms of personality characteristics. Since few people have great personality, this leads logically to the conclusion that few people can provide leadership, which gets us into increasing trouble. 


It also stessed the difference between the two, not just common confusion. According to the article, management is a set of well-known processes, like planning, budgeting, structuring jobs, staffing jobs, measuring performance and problem-solving. On the other hand, leadership is about vision. It is  associated with taking an organization into the future, finding opportunities that are coming at it faster and faster and successfully exploiting those opportunities.


Kotter, John. "Management is (Still) Not Leadership." http://blogs.hbr.org. Harvard Business Review. 10 Jan 2013. Web. 13 Jan 2013. 

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victoria knapik's comment, January 13, 2013 11:21 PM
What is the difference between management and leadership? For those of you that don't know, Michael gave a very descriptive summary of how the two of these terms are different. Michael made it very clear and easy to read how different they are. I learned a few differences between the two just ready his short summary about the article. I like the way Michael didn't put all the information all at once. He put it all in an orderly fashion and had it very organized. I enjoyed reading this because it brought my attention. I was at the edge of my seat because I wanted to know what else was going to be listed. It was a great summary and Michael a phenomenal job contrasting the two. This article was one of my favorite that Michael chose so it was interesting for me to read more about. Overall, I like how he took time and did his work well.
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Jenkins: Al Gore Is Good at Rent-Seeking (and Microsoft Isn't)

Jenkins: Al Gore Is Good at Rent-Seeking (and Microsoft Isn't) | Management Project | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Business World columnist Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. writes that Current TV may not have been a success, but the ex-vice president's style of entrepreneurship is in vogue.
Michael Pash's insight:

The article describes how CEO of Current TV, Al Gore, managed sell the network to Al-Jezeera for $70-100 million despite that the fact that the network does not have very many viewers and its ad revenue is rather small. Instead of creating value in the company through expanding viewership which the channel could use to ask for more money from cable networks, Gore chose to build the brand of the channel.  Despite low viewership, Gore positioned the channel to be one the few channles that was well respected among the intelligensia and one of the few to be relatively free of partisonship.  The sale of the channel to Al-Jezeera is shows that value in a company does not necessarily have to come from how profitable the company is.  The article suggests that Gore knew he could not make much money with the channel but through his connections in government and world leaders, he could effectiely build the brand of the channel into something people around the world would respect. I enjoyed reading this article and I though that it was well written and thought out well. It was interesting to learn more about this sale by Al Gore and how he accomplished it.   

 

 

Jenkins, Holman W. "Al Gore Is Good at Rent-Seeking (and Microsoft Isn't)."Online.wsj.com. The Wall Street Journal, 4 January 2013. Web. 6 January 2013. 

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Buffett Says Pricing Power More Important Than Good Management

Buffett Says Pricing Power More Important Than Good Management | Management Project | Scoop.it
Warren Buffett , the billionaire chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. , said he rates businesses on their ability to raise prices and sometimes doesn’t even consider the people in charge.
Michael Pash's insight:

Perhaps one of the greatest business leaders of all time says in this article that in a fundementally unprofitable business, no one, not even very intelligent, experienced and talented managers can a make the company profitable.  On the other hand, if a company exists in an area where there is little or no competition, the company does not have to have very skilled managers to make the busines profitable. Good managers will simply make the company even more profitable.  But in company where there is lots of competition or where profit margins are very slim or nonexistent, the best managers will not be able to make the company profitable.  Buffett seems to be reacting to notion that some companies need only to shake up management in order to return to profitability.  Buffett somewhat pessimistically thinks that some companies and markets may no longer or ever be profitable. I found this article quite interesting. Although, I do not have an opinion either favorably or negatively, I see the logic that comes with Buffet's idea, and I think it makes a great deal of sense.  

 

 

Frye, Andrew & Dakin, Campell. "Buffett Says Pricing Power More Important Than Good Management." www.bloomberg.com. Bloomberg. 18 Feb 2011. Web. 19 Dec 2012. 

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Steve Jobs - Lessons in Management - Biography.com

Steve Jobs - Lessons in Management - Biography.com | Management Project | Scoop.it
Biographer Walter Isaacson, author of "Steve Jobs," describes Steve Jobs' passion and dedication to a product and how that affected his management style. Video courtesy of Simon & Schuster © 2012.
Michael Pash's insight:

While a corporate manager usulally has one job, charting the direction of the corporation through making many numberous important decisions , the exceptional Steve Jobs had the role of both a CEO and one to come up with the creative ideas that eventually become quite successful. This video talks about two of Jobs' execptional qualities. According to the video, Jobs was successful as a leader because of the ideas he brought to Appple.  He came up with a number of great innovations as a CEO of Apple.  But equally important to his ideas and innovations was the passion that he brought to brining these ideas, which eventually became products, to fruition.  Many successful corporations have leaders who have one or the other of these qualities.  It is not necessary for a corporation to thrive if its leader does not have both.  But the chief reason Apple has been wildly successful over the past 40 year is that it had Jobs not only as its CEO but its primary innovator.  

I found this video very interesting and well-done. It displayed good points that defined a successful manger, and of course these points can show the success of a man like Steve Jobs. 

 

 

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"Entrepreneurs are crazy" and that's a good thing - Fortune Management

"Entrepreneurs are crazy" and that's a good thing - Fortune Management | Management Project | Scoop.it
Author Steve Blank, who is widely credited for helping launch the lean startup movement, is not shy about his opinions.
Michael Pash's insight:

The article discusses with a noted expert on entrepreneurs how successful entrepeneurs today must be more like crazed artists rather than business school graduates. The author, Steve Blank, explains that an extremely successful entrepreneur usually has a vision to create something out of nothing and allowing absolutely no obsticles get in the way of the idea. Addtionally in order to make the dream or vision a reality, it is most likely to take a tremendous amount of effort and time.  Blank also mentions that not every entrepenuer will be a fantastic success.  Even those who do do everything to bring a great ideal to the market may not be wildly successful.  He cautions many people not to think that they will be the next Mark Zuckerberg. I found this article interesting and I thought that the information in it opened a entirely different idea, showing that entrepreneurship takes a certain kind of person, and that it is not a very glamorous job all the time.

 

Wagner, Kurt. "'Entrepreneurs are crazy' and that's a good thing."CNN.com. CNN, 14 December 2012. Web. 6 January 2012. 

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How Social Media Turns Your Employees Into a PR Army

How Social Media Turns Your Employees Into a PR Army | Management Project | Scoop.it
Leveraging employee PR power is no groundbreaking concept, but its potential is higher than ever thanks to social media, says HootSuite CEO Ryan Holmes.
Michael Pash's insight:

This article is excellent. It teaches the fundemental ways to be successful in getting your company well-known through today's popular social media websites, such as Facebook, but especially Twitter. THe first point it makes is that using Twitter by tweeting about your company, and others retweeting those tweets, can create more followers and fans of the company. The article stresses the key of collaboration and dedicated, skilled teamwork in a company in order to be successful. The article also explains that with Twitter a company's updates can be posted instantly, giving the customers easy access to knowing and discovering its developments. I thought this article was very interesting and I know that it makes a really good point. By using Twitter and stressing good and effective teamwork can make a company become wildly popular instantly. This article shows how the popularity and extreme use of social media can be quite positive in one's everyday life, whether it concerns a business, company, or simply actively using social media for pleausure and enjoyment. 

 

Holmes, Ryan. "How Social Media Turns Your Employees Into a PR Army." blog.hootsuite.com. HootSuite. 3 Jan 2013. Web. 3 Jan 2013. 

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The End: Cisco Shuts Down Flip, a $590 Million Mistake

The End: Cisco Shuts Down Flip, a $590 Million Mistake | Management Project | Scoop.it
Cisco is giving up on its barely two-year-old $590 million purchase of Pure Digital Technologies, announcing today that it is closing its Flip business unit and cutting 550 employees as part of a larger restructuring aimed at refocusing the company...
Michael Pash's insight:

Many managers can make great success stories out of their life, but others can make one mistake and ultimately destroy their company. This is exactly what happened to Cisco. About one year ago, Cisco came up with the idea to buy Flip, the portable video camera company.The company purchased Flip for a whopping $590 million dollars, and it was barely a company lasting for two years. While it seemed like a great idea at first, many had not considered future technology taking over. Now, the idea of a video camera that can fit in your pocket might seem strange, as most smartphones contain video cameras. This is actually what caused the purchasing of Flip to go wrong. Since smartphones began to take over, companies like Flip lost popularity, which is why Cisco essentially made a terrible mistake to waste away nearly $600 million dollars for nothing. I enjoyed reading this article. I thought that it taught a valuable lesson for managers and every day people as well. That lesson is to think about the future before jumping into something, and to always be practical. 

 

Kim, Ryan. "The End: Cisco Shuts Down Flip, a $590 Million Mistake." gigaom.com. Gigaom. 12 April 2011. Web. 20 December 2012.

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