Management
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Management Intuition For The Next 50 Years

Management Intuition For The Next 50 Years | Management | Scoop.it

Intuition forms over time. When McKinsey began publishing the Quarterly, in 1964, a new management environment was just beginning to take shape. On April 7 of that year, IBM announced the System/360 mainframe, a product with breakthrough flexibility and capability. Then on October 10, the opening ceremonies of the Tokyo Olympic Games, the first in history to be telecast via satellite around the planet, underscored Japan’s growing economic strength. Finally, on December 31, the last new member of the baby-boom generation was born.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 8, 2014 6:35 PM

What’s the future of strategy setting, decision making, and management? We examine how the collision of rapid emerging-markets growth, technological disruption, and widespread aging is upending long-held assumptions.

Peter van Cuylenburg's curator insight, September 9, 2014 8:33 PM

Here is an article with massive implications for future workplaces and the people who will be employed there.  In our schools today we will have to consider the implications for our students. The education we provide would depend on flexible technological formats, developing inter-personal skills, enriching creativity, building clarity into ethical frameworks and so on.  Lots to think about.

Rescooped by Jean-Guy Frenette from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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With Flextime, Bosses Prefer Early Birds to Night Owls

With Flextime, Bosses Prefer Early Birds to Night Owls | Management | Scoop.it

Flextime programs have never been more popular than they are today. Google allows many employees to set their own hours. At Microsoft, many employees can choose when to start their day, as long as it’s between 9am and 11am. At the “Big Four” auditing firm KPMG, some 70 percent of employees work flexible hours.

 

Employees love these programs because they help them avoid compromises between home and at work. Yes, there are often boundaries within which a work day must begin and end, and at least some chunk of core hours that remain common across employees. But within those constraints, workers can schedule their office hours around the various other demands on their time, giving them greater control over their lives and allowing them to accomplish more. And because employees love the programs, companies have learned to love them, too. 

 


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Jean-Guy Frenette's insight:

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 15, 2014 7:33 PM

Even though they work the same number of hours. Research shows that in general, flexible work practices lead to increased productivity, higher job satisfaction, and decreased turnover intentions.

Lee Werrell's curator insight, May 16, 2014 5:22 AM

Flexitime is a great opportunity for people to fit work and play into their day, but many don't look at it from their bosses point of view - now they can see what bosses think.

Rescooped by Jean-Guy Frenette from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Evolution Of The Employee

The Evolution Of The Employee | Management | Scoop.it

This concept and the visual was taken from my new book which came out today called, The Future of Work: Attract New Talent, Build Better Leaders, and Create a Competitive Organization.

 

One of the things I have been writing about and have tried to make clear over the past few months is that work as we know it is dead and that the only way forward is to challenge convention around how we work, how we lead, and how we build our companies. Employees which were once thought of expendable cogs are the most valuable asset that any organization has. However, the employee from a decade ago isn’t the same as the employee who we are starting to see today. To help show that I wanted to share an image from my upcoming book which depicts how employees are evolving. It’s an easy way to see the past vs the future.

 


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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, September 18, 2014 3:35 AM

Wow, like it...:-)))

Hélène Introvigne's curator insight, September 18, 2014 2:39 PM

the future of work !

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:55 PM

The key question for me is how well has the leadership, company policies and management styles changed to help engage with this new breed of employee?