School- Anna Zibro
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Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired?

Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired? | School- Anna Zibro | Scoop.it
Teen sleep cycles may not match family and school schedules. Help them synchronize.
anna zibro's insight:

http://healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/teen-sleep-why-is-your-teen-so-tired-1

 

A = Amount of sleep needed

C = Causes of tiredness

S = Suggestions for improving sleep

 C-teens are known for staying up late and hard to be awaken in the morning

C- internal clock: before adolescence the circadian rhythyms direct most kids to fall asleep around 8 or 9, but puberty delays the time they get sleepy to about 11 p.m or even later

C: staying up late to study or socialise can mess with a teens internal clock even more

A: most teens need about 9 hours of sleep a night if not more to have day time alertness

A: few teens actually get that

C: part time jobs, early morning classes, homework, extracurricular activices, social demands, and use of electronics keep kids up 

A: more than 90% of teens sleep less then the recomended nine hours a night, 10% of teens sleep less than 6 hours a night

C: might seem like no big deal, it is harded for tired teens to concentrate and learn, or even stay awake in class

C: also can affect mood swings and behavioral problems, another concern is drowsy drivng, which can lead to serious or even deadly accidents

S: dim the lights as your bed time gets closer, in the morning expose teen to bright light, can help signal when it is time to sleep and wake up

S: have the same sleep schedule and try and stick to it even on weekends, plan your schedule around your sleep time

S: take a 30 minute nap after school, but not to much because to much sleep during the day will make it harded to fall asleep that night

S: stay away from caffeine, too much caffeine cause mess with a good nights sleep

S: wind down at night, with a warm shower,book or relaxing activity, stay away from excercise, loud music, video games, tv, texting or computer use and hour or two before bed time

S; keep the tv off at night, same with a computer, cellphone, and other electronicsS: sleeping pills are not recommended, life styly changes can improve sleep effectively

C: medication side affects? allergy, prescription, depression, ADHD, over the counter cold medicine can all disrupt sleep

C: sleeping to much is a sign of depression

C: if they have trouble falling asleep it is likely that they struggle with a day time sleepiness 

C:restless leg syndrome, irrestible ure to move the legs shortly after going to bed, discomfort can interupt sleep    

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My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com

My Nose Made Me Buy It: How Retailers Use Smell (and Other Tricks) to Get You to Spend, Spend, Spend | TIME.com | School- Anna Zibro | Scoop.it
Think you're using your head to make purchases? Think again.
anna zibro's insight:

http://healthland.time.com/2013/12/16/my-nose-made-me-buy-it-how-retailers-use-smell-and-other-tricks-to-get-you-to-spend-spend-spend/

 

 

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Concussions: What you should know

anna zibro's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=19&edition=&ts=0213A98DA46D0F1F52FD812A078DCFC7_1389569728828&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B212221048

 

D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussion

 

G: No standard timeline for when to go back, depends on the person and how bad their concussion is

G: physical activity should begin slowly

G: first walking then jogging, and if not signs progress from there into to more active sports

G:after rest doctors say activity is good for the brain

G: but some concussions are danerous and require a long recovery

G: schools have students take a test such as IMPACT for a baseline

G: some times it is even suggested that kids drop corses that will be easiest to pick up after the break

D: worse as a child because children are still developing, in adult brains cells are adding insolation called myelination which strengthens the brain connections

D: more vulnerbal to damage before is it fully myelination

D: kids necks are not as strong and their heads are big compared to their bodys, so it causes more movement among impact, which reslts in injury to the brain

D: can lead to 4 major categories of symptons

Cognitive symptoms,trouble with attention, memory, or learning, sleep problems either to much or not enough, head pain, emotional symptoms, those who already have migranes, depression ADHD take longer to recover

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Tips for sleepy teens

anna zibro's insight:

http://elibrary.bigchalk.com/elibweb/elib/do/document?set=search&dictionaryClick=&secondaryNav=advance&groupid=1&requestid=lib_standard&resultid=20&edition=&ts=825FB7B94EDE9B40455D39EB04F770C1_1389818036653&start=1&publicationId=&urn=urn%3Abigchalk%3AUS%3BBCLib%3Bdocument%3B196023309

 

 

A = Amount of sleep needed

C = Causes of tiredness

S = Suggestions for improving sleep

 A: 9 hours, many teens are in their deepest stage of sleep just an their parents start trying to wake them up

C: chronically sleep deprived, some sleep right through the loudest alarm, it is like they are dead

S: learn to wake up on their own sooner or later, only walk in once every morning

S: keep track of their sleep patterns for a couple of weeks, & make changes according to that, as going to bed earlier or finishing homework sooner

S: weekends push their body clocks off school- week schedules teens need to get up no more than an hour or two later than on weekdays, anything out of 10 am is out of bounds for weekends

S: if all fails give say you wont give them a ride or write an excuse if they wake up late

S: light in the morning helps you wake up, and light at night keeps you awake,  

 

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High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions

High school athletes found more vulnerable to concussions | School- Anna Zibro | Scoop.it
High school athletes are more at risk of concussions than their collegiate counterparts, a study finds.
anna zibro's insight:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/31/health/athletes-concussions/index.html?iref=allsearch

 

D = dangers of concussions

G = guidelines for students to return to activities

S = suggestions for solving the problem of concussion

 

 

D-risk for concussions, could be worst enemies

D-"culture of resistance" to reporting concussions and other treatment plans could be doing more to harm athletes

D- high school athletes were more likely to get concussed than college age players

D- high school football players were almost 2 times as likely to have concussions as their collegiate counterparts

D- might lead to fewer boys playing football

S- not sure if older kids just report concussions more or unsure of knowing if there's an actual increase of concussion in younger players

S- division one students are probably feel more committed and have more fears and think reporting symptons will effect playing time

FUN FACT: woments ice hockey had the highest rate of concussions

D: helemt and equipment did little to temper the risk

D: after getting one concussion someone is more likely to get another one,

D: even thought 49 states have concussion laws in the books that still is not enough to deal with them

S: made 6 recomendations during the report

• stronger data collection;

• better metrics and diagnosis for concussions in young people;

• more studies assessing the long-term effects of repetitive head trauma;

• possible rule changes to make sports safer;

• more research looking at how the number and time between concussions affects the brain;

• increased efforts to change the culture and encourage reporting of symptoms and concussions



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