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Tight Lips Over Who Started Fires in Sumatra

Tight Lips Over Who Started Fires in Sumatra | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Environmental and wildlife investigators said plantation companies, small farmers and people who illegally encroach on concessions to harvest trees and palm oil are all culpable for the blazes.

Via SustainOurEarth
David Collet's insight:

Money. Always money. Children with asthma, seniors with bronchial conditions, they don't matter. But, when God decides to tally up the balance, it will be too late for these murderers.

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Malaysian Youth Scene
All things related to interests, issues, fads of youth in Malaysia
Curated by David Collet
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How To Make $500,000 A Year On Twitter

How To Make $500,000 A Year On Twitter | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
David Collet's insight:

This is interesting because of the soooo many scams that promise you that you can earn money sitting at home. In parenthesis (hidden) it is implied that you dont have to work hard to do it.

 

This is one that is not a scam but it also highlights that it was all hard work.

 

It is a millennial project that earns money because millennials+ are watching.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, October 20, 12:52 PM


Nicole Laporte:  "UberFacts founder Kris Sanchez has turned his addictive Twitter feed into a wildly lucrative business. But not everyone's buying it."

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Five Lessons for Canada from Germany's Clean Energy Revolution | The Tyee

Five Lessons for Canada from Germany's Clean Energy Revolution | The Tyee | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
The biggest? That renewables make the economy stronger, says German energy expert David Jacobs.
David Collet's insight:

Another from the same source as above.

 

Instead of focusing on the evils of the world, let's look at the successes. And by most accounts (if you believe the mainstream press) a very unexpected success.

 

Who would think that you could bankrupt the most powerful companies in the world and still have a viable, yea even improved society.

 

I will grant that this piece is about someone who has much economic stake in making people believe the viability of clean energy. But sufficient facts and suggestions are presented to make a compelling case. 

 

And the mainstream press will not cover this.

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Car batteries may soon last 1,000 years thanks to pine and alfalfa

Car batteries may soon last 1,000 years thanks to pine and alfalfa | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
A group of Swedish researchers pulled a serious MacGyver earlier this month, combining pine resin and alfalfa seeds to create a hybrid recycled battery.
David Collet's insight:

OK. So I seem to be on electricity today. 

 

But.. something has been bothering me for quite a while now. Before coming to Malaysia, I drove petroleum powered cars which all had batteries. Essential equipment. I remember occasionally having to change batteries - perhaps once in the life time of a car - 4 years or more. And this was in a cold climate.

 

Even my Proton Saga (1991 flavour) required infrequent battery changes. Battery technology has been improving in every other area but in Malaysia, this is going backwards. Every seems to expect to have to replace a battery every year. Most of these are the 'no maintenance' type batteries - a lucrative con if ever I have seen one. But I don't buy these. I don't mind checking the battery water every couple of fill-ups to ensure it is ok. And I understand the hot climate will result in faster water evaporation even if the caps are tightly closed. But even with regular service, I find that the battery will not last beyond 24 months. Something is wrong here. 

 

So, this article offers a glimmer of relief. Probably not much because I will still have to cycle the battery out for a replacement but at least I will be happy in the knowledge that the old one will be used wisely.

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Why are utilities trying to disconnect communities of color from solar?

Why are utilities trying to disconnect communities of color from solar? | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Big Energy sees net metering as a threat to its bottom line, but it could be a boon for underserved communities, and electric utilities, too.
David Collet's insight:

Another article on electricity. In Malaysia, we are still building expensive electric generation plants and even worse, building dams. Neither are needed but the big money is with these modes of generation. Cut out the new plants and you reduce the money to the wealthy developers. That's why this is in the politics section. Renewable energy is and should be a question of science. But the science side has already been settled. Now it is a question of politics. The will to do the right thing. Stop building polluters (plants) and environment disasters (electric dams) and start using the sun and the wind and the tides.

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CHART OF THE DAY: New Consumer Tech May Drive A Monster Holiday Season

CHART OF THE DAY: New Consumer Tech May Drive A Monster Holiday Season | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
It's the most wonderful time of the year — for consumers and tech companies alike.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
David Collet's insight:

In an environment in which doom and gloom seems to dominate, this is a piece of good news.

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Firechat Enables the Crowd to Become the Internet –Bypassing Central Powers | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

Firechat Enables the Crowd to Become the Internet –Bypassing Central Powers | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
David Collet's insight:

This one is a bit fun. Try it out. You never know when you are going to need something like this and it costs nothing to look at it.

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Living Lightly Fair to focus on educating youth - Muncie Star Press

Living Lightly Fair to focus on educating youth - Muncie Star Press | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Living Lightly Fair to focus on educating youth
Muncie Star Press
MUNCIE – With a focus on celebrating educators for sustainability and engaging youth, this year's free Living Lightly Fair is Saturday at Minnetrista.
David Collet's insight:

Serious but fun from the bread basket of U.S.A.

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Scenes from the New American Dustbowl

Scenes from the New American Dustbowl | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it

Political conspiracies, water witches, Exodus-quoting priests, and angry, defeated farmers in California’s dying, drought …


Via SustainOurEarth
David Collet's insight:

I have said this before. Malaysians need to be thankfull for all of the blessings. In Malaysia if it doesn't rain every second day we have a drought. In California it hasn't rained seriously for three years. Many in Malaysia eat the food from this region. Think about. Take action before it is too late.

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Dunkin' Donuts cleans up its palm-oil act (and Krispy Kreme follows suit)

Dunkin' Donuts cleans up its palm-oil act (and Krispy Kreme follows suit) | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
The doughnut giant announces it will use only rainforest-friendly fat to fry up its sweet rings of temptation. Pressure's now on the competition.
David Collet's insight:

Palm Oil is a really important export in Malaysia. It is important to understand the views of our customers on how eco-friendly we are.

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Jobless youth in China: Crisis in the making - CNBC

Jobless youth in China: Crisis in the making - CNBC | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
CNBC Jobless youth in China: Crisis in the making CNBC Youth unemployment – referring to those who are between 16 and 24 years old - currently stands at 13 percent (or some 73 million young persons), according to the International Labor...
David Collet's insight:

I think the interesting thing here is that China continues to grow and did not suffer the same problem in 2008 as western economies with the 'sub-prime meltdown' induced recession.

 

In spite of this, youth unemployment continues to be high. And the highest rate is among the best educated.

 

This article focus' on the lowest educated segment and identifies threats to employment in this segment. 

 

In my opinion the solution lies not in the traditional methods used over the past 75 years (since the great depression in the U.S.) but in a radical remix of employment options. The ownership mix must change from the elite few controlling the financing and reaping all of the benefits to a more balanced mix of individual entrepreneurship working with a considerably weakened global conglomerate. This could happen peacefully but I am not confident that the current owners will succumb peacefully.

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 17, 12:17 PM

The fascinating aspect of this to me is the inverse relationship of education to employment.  I think we see some of this here in the US where over college graduate millennials are having trouble finding career type positions. -Lon 

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Fast Food Franchise Owners Ask Congress For Help To Stop Worker Campaign For Wages, Union

Fast Food Franchise Owners Ask Congress For Help To Stop Worker Campaign For Wages, Union | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
The trade group for franchise owners is lobbying Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) to help in their fight to preserve a business model that squeezes workers.
David Collet's insight:

First, I will report that I am among those who do not eat at McDonalds. I have only ever eaten there because a business colleague wished to lunch there, or my grandchildren insist on the toy. I do not consider McDonalds to be a place that serves food. And that requires that you have a definition of food which I do.

 

I am also among those who boycott McDonalds because as a corporation they support financially the illegal occupation of Palestinian land and the unprovoked agression against the residents of Gaza.

 

Finally, for those who claim that the Franchise in Malaysia is wholly owned by a Malaysian and provides jobs to needy Malaysians I scoop this as a proof that that is not accurate. As this article points, the agreement between the Franchisees and McDonalds overwhelmingly favours McDonalds and limits the options of the local owners. And the employees are treated more like indentured (slaves) than normal employees. If action is successful in the U.S. against this practice, there is a chance there will be spill over effect in Malaysia. This would be good for both the employees and the local owners. 

 

And as a side note, this is not only McDonalds at stake. KFC and others are also included in this group. 

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#China, the #Climate and the Fate of the Planet #coal #pollution #Australia

#China, the #Climate and the Fate of the Planet #coal #pollution #Australia | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Inside the slow, frustrating - and maybe even hopeful - struggle to reduce China's climate-changing pollution.

Via CineversityTV
David Collet's insight:

Caution! Be prepared for a long read. But this topic is so crucial to the future of Malaysia it should be mandatory reading for aspiring Malaysian manager.

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These old barns are good for more than reclaimed wood and weddings

These old barns are good for more than reclaimed wood and weddings | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Around the country, classic, crumbling farm buildings are being spruced up and put back to work by a new generation of sustainable farmers.
David Collet's insight:

Now.. this may seem a bit far fetched for a topic on Youth in Malaysia but ... think about it a bit.

 

In my own family circle I have members who are either unemployed or under employed. And yet, there is a shortage of entrepreneurs who want to try something new.

 

My grandson has ambitions to become a world renown chef with a Malaysian flavour - ala Chef Wan but better. But he needs to look at sourcing products that are not normal to Malaysia.

 

I know of idle property in Negri Sembilan that is just begging for someone to re-invent a purpose for it. And my opinion is that this is not an isolated incident.

 

The future is going to be quite different than the recent past. This is a good case of 'thinking outside of the box' and imagining what might be, rather than settling for what is.

And, if nothing else, it is a fun read.

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'Serial' Podcast: True Crime Storytelling at Its Finest | The Tyee

'Serial' Podcast: True Crime Storytelling at Its Finest | The Tyee | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
To call it addictive is an understatement. But should I be this entertained?
David Collet's insight:

I was at one of my favourite sites getting two other scoops when I saw this and it intrigued me.

 

I view this as part of a new genre of occupation. This is somewhat creative, and fictional, and somewhat reality theatre (which I really do not like).

 

It matches of the demographics of the emerging generation of consumers in that it is web based, it is on-demand, it is thought provoking, and most of all, it seems, it is entertaining without being too fake.

 

I wonder how it can be monetized? But it is certainly a candidate for a new occupation title.

 

I guess what used to be termed Author - Mystery could be used but this seems to be more and can be stretched to include reader participation. That makes it like the droll 'Crime Busters' that has been on television for some time and has produced results. But that is not quite enough because this is more than that and is in a format that permits ad hoc participation. You don't need to be tied to the tube at any particular time.

 

And if it results in restorative justice... all the better.

 

 

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Harper's Foreign Policy Confirms Orwell's Insights | The Tyee

Harper's Foreign Policy Confirms Orwell's Insights | The Tyee | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
To sell a pointless war, foster 'protective stupidity' among citizens.
David Collet's insight:

This is an article about Canada but I think it could be applied to every country except perhaps the U.S.A. It reflects my opinion on the current excitement being generated about the so-called Islamic State. The newest form of Muslim Terrorist. 

 

Now, don't get me wrong. I don't support the stated goals of IS. Nor do I support or encourage the type of horror show propagated on their behalf. 

 

But, after decades (now more than three) of misinformation concerning anything that goes contrary to the security state (within a state) of the U.S.A, I am sceptical of anything that everyone gets so excited about without any real information coming from the dissenting view.

 

Turkey is allowing IS to kill off their internal headache known as the Kurdish Freedom Fighters. Iraq is putting off any kind of real inclusive government in the hopes that international indignation will kill off their opponents.Syria is hoping against hope to keep their minority dictator in power. And throughout all of the middle east governments are secretly hoping all the foul dirt will land on Iran. Finally Israel is sitting back smiling while everyone conveniently forgets about their atrocities committed in the name of personal security but was really a poorly veiled attempt to grab more territory.

 

Smoke and mirrors. All smoke and mirrors.

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La gratuité contre l’effondrement climatique

La gratuité contre l’effondrement climatique | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Et si la gratuité était le premier pas pour une transition écologique et une société de justice sociale ? Face à un système productiviste qui est « (...)

Via Aquitaine decroissance, SustainOurEarth
David Collet's insight:

This is in French and unless you use Chrome it probably is off limits for you. But the idea is an interesting one.

 

To simply the article... consider transportation in Kuala Lumpur (or any town or city in Malaysia). If you want to make it efficient, you need to increase the number of people who use. If you want to increase the number of people who use you need to make it efficient, clean, reliable, and most of all, pervasive. By this I mean, it must reach all of the potential riders and offer all of the benefits. This costs money. But... there are cities to do this and the benefits to the cities are incredible. The notion that there must be a profit from transportation is what is holding everything back. Cities that do this, pay for the transportation through taxes - multi-level taxes. People who insist on driving their cars pay more for petrol and the extra cost is directed to the payment of public transit. Free public transit. The thinking behind this is that the more people who use buses and LRT's, the fewer cars there are on the roads. The fewer cars on the road, the easier it is for the stubborn ones to get to where they are going. So, let them pay money for the convenience of getting there more easily.

 

An efficient transportation (and by this I mean a publicly owned) system, requires more employees to operate. This seems like it will result in greater costs but the experience seems to point to the opposite. The more people working on the transportation system, the more people will need to use the system. Most vehicles will be used optimally most of the time. There will be fewer 'empty' vehicles wandering around and therefore less resources wasted.

 

You get the idea. There are things that should be free - water, transportation, medical care - to all. It is more efficient and can be better managed. 

 

Growing up, all of our water was free (sort of). We paid a levy each year based on the number of water outlets in the house. Each bathroom, kitchen, etc. There were very few people with swimming pools but these came with a very high levy for water rights. But the levy was not on how much water you used. It was on how many ways you could use the water.

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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, October 17, 2:02 PM

La gratuité est certainement une belle idée, mais il faut se méfier de ces belles idées. Une comparaison est faite en particulier entre le stationnement et l'eau. Pourquoi ne pas payer le premier et payer la seconde qui est vitale ? Ca semble imparable à première vue, c'est pourtant loin d'être aussi simpliste.


Le stationnement n'est déjà pas gratuit partout loin s'en faut, dès qu'il y a rareté de l'espace, le stationnement est payant et peut être cher. On loue un espace, si cet espace génère en plus des coûts de gestion, propose des services, son coût augmente, ce qui est le cas des parkings souterrains. On peut les rendre gratuits, l'objectif est alors d'éviter de saturer les espaces centraux, la gratuité, fictive puisqu'il y a des coûts à couvrir, est en fait payée par les résidents qui en contrepartie peuvent bénéficier d'espaces publics moins encombrés.


Un éléments essentiel est celui de la récupération des coûts. En dehors des parkings souterrains, le stationnement ne génère en général pas de coûts en lui même. Il fonctionne avec la chaussée pour sa mise en place et pour son entretien. En revanche, le service de l'eau génère des coûts importants : les infrastructures sont coûteuses, l'entretien aussi. Il s'agit de charges fixes à 80 % environ, indépendantes de la consommation. Quoiqu'il arrive, il faut les couvrir, la gratuité ne cache pas les même réalités.


On peut bien sûr transférer cette couverture pour l'eau de la facture vers l'impôt, faire payer non l'usager, mais le contribuable. Le problème de l'impôt est qu'il ne garantit pas que ses recettes seront effectivement affectées à ce service. On constate dans bien des ca que le fonctionnement est souvent sacrifié, surtout en période de disette budgétaire. On court le risque du sous investissement, là où la facture, si elle couvre bien les coûts, offre une garantie plus grande de recettes, surtout si comme pour l'eau il y a un budget spécifique autonome. Sur l'équité de la mesure, on peut aussi se poser des questions. Doit on faire reposer sur les résidents, la consommation des non permanents. Par exemple, dans une station balnéaire, les résidents à l'année paieraient par leurs impôts locaux les consommations des vacanciers. Sur le plan environnemental, l'absence de prix, comme pour le parking, renvoie à une non rareté et est souvent générateur de surconsommations, de pressions renforcées sur la ressource. Alors que l'on va vers des coûts de production qui augmentent, est-ce aller dans le bon sens ?


Il est bien sûr possible de rendre l'eau gratuite, mais comme on ne supprimera pas son coût, cette mesure est loin d'être une solution qui éviterait l'effondrement climatique, elle est en tout cas de façon à peu près certaine une solution qui accélérerait la dégradation de nos services, sans introduire une plus grande justice sociale.

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How one building is changing the world

How one building is changing the world | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Seattle's Bullitt Center is making waves far beyond its super-insulated, nontoxic, and FSC-certified walls.
David Collet's insight:

You know.. I like feel good stories. Especially with all the dirty political infighting going on these days all over the world. This is a win-win story. A philanthropic (charity) group decided to 'put their money where their mouth was' and built a self-sustaining building. Not external electricity, no external water (maybe some bottled water - doesn't) say. Food, of course must be brought in. The roof is a electric generating station thanks to solar panels. The basement recycles all water in the building - toilets, sinks, everything to make it re-usable. Ugh. But, the astronauts do it so... To compliment/supplement this it has a 'rain-collection, purification' system. Seattle gets a lot of rain. Something like Vancouver. For those who don't know, a bit farther north, and in Canadian territory, there is a rain forest on Vancouver Island - not to be confused with the City on the main land.

 

It is in Seattle - for those that don't know that is quite a ways north and in the winter it doesn't get that much sunlight and it gets quite cool. Not cold like Winnipeg, Canada, or Helsinki. But down to freezing (0 C). So, heating with any external energy source could be a challenge. On the opposite side of the coin, air-conditioning is less of a concern but still required in the hot days of summer (last count was 3 days a year (joke)).

 

But... imaging how this could work in Malaysia. Lots of sunshine. Lots of rain (most of the time - but perhaps not as sustained as Seattle). I myself have thought of a project to dig a rain catchment tank on our condominium property to be used to water the many gardens on the property.

 

But... this whole idea renewable energy is just ready to take off.

 

We should get on board.

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Smithsonian Releases Statement on Climate Change: "Climate Change will affect Everything."

Smithsonian Releases Statement on Climate Change: "Climate Change will affect Everything." | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
30 years late to the party but significant in that this magazine is on a lot of conservative coffee tables. Smithsonian Magazine: As humans continue to transform the planet at an increasingly rapid...

Via SustainOurEarth
David Collet's insight:

Embarrassingly late to the party. But better late than never. A 'respected' organisation finally admits that we are doing something wrong.

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What's the Future of Storytelling? 'Unknown Spring' Provides Some Answers

What's the Future of Storytelling? 'Unknown Spring' Provides Some Answers | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
David Collet's insight:

I like this piece because it pulls together a number of areas that interest me.

 

First, this is someone doing something without a big budget and receiving international acclaim. That someone is young. It is relevant to the environment. And it includes my thoughts on new opportunities for youth for employment alternatives.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, September 28, 2:02 PM


Paula Bernstein:  "In March 2011 Jake Price, a freelance producer for the BBC, journeyed to Tohoku, Japan to document the devastation left in the wake of the Pacific tsunami. The result of his trip is evident in his powerful and beautiful immersive web documentary, "Unknown Spring," which was awarded the World Press Photo Multimedia Awards."

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ISIS Entices Youth With High Salaries - King Of Jordan - Forbes

ISIS Entices Youth With High Salaries - King Of Jordan - Forbes | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Forbes ISIS Entices Youth With High Salaries - King Of Jordan Forbes Abdullah explained that the extremist group ISIS is gaining momentum because of its ability to recruit followers, offering attractive salaries to young people looking to provide...
David Collet's insight:

This is timely. Youth need to know they are a part of a global solution that will provide opportunities to contribute to solutions with both authority to act independently without fear of reprisal and to obtain financial compensation to permit them to full fill their personal goals. Quite the opposite of the global employment opportunities today.

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The fragile happiness of Japan's 'insular' youth - East Asia Forum

The fragile happiness of Japan's 'insular' youth - East Asia Forum | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
The fragile happiness of Japan's 'insular' youth
East Asia Forum
The youth of Japan appear to face a bleak future — a catastrophic budget deficit, ageing population and collapsing social security system.
David Collet's insight:

I want to scoop this more because of what doesn't say than what it says. I see Japan as a place where the average worker endured difficult conditions not because he/she was climbing up the social structure. It was more a combination of culture (the boss was the boss) and security. A job was for life. No lay offs. He/She continued working even if it was boring and only very marginally rewarding. Very much like a feudal system. But then came the crash. This all changed. 

 

Now the youth see their parents as an example of what is wrong with this system. In most cases efficiency improvements happen in small mostly invisible steps. All of the celebrated efficiency of the Japanese work force is accurate and is the result of a dedicated team. The whole team is rewarded commensurate with their level in the team. Often it is at the very lowest level in the team that the greatest contributions to the team efficiency are made. But with the crash it is these very contributors to the core prosperity both of the company and the country who lose their security.

 

The executives who made the strategic decisions about investments and product mix continue to enjoy employment. But it was a failure to navigate a changing global economy - the result of these strategic decisions - that led to the crash. The youth now are well educated. They are hooked in to information sources that their parents never had. They realize the inequity of the fall out. And, while they may be worried about the future they realize that their voices will not be heard over the din of the elderly. Thus worrying is futile. As the song says "don't worry... be happy!" Live for today because the future is too uncertain and beyond your ability to affect.

 

Malaysians should take note. This not uniquely a Japanese problem.

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"I" Is For Innovation: Sesame Street's Secrets For Staying Relevant

"I" Is For Innovation: Sesame Street's Secrets For Staying Relevant | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
David Collet's insight:

This one I have to rescoop. I am too old to have benefited from Sesame Street but that doesn't my life was not affected by it. This is technology used at its best and most effective. The message delivered has always been universal. And it has remained true to its original format. There is no mention of the creator of the series in this piece and I think that is a mistake. Sesame Street was done by a creative genius on a par with Steve Jobs.

 

 

There are lessons in this success for young entrepreneurs if only you look.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, September 16, 7:58 PM


Elizabeth Segran:  "For generations of viewers, Sesame Street is a portal to a simpler, more innocent time in their lives. This creates something of a quandary for the show’s producers: how do you keep evolving a show so it doesn’t get stale without offending its devoted fans?"

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Preventing climate change and adapting to it are not morally equivalent

Preventing climate change and adapting to it are not morally equivalent | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
Climate change mitigation and adaptation are often discussed as though they are interchangeable. They are not.
David Collet's insight:

In this discussion, Malaysia comes somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. We are wealthy enough (sort of) to afford much of the adaptation strategy that will be required. But not for the more expensive versions so we will simply have to 'suffer'.

 

On the other hand, mitigation is only slightly within our control. Much of the problem belongs with the big two - China and the U.S.A. Unless we look at per capita contribution in which case Canada also comes into the picture.

 

But the big thing here is that mitigation is actually a religious obligation - that is what is meant by 'morally' here. People who are broadly concerned for all creation, including all flora and fauna (animals, fish, plants) generally are this way because of a religious conviction. In the case of Buddhists this is not considered a religion as such but as a moral imperative. I personally don't see much of a distinction. These same people tend to be concerned in this way even to the temporary detriment of their living condition (financial, etc).

 

Adaptation on the other hand is pretty much a survival issue - protect me, my family, my group, my country and then maybe others.

 

But, be sure to read to the end of the article because there is a light at the end of the read. There is actually a financial incentive to 'doing the right thing'. And it is enough to actually cause the normally selfish human to act. Being a religious person I will pray that our Creator will inspire all people to act in their best interests and therefore behave in a manner that will help all of creation.

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#Drought Bites as #Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up #climate

#Drought Bites as #Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up #climate | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
By Jan Rocha, Climate News Network Scientists in Brazil believe the loss of billions of liters of water released as vapor clouds by Amazon rainforest trees is the result of continuing deforestation and climate change—leading to...

Via CineversityTV
David Collet's insight:

On a smaller scale but just as important view the Reserve behind Ampang. It is huge stretching from KL to Ipoh and far to the east. But with development it is shrinking rapidly. And as it shrinks KL gets hotter and drier. Think Selangor water rationing. Trees are really important to maintain a rain forest. That should be so obvious but greedy people seem to forget this.

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Back to the Slums of His Youth, to Defuse the Ebola Time Bomb - New York Times

Back to the Slums of His Youth, to Defuse the Ebola Time Bomb - New York Times | Malaysian Youth Scene | Scoop.it
New York Times
Back to the Slums of His Youth, to Defuse the Ebola Time Bomb
New York Times
MONROVIA, Liberia — The girl in the pink shirt lay motionless on a sidewalk, flat on her stomach, an orange drink next to her, unfinished.
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