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As-it-happens.pdf

Do you want to know how to create a journalistic live blog?

Christina Veiga's insight:

Do you want to know how to create a journalistic live blog?

 

Here is a really interesting report about "live blogging" for journalists: How live news blogs work and their future . It is from Polis, the think tank devoted to the study of journalism in the London School of Economics.

  The live blog is a relatively new, web-native format that has special possibilities for creating journalism. It is an example of networked journalism that puts an emphasis on aggregated material from different sources such as social media and user- generated content.Live blogs are usually heavily dependent on other mainstream media as well as social media to function.News consumers appreciate the format of the live blog. They sometimes prefer it over other formats such as a conventional news articles and sometimes consume types of content they would not normally have chosen because it is presented in a live blog.The use of live blogs has sparked conflict and debate, mainly because of the speed at which they are written and how this leads to publishing unconfirmed information which has occasionally put people at risk of harm.Live blogs change the way journalists work: they have more (or less) to do, they use a different tone of voice and they might not always be able to verify the information that they share. Reporters take on a new role, that sometimes might resemble that of an editor, curator or moderator.Verifying facts in real time is one of the biggest journalistic challenges when working with live blogs. Other challenges include the live blog taking up a lot of resources and keeping the narrative structure clear.Live blogs can be used as a way of engaging with readers, making it easier for the newspaper to receive useful user generated content.Live blogs might change how media companies act towards news consumers and increase the level of engagement with readers.Live blogs open up the journalistic process to readers, so transferring some of the journalistic responsibility towards them. Live blogs change the way the reader consumes the news – the reader has to act like an editor.The live blog is an evolving format that we will see more of in the future. 
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Who’s behind that tweet? Here’s how 7 news orgs manage their Twitter and Facebook accounts

Who’s behind that tweet? Here’s how 7 news orgs manage their Twitter and Facebook accounts | making some noise | Scoop.it

Human, bot, or something in between? We asked ABC News, the AP, CNN, NBC News, The New York Times, USA Today, and The Wall Street Journal how they power their Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Christina Veiga's insight:

How are the major news organizations managing social networks?

 

An interesting article from the Nieman Journalism Lab: Who’s behind that tweet? Here’s how 7 news orgs manage their Twitter and Facebook accounts

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10 tips for editing video in a thoughtful, compelling way | TED Blog

10 tips for editing video in a thoughtful, compelling way | TED Blog | making some noise | Scoop.it

The techniques editors use to shape film and video content reveal a lot about how people create meaning in the world. Some guidelines.


Via Andy Bull
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The magazine ‘Diez Minutos’ publishes an imaginary interview with Letizia Ortiz

The magazine ‘Diez Minutos’ publishes an imaginary interview with Letizia Ortiz | making some noise | Scoop.it
El último número de ‘Diez Minutos’ lleva como principal reclamo un contenido insólito. Se trata de una “entrevista imaginaria” con Doña Letizia.
Christina Veiga's insight:

Her is a new genre of journalism: the imaginary interview. 

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The best and worst things about journalists - OUPblog

The best and worst things about journalists - OUPblog | making some noise | Scoop.it
By Tony Harcup Journalists are heroes to some and scumbags to others but the truth is that most are somewhere in the middle, trying to do as good a job as they can, often in difficult circumstances. That, at least, is the view of Tony Harcup, author of A Dictionary of Journalism. We asked him to tell us about some of the good – and not so good – things that journalists do.
Christina Veiga's insight:

The nine best things about journalists

1. We tell you things that you didn’t even know you didn’t know.
2. Our default position is healthy scepticism.
3. We know that there’s no such thing as a stupid question.
4. Our way with words translates jargon into language that actual people use.
5. We juggle complex intellectual, legal, commercial and ethical issues every day, simultaneously and at high speed, all while giving the impression of being little deeper than a puddle.
6. Our lateral thinking spots the significance of the dog that didn’t bark (noting in the process that Sherlock Holmes was created by a journalist).
7. We speak truth to power (or, at least, we say boo to a goose).
8. Our gallows humour keeps us going despite the grim stories we cover and the even grimmer people we work with (perhaps the most literal exponent of the art was journalist Ben Hecht who wrote the movies His Girl Friday and The Front Page about hacks covering a hanging).
9. We identify with other journalists as fellow members of society’s awkward squad (which is why even those of us who have left the frontline of reporting and become “hackademics” still can’t stop saying “we”).

The nine worst things about journalists

1. We have a tendency to tell young hopefuls that all the quality has vanished from journalism compared to when we started out (journalists have been harking back to a mythical golden age for well over a century).
2. Our scepticism can sometimes become cynicism.
3. We routinely demand public apologies or resignations from anyone accused of misbehaviour (except ourselves).
4. Our way with words is too often used to reduce individuals or communities to stereotypes.
5. We have been known to conflate a popular touch with boorish anti-intellectualism.
6. Our collective memory lets us down surprisingly often. (We won’t get fooled again? Don’t bet on it.)
7. We are in danger of viewing the world through the eyes of whoever employs us, forgetting that, while they might hire us, they don’t own us.
8. Our insistence that we are something of a special breed is a bit rich given that most journalistic jobs have more in common with The Office than with All The President’s Men.
9. We eviscerate politicians for fiddling their expenses while celebrating hacks from the golden age (see no. 1) for doing exactly the same.

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Journalism and the Arrogance of Power

Journalism and the Arrogance of Power | making some noise | Scoop.it

That made reporters powerful people; advertisers needed newspapers to promote their stuff and sources needed reporters to get their message out to a wide audience. Decades of privilege bred a certain degree of arrogance. The print journalism profession has developed an elaborate, self-justifying ideology in which their own activities are central to the functioning of American democracy.

In the last decade, newspapers have lost their privileged position. Now everyone can publish for a large audience. And so lots of people are doing to the Post what the Post has always done to the rest of the world: treat them as raw material from which to fashion stories, without sharing any of the resulting revenue. The only way this could be considered an outrage is if you’ve grown used to the process only happening in the other direction.


Via Andrea Naranjo
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Trust_and_Journalism_in_a_Digital_Environment.pdf

Christina Veiga's insight:

This paper, about trusting in contemporary medias, was published in March by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism: Trust and Journalism in a Digital Environment

  "Expanding journalistic activities to social networks also has a potential to create trust in journalism. Differentiation on the role level leads to blogging and tweeting especially at larger news media. Some journalists use social media as a distribution channel for opinions and information. According to the editor-in-chief of the Daily Telegraph (London), their sports editor has more followers on Facebook than the combined circulation of the Guardian and the Times. Postings and tweets are used for sending facts and comments, but they are also in use for reflecting on the on-going work process. Specialised blogs and selected articles describe processes and difficulties of news gathering. Therefore, they are a feature to make journalists’ work more transparent. Making obstacles to journalistic work public shows the vulnerability of journalism. The disclosure of obstacles and ways of dealing with them has the potential to create trust through transparency. According to Sambrook (2012), transparency is an equivalent to objectivity in the world of journalism. This might enhance journalists’ credibility. Interactivity also has the potential to add some value to the role holder. Journalists may extend their reputation through social media by offering followers transparency and examples of their competency to be up-to-date. Such activities contain at least the possibility of building trust with recipients."
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(Re)defining multimedia journalism

(Re)defining multimedia journalism | making some noise | Scoop.it
New storytelling forms inspire us
Christina Veiga's insight:

New storytelling forms in journalism — I just read this interesting article, from Mindy McAdams, about multimedia storytelling. It's worth reading: (Re)defining multimedia journalism

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We are drowning in data about readers and attention, but which metrics really matter? You won't like the answer

We are drowning in data about readers and attention, but which metrics really matter? You won't like the answer | making some noise | Scoop.it
There are more ways than ever to measure traffic, readership, attention and engagement with our content. But all that means is there are even more things to distract us from the important questions about who we are trying to reach and how.
Christina Veiga's insight:

News sites can not only care about their page views. This article is essential.

 “Unfortunately, many advertisers and brands continue to look at what they call “reach,” and that encourages a focus not on engagement but on raw numbers like pageviews, as News Corp. executive Raju Narisetti noted in a recent piece for the Poynter Institute. And the larger those numbers are, the better advertisers like them — even if that encourages gaming strategies, such as buying traffic from clickfarms, etc. And that is often exactly what happens." 
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Tow-Center-Report — MOVING THE NEWSROOM: POST- INDUSTRIAL NEWS SPACES AND PLACES

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Her is a NEW report not to be missed, from NIKKI USHER , about 

The architecture of digital newsrooms

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Journalists’ big switch

Journalists’ big switch | making some noise | Scoop.it

This article More companies are hiring scribes to ramp up ‘content plays’

Christina Veiga's insight:

J.D.Lasica writes about the tendency  of  brands hiring journalists  for their credibility.

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Pourquoi les internautes partagent des contenus sur le web ?

Pourquoi les internautes partagent des contenus sur le web ? | making some noise | Scoop.it
L’émotion peut-elle être manipulée pour créer un désir de partage ?
Sommes-nous conditionnés à partager sur forme de flemmingite aiguë ?
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Is All of Twitter Fair Game for Journalists?

Is All of Twitter Fair Game for Journalists? | making some noise | Scoop.it
One day last week, Christine Fox came across a news article about an unidentified sixtysomething woman who had been raped by her grandson. Fox has amassed a modest following on Twitter, and she was moved to share the story with the flock.* She tweeted the link to her 13,000 followers...
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Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn't Optional, It's Mandatory - AJR.org

Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn't Optional, It's Mandatory - AJR.org | making some noise | Scoop.it
Should reporters be required to tweet?
Christina Veiga's insight:

 

This article, from Mary Clare Fischer in the American Journalism Review, is a must read: Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn’t Optional, It’s Mandatory

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Interviewing beyond words

Interviewing beyond words | making some noise | Scoop.it
MEDIA | How journalists can effectively elicit answers to their questions
Christina Veiga's insight:

Get more than just words from your interviews

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How algorithms decide the news you see

How algorithms decide the news you see | making some noise | Scoop.it
Homepage traffic for news sites continues to decrease. This trend is the result of an “if the news is important, it will find me” mentality that developed with the rise of social media, when people began to read links that their friends and others in their networks recommended. Thus, readers are increasingly discovering news through social media, email, and reading…
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Science of Us – What Studies Say About Human Behavior & Productivity

Science of Us – What Studies Say About Human Behavior & Productivity | making some noise | Scoop.it
Using research and studies in psychology, sociology, and genetics to examine our relationships, parenting styles, health, and productivity, Science of Us is an intelligent window into human behavior, providing useful information that can be applied to everyday life.
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Science of Us is a window into the latest science on human behavior. Its goal is to enlighten, entertain and provide useful information that can be applied to everyday life. The site's daily mix of columns, news stories, and visual features translates research from psychology, sociology, genetics, and other fields for a general audience.

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How Niuzly wants to put control into the hands of journalists | Media news

How Niuzly wants to put control into the hands of journalists | Media news | making some noise | Scoop.it

New publishing platform Niuzly, which launched last month, allows writers to sell their articles to readers on for individual micropayments


Via Andy Bull
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Innovation Report - Newsroom innovation team –> Our recommendations

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This is a great paper from NYT about innovation in newsrooms.
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Media_Coverage_of_Banking_and_Financial_News.pdf

Christina Veiga's insight:

The  REUTERS INSTITUTE for the STUDY of JOURNALISM publisched recently a report about Media Coverage of Banking and Financial News

 “There is a substantial amount of goodwill between the financial industry and journalists. The media are not actively looking for negative stories in the financial sector and are willing to report on business news in a positive manner and with a neutral tone where possible. The media are however more likely to report on negative than on positive news about the banking sector, echoing the way they assess newsworthiness in other sectors.”
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Breaking news, sports, video | Boston.com

Breaking news, sports, video | Boston.com | making some noise | Scoop.it
24-hour breaking news, local news in Boston, and sports with coverage from The Boston Globe | Boston.com
Christina Veiga's insight:

The Boston Globe has got a new website.

I have been following, for the last couple of days,  the new The Boston Globe web page and I realy like it. It looks so much like a weblog.

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A print newspaper generated by robots: Is this the future of media or just a sideshow?

A print newspaper generated by robots: Is this the future of media or just a sideshow? | making some noise | Scoop.it
The Guardian has been experimenting with limited-edition printed newspapers that are produced by algorithms, based on the sharing habits of readers, and is rolling out a new version in the U.S. soon. But is that really what we want from our newspapers?
Christina Veiga's insight:
 The newspapers of the future will be written by robots?
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When starting from zero in journalism go for a niche site serving a narrow news interest well » Pressthink

Christina Veiga's insight:

An interesting text from Jay Rosen about journalism for niche in the present days.

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State of the News Media 2014

State of the News Media 2014 | making some noise | Scoop.it
The eleventh edition of an annual report by the Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project examining the landscape of American journalism. This year’s study includes special reports about the revenue picture for news, the growth in digital reporting, the role of acquisitions and content sharing in local news and developments around digital video. In addition, it provides the latest audience, economic, news investment and ownership trends for key sectors of news media, including a new, searchable Media & News Indicators database.
Christina Veiga's insight:

The Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project published this year’s study about the state of the news media in 2014. Here are the the most important conclusions:

 

1) Thirty of the largest digital-only news organizations account for about 3,000 jobs and one area of investment is global coverage.

 

2) So far, the impact of new money flowing into the industry may be more about fostering new ways of reporting and reaching audience than about building a new, sustainable revenue structure.

 

3) Social and mobile developments are doing more than bringing consumers into the process – they are also changing the dynamics of the process itself.

 

4) New ways of storytelling bring both promise and challenge.

 

5) Local television, which reaches about nine in ten U.S. adults, experienced massive change in 2013, change that stayed under the radar of most.

 

6) Dramatic changes under way in the makeup of the American population will undoubtedly have an impact on news in the U.S, and in one of the fastest growing demographic groups – Hispanics – we are already seeing shifts.

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In new media environment, the public decides who's a journalist | IJNet

In new media environment, the public decides who's a journalist | IJNet | making some noise | Scoop.it
IJNet.org is the premier global website for journalists and media managers to learn about training and networking opportunities. The site and its weekly e-mail bulletin reports on the latest innovations, resources and awards. IJNet publishes in Arabic, Chinese, English, Persian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. Users come from more than 185 countries.

Donors and media-training groups use IJNet to publicize their work to an ever-growing community dedicated to improving journalism.
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