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Sonnenborgh - museum & sterrenwacht

Sonnenborgh - museum & sterrenwacht | Making Movies | Scoop.it
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Discover the secrets of Sonnenborgh. Go behind the thick walls of the 16th Century Bastion to search for cannon emplacements. Climb the stairs up to the 19th Century telescope domes and gaze at the stars. Imagine yourself as a meteorologist and carry out exciting weather experiments or take a close up view of the Sun with the aid of a special solar telescope. The observatory and meteorological institute were established in 1854 on top of the old Sonnenborgh bastion which dates back to 1552. Scientists conducted research into the weather, the stars and planets, as well as time measurement. Today Sonnenborgh is both a museum and an observatory, and there is still a great deal to see and do.

 

Proposed BNLYFilm location in 2009

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Eben Moglen speaking at HOPE Number 9 in NYC about Walled Gardens and the First Law of Robotics

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FilmCity - You can afford the Best!

FilmCity - You can afford the Best! | Making Movies | Scoop.it
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Villa Baviera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Villa Baviera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

At its greatest extent, Villa Baviera was home to some three hundred German and Chilean residents and covered 137 square kilometers (53 sq mi). The main economic activity of the colony was agriculture, but it also contained a school, a free hospital, two airstrips, a restaurant, and even a power station.

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At its greatest extent, Villa Baviera was home to some three hundred German and Chilean residents and covered 137 square kilometers (53 sq mi).[2] The main economic activity of the colony was agriculture, but it also contained a school, a free hospital, two airstrips, a restaurant, and even a power station. The colony was secretive, surrounded by barbed wire fences, searchlights, and a watchtower, and contained secret weapon caches (including a tank). It was described alternately as a cult, or as a group of "harmless eccentrics". In recent decades, however, external investigations, including efforts by the Chilean government, uncovered a history of criminal activity in the enclave, include child sexual abuse.[3

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Sophocles

Sophocles | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Sophocles, one of the most influential writers of Ancient Greece, Sophocles Screenwriting Software
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Details about his life and work, developed presentations of his main plays, quotes and even less known facts about Sophocles, everything only on Sophocles !

You want more than just read about Sophocles? Travel and find his tracks! We tell you where to find him!

 

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FRANCO | Work of Director Francisco Campos-Lopez

FRANCO | Work of Director Francisco Campos-Lopez | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Work of Director Francisco Campos-Lopez
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BIO

He was born in a small town in Chile, and has been shooting since he was a young child. At 17, he moved to Santiago to begin his formal studies in film making. He attended the Chilean Film School (Escuela de Cine de Chile) in Santiago. After which he moved to Buenos Aires where he began his career as a filmmaker. While in Buenos Aires he was mentored by the finest in the Argentinean film industry in directing, screen-writing, editing and acting directing.

His award winning film, Acassis, -”Best Thriller Award” at the New York International Independent Film Festival 2007- has been shown worldwide. And it was his first approach to an international career. The New York press proclaimed him as one of “the upcoming Latin directors to watch”.
In 2009, Francisco relocated to the United States to continue his career as a filmmaker. The Department of Homeland Security of the U.S. granted him the O-1 Visa, for extraordinary ability in Arts. Francisco has the recognition of his peers in the States and from important unions, such as WGA.

His award-winning film, “The Tracer” (Co-Writer/Editor & Director) was shown at the NAB 2011 as one of the top 8 short films from the 48 Hours Film Festival, winning Best Picture and Best Cinematography at that prestigious festival.

In 2011 He was also awarded with a Telly (TM) for one of his music videos.Among his accolades, Campos-Lopez was featured as “Director of the Month” (October 2010) on Sony’s site for film/video professionals, Videon, having his work also featured in the “Shot Like a Pro” Sony print campaign all over the United States of America. And, the cover story in October 2010 in ONTap Magazine, with the story “Frankie’s Factory”, about his success launching music videos and partnership between independent artists in Washigton, DC.2011 marks his break into an international career, shooting documentaries and spots overseas working in Europe, Israel, South America and China, where he was honored to teach a Master Class for the Masters Students at Shanghai University.In 2013 he came back for a season to his native Chile to spend time with his daughter and joy of his life and to prepare his upcoming projects. He also got the chance to work; getting involved in political marketing, enviromental documentaries, activism and showing the beauty of his native Chile with promotional pieces.Francisco, also known as “Franco”, considers himself an author, from the inception of the idea/concept/story until final delivery.

Download CV and visit the IMDB.com Site

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The Paradox of Art as Work

The Paradox of Art as Work | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Art is imagined to exist in a realm of value that lies beyond mere economic considerations, but money is a key measure of artistic success.
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Art meets commerce: “Six Self Portraits” by Andy Warhol, to be featured in a Sotheby’s art auction; the price is estimated at $25 million to $35 million. Credit Sotheby’s

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There are few modern relationships as fraught as the one between art and money. Are they mortal enemies, secret lovers or perfect soul mates? Is the bond between them a source of pride or shame, a marriage of convenience or something tawdrier?

The way we habitually think and talk about these matters betrays a deep and venerable ambivalence. On one hand, art is imagined to exist in a realm of value that lies beyond and beneath mere economic considerations. The old phrase “starving artist” gestures toward an image that is both romantic and pathetic, of a person too pure, and also just too impractical, to make it in the world. When that person ceases to starve, he or she can always be labeled a sellout. You’re not supposed to be in it for the money.

On the other hand, money is now an important measure — maybe the supreme measure — of artistic accomplishment. Box office grosses have long since become part of the everyday language of cinephilia, as moviegoers absorb the conventional wisdom, once confined mainly to accountants and trade papers, about which movies are breaking out, breaking even or falling short. Multimillion-dollar sales of paintings by hot new or revered old artists are front-page news. To be a mainstream rapper is to have sold a lot of recordings on which you boast about how much money you have made selling your recordings.

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Andrew Garfield in April at the premiere of “The Amazing Spider-Man 2.” Credit Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images for Sony

Everyone might be sure that sales are not the only criterion of success, but no one is quite certain what the others might be, or how, in our data-obsessed era, they might be measured.

In the popular imagination, artists tend to exist either at the pinnacle of fame and luxury or in the depths of penury and obscurity — rarely in the middle, where most of the rest of us toil and dream. They are subject to admiration, envy, resentment and contempt, but it is odd how seldom their efforts are understood as work. Yes, it’s taken for granted that creating is hard, but also that it’s somehow fundamentally unserious. Schoolchildren may be encouraged (at least rhetorically) to pursue their passions and cultivate their talents, but as they grow up, they are warned away from artistic careers. This attitude, always an annoyance, is becoming a danger to the health of creativity itself. It may seem strange to say so, since we live at a time of cultural abundance and flowering amateurism, when the tools of creativity seem to be available to anyone with a laptop. But the elevation of the amateur over the professional trivializes artistic accomplishment and helps to undermine the already precarious living standards that artists have been able to enjoy.

“Making a living is nothing,” the novelist and critic Elizabeth Hardwick wrote in an essay titled “Grub Street: New York,” first published more than 50 years ago in the inaugural issue of The New York Review of Books. “The great difficulty is making a point, making a difference — with words.” She might just as well have said with images, sounds or the movement of bodies; words just happened to be her chosen medium. And her words in this case still stand as a concise, slightly scolding credo for the creative class. Nobody cares how you pay your rent. Your job is to show us something we didn’t know we needed to see.

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But it is, nonetheless, a job. The risk in separating the labor of making points and differences from its worldly reward lies in losing sight of the fact that it is labor, and therefore has a value that is material as well as abstract. In March, the National Endowment for the Arts released a report estimating that more than two million American workers identified themselves as artists, and noted that they had, since 2008, undergone the same bumpy, piecemeal recovery as other workers. An earlier report, from 2011, calculated that “the production of arts and cultural goods and services contributed $504.4 billion to the U.S. economy,” or 3.25 percent of gross domestic product. It may be relevant to note that the single largest category of artistic endeavor was advertising — a sign, perhaps, that the distinction between art and commerce is finally moot — but the upshot is that what artists do represents a significant quantifiable share of the nation’s wealth.

The question of who profits and who gets paid has become a contentious one. The cultural economy has always been mixed — a volatile blend of bazaar, bureaucracy and medieval court. Some parts of it appear, at least at first glance, to function by the rules of the free market. In reality, of course, this activity — represented by quaint, in some cases obsolescent institutions like the bookshop, the record store and the movie theater — has been governed by a complex web of middlemen and corporate players: agents, producers, movie studios, publishing houses, record companies and so on.

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The book “MFA vs. NYC,” edited by Chad Harbach. Credit Sonny Figueroa/The New York Times

That capitalist enterprise zone exists alongside, and in practice frequently overlaps with, a realm of patronage. Individual artists subsist on grants from foundations and the government, which along with corporations and wealthy donors support the institutions that bring those artists’ work to the public. When you buy your ticket and walk into a museum, a regional theater or a symphony hall, the experience you are purchasing has been subsidized by the philanthropists whose names are listed in the lobby.

And nearly every artist who makes a living (perhaps outside of advertising agencies) does so in this nexus of peddling and patronage. The recently published anthology “MFA vs. NYC” proposes, in its title, a dichotomy between the two dominant models of literary careerism: the subsidized route of graduate school and teaching, in which writers support themselves through paid activities other than writing; and the rough-and-tumble marketplace of New York City, where writers more or less do the same thing but with a different attitude. New York, as the headquarters of the publishing industry, the domestic art market and segments of the television and movies businesses, shines with the credentializing luster of capitalism. Of course, making it here is costly enough to require other forms of paying work, or parental subsidy. The academy offers a degree of security, along with time and space to work, but can also be, in the age of the adjunct instructor, a place of alienation and exploitation.

The argument that threads through many of the essays in “MFA vs NYC” is that both creative business models are, in the jargon of the moment, being disrupted, as technological and economic forces combine to exert downward pressure on writers’ incomes. The signs of this disruption are not hard to find. Magazines that once paid by the word and employed healthy rosters of staff writers are now recruiting readers to contribute articles, offering to compensate them with exposure and “prestige.” Digital music services like Pandora and Spotify pay minuscule royalties to artists whose songs they stream. Meanwhile, in the nondigital domain of musical performance, symphony orchestras and opera companies have undergone several seasons of labor trouble, as managers from Minnesota to the Metropolitan Opera cite sluggish ticket sales and stagnant endowments and try to wrest salary and benefit concessions from unionized rank-and-file musicians and singers.

“Everything is free now,” the folk singer Gillian Welch sang in 2001, reacting prophetically to the threat of Napster.

Everything I’ve ever done

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Members of the union representing the Metropolitan Opera chorus wait to start recent contract talks. Credit Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Gonna give it away

Someone hit the big score

They figured it out

We were gonna do it anyway

Even if it didn’t pay.

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Money collected for the Minnesota Orchestra musicians, who were locked out. Credit Jenn Ackerman for The New York Times

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In the years since, the big score has been realized by technology and social media companies, which have enticed users to generate content for nothing. “If there’s something that you want to hear/You can sing it yourself,” Ms. Welch sang. The subsequent history of the Internet has turned this “Atlas Shrugged”-like idea on its head, enshrining democratic amateurism as a cultural norm and a Utopian possibility. We can all do it anyway — make our own videos and songs, write our own poetry and personal essays, exhibit our paintings and our selves — even if it doesn’t pay.

Digital amateurism also sells itself as an alternative route to professional riches. Competitive reality television, Kickstarter campaigns and cooperative self-publishing ventures offer the lure of fame and fortune accomplished without the usual middlemen. The idea that everyone can be an artist — making stuff that can be shared, traded or sold to a self-selecting audience of fellow creators — sits awkwardly alongside the self-contradictory dream that everyone can be a star.

The result is, or threatens to become, a stratification that mirrors the social and economic inequality undermining our civic life. A concentration of big stars, blockbusters and best sellers — Beyoncé, “The Avengers” and their ilk — will sit at the top of the ladder. An army of striving self-starters will swarm at the bottom rungs, hoping that their homemade videos go viral, their self-published memoir catches fire or their MFA thesis show catches the eye of a wealthy buyer. The middle ranks — home to modestly selling writers, semi-popular bands, working actors, local museums and orchestras — are being squeezed out of existence.

The middle — that place where professionals do their work in conditions that are neither lavish nor improvised, for a reasonable living wage — is especially vulnerable to collapse because its existence has rarely been recognized in the first place. Nobody would argue against the idea that art has a social value, and yet almost nobody will assert that society therefore has an obligation to protect that value by acknowledging, and compensating, the labor of the people who produce it.

And artists themselves, outside of unionized industries like television and movies, are unlikely to perceive defending the value of what they do as an interest they hold in common. But it is not necessarily in their nature to be any more individualistic or competitive than anybody else, and they may have a lot to teach the rest of us about the meaning of work. If the supposedly self-involved members of the creative class can organize to assert some control over what they make — the magical stuff now routinely referred to as “content” — then maybe other residents of the beleaguered middle might be inspired by their examples.

Inexpensive goods carry hidden costs, and those costs are frequently borne by exploited, underpaid workers. This is true of our clothes and our food, and it is no less true of those products we turn to for meaning, pleasure and diversion. We will no doubt continue to indulge all kinds of romantic conceits about artists: myths about the singularity of genius or the equal distribution of talent; clichés about flaky, privileged weirdos; inspiring tales of dreamers who persevered. But we also need to remember, with all the political consequences that this understanding entails, that they are just doing their jobs.

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Netherlands Film Festival | Professionals home page | Nederlands Film Festival

Netherlands Film Festival | Professionals home page | Nederlands Film Festival | Making Movies | Scoop.it
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The future of video on Vimeo

We interview people from Vimeo, Adobe, Blackmagic design, Motionographer, Cinema 4D, Sehsucht, Mashable, Digital Bolex and many more. We get a vision of where…
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The Guy Behind The KONY 2012 Video Finally Explains How Everything Went So Weird

The Guy Behind The KONY 2012 Video Finally Explains How Everything Went So Weird | Making Movies | Scoop.it
First interview since his public meltdown.

Via mirmilla
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Red Digital Cinema shows off dev kit to make its cameras app-controlable

Red Digital Cinema shows off dev kit to make its cameras app-controlable | Making Movies | Scoop.it
The Redlink Bridge is the module stuck onto the far left of the camera shown here.
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The Vivian Maier Scholarship Fund

The Vivian Maier Scholarship Fund | Making Movies | Scoop.it
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The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), one of the nation’s leading art and design schools, announced the establishment of the endowed Vivian Maier Scholarship Fund. The need-based scholarship was made possible by generous donations from Ravine Pictures’ John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, and art gallerist Howard Greenberg.

Because Vivian Maier’s work has changed lives—John’s in particular—we are forever indebted to her. That is why a share of the proceeds from sales of her work and the film Finding Vivian Maier are used to create an endowed and permanent scholarship—the Vivian Maier Scholarship—at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, an institution that was important to Vivian. Every year, young photographers will receive financial assistance allowing them to pursue their art with some of the economic burden lifted, thanks to Vivian Maier. This will be another one of Vivian’s gifts to the world and another part of her legacy.

“We are thrilled and grateful for the donation we received from John Maloof, Charlie Siskel, and Howard Greenberg to establish the Vivian Maier Scholarship Fund,” said SAIC alumna Ellen Sandor (MFA 1975), Life Trustee of the Art Institute of Chicago, member of SAIC’s Board of Governors and Chair of the Advisory Board of the Gene Siskel Film Center. “With the establishment of this scholarship and our relationship with Ravine Pictures and the Howard Greenberg Gallery, emerging female artists at SAIC will have significant opportunities to pursue their passions for years to come.”

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Aisha Tyler's 'Self-Inflicted Wounds' Headed for TV (Exclusive)

Aisha Tyler's 'Self-Inflicted Wounds' Headed for TV (Exclusive) | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Aisha Tyler's book Self-Inflicted Wounds is getting the TV treatment.
CBS Television Studios has optioned the actress-comedian's New York Times best-selling book, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.
Self-Inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humiliation is a series of comic essays about times in Tyler's life that she found herself in the middle of humiliating incidents and the lessons that she's learned about embracing failure on the road to success.
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For Tyler, the project comes as she continues her voice work on FX's animated comedy Archer, currently in its fifth season and renewed through season seven. She also hosts The CW's Whose Line Is It Anyway and is a co-host on CBS' The Talk. On the acting side, she has a role in HBO's Ryan Murphy drama pilot Open. Tyler is repped by UTA, ROAR and Hansen Jacobson

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janariebuijs

janariebuijs | Making Movies | Scoop.it
All what's in a man's mind....
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Recent PostsI’m in love ….. (2014) March 22, 2014Giving It All Away – Roger Daltrey (1973) March 22, 2014Message In A Bottle – The Police (1979) March 22, 2014The Man With The Child In His Eyes – Kate Bush (1978) March 22, 2014Rain – The Beatles (1966) March 21, 2014Someone else – Miley Cyrus (2013) March 21, 2014Love Is In The Air – John Paul Young (1977) March 20, 2014Don’t Give Up – Peter Gabriel (1986) March 20, 2014It’s a Beautiful Day – Michael Bubble (2013) March 20, 2014Morning Dew – Robert Plant (2002) March 19, 2014Army Of Me – Björk (1995) March 18, 2014Brand New Start – Paul Weller (1988) March 17, 2014De zonderlinge avonturen van het geniale bommenmeisje – Jonas Jonasson March 17, 2014Lazy Sunday – The Small Faces (1968) March 16, 2014Een Mooie Jonge Vrouw March 16, 2014The End Of The Show – The Cats (1980) March 15, 2014Buiten slapen March 15, 2014I Am A Rock – Simon and Garfunkel (1965) -2- March 14, 2014A Forest – The Cure (1980) March 13, 2014Verdronken Vlinder/Beneden Alle Peil – Boudewijn de Groot (1969) March 13, 2014ArchiefMarch 2014 (35)February 2014 (41)January 2014 (42)December 2013 (34)November 2013 (29)October 2013 (20)September 2013 (20)August 2013 (18)July 2013 (20)Categories00's (8)10's (12)60's (17)70's (32)80's (29)90's (11)Boeken (17)films (4)foto's (37)gedichten (12)Muziek (50)playlist (3)songs (143)Uncategorized (257)
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Fwd: Our Mission No Evictions : #RealChile : ULUV Music Day : Gringolandia : Chile California Council : Los Prisioneros : Agep-v Ladies in Sausalito : Calle 24 : Urban Music Presents : Stanford Chi...

Fwd: Our Mission No Evictions : #RealChile : ULUV Music Day : Gringolandia : Chile California Council : Los Prisioneros : Agep-v Ladies in Sausalito : Calle 24 : Urban Music Presents : Stanford Chi... | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Google's approach to email
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You may recall that this year I joined the production team of Earth Day. Well, don't be surprised if I end up an activist, living in Chile, working on nothing but environmental issues.

Since I started attending seminars on the Chilean economic boom and its foreign investment potential 20 years ago, I've been asking why isn't eco-tourism part of the economic growth equation? Is it an oversight?
Or is it that eco-tourism requires environmental laws that target the industrial complex already set in motion and creating ecological havoc in Chile?

Dear leaders: may I introduce you to the most important word today in order to keep ourselves from self-extinction: sustainability.
"Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment.  Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations." EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency

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Hotel Rey Don Felipe - Punta Arenas - Chile

Hotel Rey Don Felipe - Punta Arenas - Chile | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Hotel Rey Don Felipe brings an architectural design inspired by the traditions and history of the province of Magallanes, with cozy and comfortable interior spaces, where guests will find in addition to charm, modern amenities and technology. Small details that make it an ideal place to host business men and women as well as families and groups with tourism interests in the southernmost city of the continent.
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http://vimeo.com/44347211

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Beagle conflict - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Beagle conflict

The Beagle Conflict Main: Beagle conflict The Beagle conflict was a border dispute between Chile and Argentina over the possession of Picton, Lennox and Nueva islands and the scope of the maritime jurisdiction associated with those islands that brought the countries to the brink of war in 1978.

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The Beagle conflict is seen as the main reason for Chilean support to the United Kingdom during the Falklands War of 1982.[3][4]

The conflict began in 1904 with the first official Argentine claims over the islands that have always been under Chilean control.[5]:§164 The conflict passed through several phases: since 1881 Chilean islands, since 1904 disputed islands, direct negotiations, submitted to a binding international tribunal, direct negotiations again, brinkmanship and settlement.

The conflict was resolved through papal mediation and since 1984 Argentina recognizes the islands as Chilean territory. The 1984 treaty resolves also several collateral issues of great importance, including navigation rights, sovereignty over other islands in the Fuegian Archipelago, delimitation of the Straits of Magellan, and maritime boundaries south to Cape Horn and beyond.

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Moovly - Create Animated Content like a Pro

Moovly - Create Animated Content like a Pro | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Moovly is an online tool that allows you to create animated videos, tutorials, explainers, presentations, infographics, video clips, display ads or e-cards.

Via Nik Peachey
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José A. Medina. EdD's curator insight, December 31, 2013 7:08 AM

Creación de videos animados

Jasmin Hodge's curator insight, March 20, 6:48 AM

another one!

Sherryl Perry's curator insight, May 30, 6:00 AM

This is a real find. The free version looks powerful enough for many small businesses to use without having to upgrade to a premium package.

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Betty Cornell | Embarrassing Treasures

Betty Cornell | Embarrassing Treasures | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Posts about Betty Cornell written by Amy
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About the Author: Betty Cornell is not the pensive blond on the book’s front cover—she is the white-gloved brunette on the inset photos and the back cover. In the 1940s, she was one of the country’s busiest models of juniors’ fashions, but she actually got her start modeling plus-size clothes. She tells her own story in this book’s introduction—the story of how she went from a “tubby teen” to the possessor of “one of the smallest waistlines of any model in New York.”

At age 16, she decided to “really go to work” on her weight problem. By 1947, according to this syndicated newspaper column, she stood 5’ 8.5” tall and weighed only 90 pounds! (The article claims that her waist measured 19.5 inches, and her hips and bust were both 30 inches.)

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More thoughts on Maier

More thoughts on Maier | Making Movies | Scoop.it

Via Street Shooters
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Voordekunst - Solle

Voordekunst - Solle | Making Movies | Scoop.it
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De film Solle is een romantisch liefdesdrama gebaseerd op Solle, een Jongensboek van de Zeeuwse schrijver Andreas Oosthoek, wat naar verwachting in de loop van dit jaar zal verschijnen. Solle, gebaseerd op waargebeurde feiten, vertelt de geschiedenis van twee jongens die aan het begin van een ontluikende adolescentie, op zoek zijn naar een eigen identiteit. Ze worden geconfronteerd met hun liefde voor elkaar in een tijd dat dit onbespreekbaar was. Die wetenschap werkt voor Solle eerst benauwend en beklemmend, later bevrijdend. Een hechte, intieme vriendschap ontluikt, die zich in de wereldstad Parijs verder ontwikkelt. Het verhaal speelt zich af in het naoorlogse, traditionele Zeeland en deels in het mondaine Parijs van de jaren zestig.

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Video Publishing by Robin Good | ZEEF

Video Publishing by Robin Good | ZEEF | Making Movies | Scoop.it
The best tools and services to capture, edit, publish and distribute video online.
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AJA's 4K camera runs $9,000, but nobody will mistake you for a tourist

AJA's 4K camera runs $9,000, but nobody will mistake you for a tourist | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Though AJA is best known for disk recorders, it's just revealed the 4K CION, its first cinema camera. It'll take on BlackMagic Design and a growing list of 4K DSLRs -- including Sony's new Alpha A7s and the Panasonic GH4.
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Flying high above Vegas with the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone

Flying high above Vegas with the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone | Making Movies | Scoop.it
There's been a lot of killer gear here at NAB, from Sony's Alpha A7s to the Blackmagic URSA. But of all the gadgets that debuted in Vegas this week, I'm
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There's been a lot of killer gear here at NAB, from Sony's Alpha A7s to the Blackmagic URSA. But of all the gadgets that debuted in Vegas this week, I'm most obsessed with DJI's Phantom 2 Vision+ drone. This year's version represents a significant boost over 2013's model, due to one brilliant feature: a three-axis gimbal. The flying craft sports an integrated 1080p camera that can shoot solid stills and video alike, but the gimbal adds serious stabilization, keeping footage impossibly still, whether you're flying at 30MPH, caught in a gust of wind or simply hovering above the ground. The built-in GPS and compass keep the device on track at all times, letting you focus not on staying aloft, but on getting the shot.

Camera-equipped drones are a dime a dozen these days, but assuming you have the $1,300 to burn, DJI's Vision+ is the one you want. The autonomous features at play here enable very stable footage, while the intuitive control and Android and iOS apps make it easy to fly and get the shot, without any experience at all. The drone can shoot and fly for 25 minutes on a single charge, and while climbing can use a bit more power, you can move left and right all you want without accelerating drain. The camera, designed in-house by DJI, captures to a microSD card. You get a live preview from the app, though, making framing a shot, changing modes and snapping still photos a breeze. Take the Vision+ for a spin in our video below, complete with some fantastic aerial footage of the Vegas skyline.

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LuckyTV | English

LuckyTV | English | Making Movies | Scoop.it
LuckyTV. Uw dagelijkse mediarevolte na De Wereld Draait Door. Bekijk hier de laatste Lucky of bezoek het ontzagwekkende LuckyTV videoarchief: honderden filmpjes uit DWDD, De Staat van Verwarring, Vara Laat, Jensen en meer. LuckyTV. Wir leben Fernsehen.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

LuckyTV is a Dutch video artist. Since 2002, LuckyTV produced over 2000 short satirical video’s, commissioned by various Dutch broadcasting companies and television programmes.

Since 2005, LuckyTV is a daily segment in Vara’s daily show De Wereld Draait Door

LuckyTV’s contributions commonly deal with current events and the daily news, often using actual news footage; manipulating images, cutting up interviews and footage into mock reports, painful conversations or absurd news items.

LuckyTV is created by Sander van de Pavert (1976). Van de Pavert studied Graphic Design at the Willem de Kooning Academy in Rotterdam. He currently works and lives in The Hague.

Below you’ll find a selection of English language video’s, either English spoken or with English subtitles.

 
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Pagatim | Branded Audio

Pagatim | Branded Audio | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

PAGATIM’s expert team of audio storytellers will help identify and shape your most compelling stories for social and mobile platforms. Our audio programming works to engage your customers’ imagination with a consistent offering of unique and memorable content.
What does that mean? Working with PAGATIM = a concierge experience in audio. Start your VIP treatment now.

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The Poet Photographer

The Poet Photographer | Making Movies | Scoop.it
Visions From Within
Jan Bergmans's insight:

The Beast
The
Beast sighs,
Menacing deep snarl.
Fear ripples through sinewed
Taught jaw and clenched teeth.
Inhibited anger emerges, twists, cries out,
Out of reason’s insane shadow.
See, whispers the Beast,
No more illusions.
All is
God.

© David R. Durham, All Rights Reserved.

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