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Teleradiology Testimonials | Excalibur Healthcare

Teleradiology Testimonials | Excalibur Healthcare | makehealthbuddies.com | Scoop.it
Dr. Greene employs a holistic approach, putting his knowledge of medicine to work with how the study and history all fit together with the patient.
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Amazing Benefits Of Almond Milk

Amazing Benefits Of Almond Milk | makehealthbuddies.com | Scoop.it
Talking about almond milk benefits, there is very many benefits of it and could be touted as a good substitute for regular milk.

Via Anushka Chopra
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Younger Skin Through Exercise

Younger Skin Through Exercise | makehealthbuddies.com | Scoop.it
Exercise appears to slow and even reverse the effects of aging on the skin.

 

Exercise not only appears to keep skin younger, it may also even reverse skin aging in people who start exercising late in life, according to surprising new research.

 

As many of us know from woeful experience, our skin changes as the years advance, resulting in wrinkles, crow’s feet and sagging skin. This occurs because of changes within our layers of skin. After about age 40, most of us begin to experience a thickening of our stratum corneum, the final, protective, outer layer of the epidermis, itself the top layer of your skin. The stratum corneum is the portion of the skin that you see and feel. Composed mostly of dead skin cells and some collagen, it gets drier, flakier and denser with age.


Via PAT NOVAK
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Core work: a runner's guide

Core work: a runner's guide | makehealthbuddies.com | Scoop.it
All runners – well, all exercisers, really – know they should do core work. But if you are anything like me, without some guidance you'll run out of ideas after the plank and some crunches

Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by makehealthbuddies from Heart and Vascular Health
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Dental Surgery and Antiplatelet Agents: Bleed or Die

Dental Surgery and Antiplatelet Agents: Bleed or Die | makehealthbuddies.com | Scoop.it

In patients taking antiplatelet medications who are undergoing dental surgery, physicians and dentists must weigh the bleeding risks in continuing antiplatelet medications versus the thrombotic risks in interrupting antiplatelet medications. Bleeding complications requiring more than local measures for hemostasis are rare after dental surgery in patients taking antiplatelet medications. Conversely, the risk for thrombotic complications after interruption of antiplatelet therapy for dental procedures apparently is significant, although small. When a clinician is faced with a decision to continue or interrupt antiplatelet therapy for a dental surgical patient, the decision comes down to “bleed or die.” That is, there is a remote chance that continuing antiplatelet therapy will result in a (nonfatal) bleeding problem requiring more than local measures for hemostasis versus a small but significant chance that interrupting antiplatelet therapy will result in a (possibly fatal) thromboembolic complication. The decision is simple: It is time to stop interrupting antiplatelet therapy for dental surgery.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, April 13, 2014 1:36 PM

From the paper's conclusion:

When a clinician is faced with a decision to continue or interrupt antiplatelet therapy for a dental surgical patient, the decision comes down to “bleed or die.” That is, there is a remote (∼0.2%) chance that continuing antiplatelet therapy will result in a (nonfatal) bleeding problem requiring more than local measures for hemostasis versus an unknown but significant chance that interrupting antiplatelet therapy will result in a (possibly fatal) thromboembolic complication. The decision is fairly simple: It is time to stop interrupting antiplatelet therapy for dental surger