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Earthly concerns concerning us 'coz we are all interelated...
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Dolphin murals spark marine awareness campaign in Philippines

Dolphin murals spark marine awareness campaign in Philippines | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
A painter's spontaneous reaction to slaughter of dolphins shown in The Cove turns into a movement for protecting ocean life...

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Save Philippine Seas » SPS Takes Part in Japan Dolphins Day 2012

Save Philippine Seas » SPS Takes Part in Japan Dolphins Day 2012 | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

August 31, 2012 by carlo:  "Japan Dolphins Day is a worldwide protest to stop the annual massive slaughter and capture of cetaceans in Taiji, Japan, which starts on September 1.  In the Philippines, Earth Island Institute (EII) Philippines leads the protest in front of the Japanese Embassy. This year, SPS participated in this event along with Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), Compassion & Responsibility for Animals (CARA), People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA  Asia-Pacific), and Save Freedom Island Movement.  This was my first time to represent SPS in this annual activity..."


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AN OPEN LETTER TO MANILA OCEAN PARK | Earth Island Philippines

AN OPEN LETTER TO MANILA OCEAN PARK  | Earth Island Philippines | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
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Manila Ocean Park: Don't bring Beluga Whales to the Philippines, return them to the Arctic sea

Manila Ocean Park: Don't bring Beluga Whales to the Philippines, return them to the Arctic sea | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

This is a campaign to stop Manila Ocean Park from bringing in Beluga Whales into the Philippines. Beluga Whales are arctic marine mammals & thus are meant to live in the coldness of the vast arctic seas, not in a refrigerated pool with limited space in the hot, polluted city of Manila.

 

We are against animal captivity & cruelty.


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REPAIRING ECOSYSTEMS—SIX LESSONS FROM HISTORY

REPAIRING ECOSYSTEMS—SIX LESSONS FROM HISTORY | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
Because the availability of choices dictates the amount of control we feel we have over our sense of security, a potential loss of money is the breeding ground for environmental injustice. This is ...

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Most mammals won't flee climate change fast enough

Most mammals won't flee climate change fast enough | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
As the climate changes over the next century, the ranges of nearly 90 percent of mammal species will shrink — in many cases because animals won't be able to get to areas where the climate is going to become suitable for them, says new research.
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Breaking News: Sea Shepherd Captain Paul Watson Arrested in Frankfurt, Germany

Breaking News: Sea Shepherd Captain Paul Watson Arrested in Frankfurt, Germany | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
via Sea Shepherd South Africa: BREAKING NEWS: Via Scott West – “Captain Paul Watson was arrested today at Frankfurt airport on a warrant for his arrest for his intervention for the shar...

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Biodiversity Loss Could Hit Ecosystems as Hard as Climate Change

Biodiversity Loss Could Hit Ecosystems as Hard as Climate Change | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
With intermediate levels of biodiversity loss, the effect on plant productivity could be as bad as climate change. At high levels, it could be worse.
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So long, and thanks for all the fish! Dolphins help Brazilian fisherman catch their prey, then swim off (but what's in it for them?)

So long, and thanks for all the fish! Dolphins help Brazilian fisherman catch their prey, then swim off (but what's in it for them?) | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
The bottlenose dolphins of Laguna, Brazil, will herd mullet fish towards the fishermen and then - with a flick of their heads and tails - splash the water to let the boats know their haul is ready.

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Cubao dolphin show execs going to trial for cruelty to animals / Philippine Daily Inquirer

Cubao dolphin show execs going to trial for cruelty to animals / Philippine Daily Inquirer | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

TODAY, MAY 2, 2012, IN PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER.  Acting on the criminal complaint filed by Earth Island Institute (EII) and the Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), Quezon City Prosecutors recommended the filing of charges against the Indofil Sea Wonders Ltd., promoters of a traveling dolphin show last December 2010.

 


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Photo of Freedom Island Before and After Series of Coastal Clean-ups

Photo of Freedom Island Before and After Series of Coastal Clean-ups | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

This would not be possible without the help of those who volunteered in the clean-up campaigns. Thank you very much from Earth Island Institute Philippines (EII-Phils), Save Freedom Island Movement (SFIM) and Wild Bird Club of the Philippines (WBCP)! This is a big victory for all of us and for Mother Earth, but our fight against trash and the reclamation project isn't over yet. Let's further strengthen our unity and widen our campaign even more. YES, WE CAN DO THIS!

 

PHOTO FROM EHRALD MENDOZA


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Catastrophe for Dolphin off Peru | Ecology Global Network

Catastrophe for Dolphin off Peru | Ecology Global Network | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
An apocalyptic dolphin die-off is occurring along the coastline of Peru. The reasons for this are as yet unknown, though several culprits have emerged.
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Maui's dolphins' survival near 'point of no return

Maui's dolphins' survival near 'point of no return | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

he survival of the critically endangered Maui's dolphin species will soon be "past the point of no return" unless emergency action is taken, an expert says.

What is believed to be a Maui's dolphin was found dead by a member of the public in Taranaki last week. 


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Youth solon calls on schools to ban field trips to theme parks with captive dolphins, whales

Youth solon calls on schools to ban field trips to theme parks with captive dolphins, whales | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

Joining the call of various environmental groups to protect dolphins and whales, Kabataan Partylist Rep. Raymond Palatino has filed a resolution in Congress urging the Department of Education (DepED) and Commission on Higher Education (CHED) to ban school field trips to theme parks that possess captive dolphins and whales that come from “cruel and inhumane sources.”

 

The youth solon filed on September 5 House Resolution No. 2759, calling for the House of Representatives to direct DepEd and CHED to prohibit such type of field trips.

“School field trips are designed to expand the students’ learning through live interaction. However, dolphin and whale shows teach children the wrong values that keeping wild animals in captivity is acceptable,” Palatino said.

 

In several researches, including a government-commissioned study in the United Kingdom, it was shown that watching dolphins perform in marine parks generate no significant knowledge about the said animals, Palatino said. “The prime target of ocean parks with captive dolphins and whales are students, when in fact there is not much to learn from these facilities,” he added.

“What’s more, the demand for captive whales and dolphins is the primary motivation behind the deadly dolphin and whale hunts in various countries, including Japan and the Solomon Islands,” Palatino explained.

 

Several non-profit organizations, including Earth Island Institute Philippines, have raised concerns on the said dolphin and whale hunts that have grossly decreased the number of said animals in the past years.

 

In Taiji, Japan, annual dolphin killings occur in September of every year. Fishermen try to catch “good-looking” dolphins which they sell to marine parks. Once the nicer looking animals are chosen, the rest of the catch is slaughtered. In 2007, a record 1,239 dolphins and whales were caught in such hunts, with most of the animals ending up being slaughtered.

 

Dolphins and whales from Japanese hunts have reportedly found its way into the Philippines, despite the enactment of Republic Act 8485 or the Animal Welfare Act, which bans and punishes any kind of torture and maltreatment of any animal, and the Fisheries Administrative Order 185 which prohibits the catching, killing and mere possession of dolphins in the Philippines.

 

“Various studies have also shown that keeping dolphins and whales in captivity also shortens the life span of these animals,” Palatino said. In Ocean Adventure Park in Subic, four out of five false killer whales and a bottlenose dolphin used for performances have already died. All of these animals were from Japan.

 

“Is this what we want our youngsters to learn – that people would risk endangering the lives of endangered animals just for entertainment? The nation’s youth deserves the right to be informed correctly and protected from misleading facts,” Palatino said.

 

“DepEd and CHED have moral obligations to ensure that students learn the real value of environmental conservation, and holding field trips in ocean parks is simply not the way to teach such,” Palatino added.###


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PHILIPPINE GROUPS PROTEST LARGEST DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER IN THE WORLD | Press Release | Earth Island Philippines Web Portal

PHILIPPINE GROUPS PROTEST LARGEST DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER IN THE WORLD | Press Release | Earth Island Philippines Web Portal | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

Wearing t-shirts saying ‘End Captivity! End the Slaughter!’ protesters led by Earth Island Institute-Philippines (EII-Phils.), Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) and the Save Freedom Island Movement (SFIM) trooped to the Japanese embassy along Roxas boulevard to protest the largest dolphin slaughter on the planet which is starts September of every year in Japan.

 

In Taiji (Japan) some twenty-six fishermen herd hundreds of small whales and dolphins to a cove. Ocean parks and aquariums buy the nicer looking animals for dolphin shows while the rest are slaughtered in what many experts say is the largest and most inhumane killing of dolphins in the world.

 

The hunt is the subject of the 2010 Oscar-winning documentary, The Cove, which sparked a global movement that is calling on Japan to end the dolphin slaughter. This year, some 80 organizations in 77 cities in 29 countries will take part in the International Dolphin Day protests in front of their Japanese embassies.

 

Unknown to many, dolphins from the cruel hunts had been imported into the Philippines. In 2001, the country imported 5 false killer whales, four of which are now dead. Another 4 bottlenose dolphins arrived in the country in 2004, one of which has died. In 2009, another 4 bottlenose dolphins were imported from Japan. All the animals are now at the Ocean Adventure facility in Subic.

 

“In the Philippines it is illegal to torture or maltreat any animal under the Animal Welfare Act (RA 8485). Also, Fisheries Administrative Order 185 bans the catching, selling or mere possession of dolphins. Why then were dolphins from such cruel sources allowed into the country?” asks Cha Laxamana of the Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS).

 

“This issue is not just about dolphins, it is about human rights, too,” says Roy Velez of the Save the Freedom Island Movement (SFIM), “The Japanese people have the right to know what is going on in Taiji, and the right to know that the dolphin meat from the hunts is heavily contaminated with mercury, a highly toxic substance.”

 

Earth Island Institute, which has been leading the global effort to stop the dolphin hunts in Japan, is calling on all Filipinos to boycott all existing facilities in the country which features dolphins or marine mammals.

 

“If we truly care about dolphins, we should never visit facilities such as Ocean Adventure, the Misamis Occidental Aquamarine Park (MOAP), and other facilities such as Manila Ocean Park (MOP) which plans to have dolphin shows,” says Trixie Concepcion of Earth Island Institute.

Concepcion concludes: “If we stop buying tickets to dolphin shows, then dolphins in Taiji may just survive.” #######

 

END DOLPHIN CAPTIVITY! END THE SLAUGHTER!

 

----------------------------------------

View pictures through this link: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.493254477368631.125764.25745623...


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Some Reasons Why Cetaceans like Beluga whales are not suitable for Captivity (Especially in Manila Ocean Park)

Some Reasons Why Cetaceans like Beluga whales are not suitable for Captivity (Especially in Manila Ocean Park) | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it

To be able to grasp the real issue, it's good to know about the nature of beluga whales, first...

 

1. Beluga whales or white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) belong to the cetacean family (whales, dolphins, porpoises). Of course, you already knew that as marine mammals, they breathe air through lungs, they give birth to calves, suckling their young, etc. Basic biology – we don't need to touch on that.

 

But what is distinct with these marine mammals is that they are capable of echolacation which acts like a biological sonar. They make up with their generally poor eye sight with an excellent hearing which they use for hunting and communicating. The echolocating skill in most Odontoceti (toothed whales), a sub-order where beluga whales belong, is so advanced that they can search and identify preys and non-preys, landscapes, shapes, colors, textures, directions, etc. in total darkness and even in long distances (say, a dozen of miles away). In short, their ears are very sensitive to sound.

 

This ability is nature's gift to them, but in an enclosed facility with a big crowd to watch on them (not to mention all the noises from the warm applauses) that could be torture.

 

2. I think you have also heard that belugas are called the canaries of the sea. They are called so because of the high-pitched tones that they produce which sounds like chirping / tweeting. Those chirps aid them in echolocating.

 

In captivity, this highly-evolved and refined echolocation skill will be suppressed since sound in captivity tanks bounces off concrete walls in a maddening reverberation. That's why these canaries of the sea simply “stop singing” while in captivity tanks. It, therefore, suppresses the most fundamental mode of their communication and survival.

 

3. Their evolution, as well as their ability to echolocate, are highly adapted to the icy seas of the Arctic. While other pods migrate during the winter, others stay under the icepack and still survives, surfacing occasionally to breathe when there's patches of open water in the dense ice. It is said that their ability to find even thin slivers of open water mystifies scientists.

 

While it is a universally accepted fact that beluga whales cannot thrive in the tropics, some people would insist that the conditions in the Arctic could be simulated in captivity. Where? In Manila Ocean Park? Well, good luck! I just hope that we shall not risk another animal's life just because of human neglect or machine malfunction. Even Ocean Park Hong Kong already aborted this plan because of practical reasons.

 

4. In terms of their diet, we all know that they feed on live fish, squids, octopus and crustaceans. Have you wondered if they need to drink fresh water like most of living creatures need? No. They get their fresh water from their preys. Live fish offer moisture to hydrate the whales and dolphins in the wild. While in captivity, they are fed dead frozen fish which lacks the moisture they need. They may be hydrated by eating ice or jello; or by a water hose forced into its throat, though.

 

5. In the Arctic seas, they swim daily in wide-ranging undersea treks, have 1000-meter dives, and even travel annual transcontinental migration. I guess you may have the idea on how boring it is to go round in circles in a tank. Immobility could also physically weaken them. Solitary confinement is another issue since they are social animals.

 

6. There are scientific studies saying that captive cetaceans like dolphins and whales are capable of having depression, may suffer disorientation and even “lost their sanity” because of this, sometimes resulting to unlikely behaviors like bumping their heads against the wall, aggressiveness, violence, and even suicide.

 

If you have heard of the famous TV series in the 80's “Flipper,” you might have encountered the story of Kathy, one of the dolphins that portrayed Flipper. She committed a suicide by intentionally closing her blow hole (we recommend you to watch The Cove if you want to know more about this). There are also cases that captive cetaceans attack their trainers resulting to mutilation and even death of the latter.

 

7. Of course captive cetaceans poop and pee in their tanks... a lot! And since the facility couldn't afford to replace the water everyday, the water is often chemically treated. There are recorded incidents that dolphins and whales suffer chlorine poisoning, skin ulcers, blindness, and skin diseases. Deaths caused by pneumonia, influenza, intestinal disease, shock and bacterial infections are also common. These diseases might also be transferred to humans. To think that that some captive facilities allow visitors to touch, kiss and even swim with them.

 

8. And since conservation is one of the issues often discussed, let me present some facts and issues on cetacean reproduction. A female beluga usually gives birth to one calf every three years. Their mating season occurs between February and May in the wild and gestation usually lasts a year or more. It is also interesting that they have midwives/ nurses in the pod.

 

Sex is very important in a cetacean's life, but in captivity, they are forced to undergo a breeding program in the name of “conservation” wherein the mothers are often bred even before they reach sexual maturity.

 

Captive facilities like Sea World could completely control the animal's reproduction processes through artificial insemination which involves the insertion of an endoscope, a catheter, and the sperm directly into the uterus (sperms came from males that were manually stimulated until ejaculation); “facultative-induced ovulation” using serial urinary hormone monitoring and ovarian ultrasound; and control on the estrous cycles to synchronize them through “oral synthetic progestagen treatment.” They can also force to breed them more often than it occurs in the wild.

 

Remember that a captive facility would invest so much on this not primarily due to conservation purposes but because this is part of expanding the business. The results of this kind of motivation are many deaths in birth of the offspring and even death to the mothers.

 

9. Still in conservation, there is no disagreement that beluga whales are in danger, too, in the wild as there are poachers, pollution, climate change, predators, etc. Some of you might think that captivity is the ultimate solution to save these animals; that putting them in a controlled environment would at least keep them alive and far from those threats. While the first premise is, indeed, true; we couldn't agree with the second assumption because, on the contrary, the captivity industry fuels poaching that further leads to the decline of the species, destruction of their habitat, and irreversible impacts to the ecosystem.

 

We must need to understand that beluga whales just don't feed to survive in the seas. They, as all creatures, have special ecological roles in maintaining the balance. Even whale poop can help temper the damage that humans have done to the environment! Marine mammal excrements contain very important nutrients, such as nitrogen, that contribute to the growth of phytoplankton that many species of fish depend on for food. Aside from being a base of the marine food chain, phytoplankton plays an important part in terrestrial ecology as well because it is responsible for half of the world's oxygen supply. Through photosynthesis, it absorbs large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) -- about 10 gigatonnes of carbon from the atmosphere is taken each year by planktons. That's a lot better than any mitigation measure done by climate change authorities!

 

While there are many conservation efforts by different environmental organizations to save not only these species in the Arctic, let's say hypothetically that there are no other solutions but to mitigate and keep them in a controlled environment, do you honestly think that Manila Ocean Park could offer a good place for them? It's more logical to place them in a reputable rescue facility where they can be truly rehabilitated, rather than an entertainment-in-the-guise-of- a ”research” facility.

 

A TRUE RESCUE & CONSERVATION FACILITY would never take belugas too far away from their home, especially the tropics. At least it must be a sea pen near their habitat where the food, temperature, water quality, and their other needs would be easily maintained. And if RESCUING & REHABILITATING marine animals is really the mission of that facility, those animals should be released in the wild after rehabilitation to perform their ecological role in the ecosystem. One problem is, there are "Rescue & Conservation" facilities that intend to keep these creatures perpetually to exploit them for profit. In the guise of conservation and education, they use the animals in entertainment shows.

 

10. For wild animals be able to perform in entertainment shows, there are certain training processes to condition them to the new stuff in captivity. One is starving them to gain control over them and use food as their motivation to perform in front of the crowd.

I would not go further to the issue of CRUELTY in training cetaceans because it's another issue that is based on emotions and generally-accepted principles of animal welfare. But one question is this: Is there's really a need for them to be used in entertainment just to be “safe” in the enclosure's premises and to "educate" children?

 

Teaching them artificial behaviors such as those circus tricks you may have probably seen in dolphin shows would not rehabilitate them to thrive in the wild, but on the contrary, would make them dependent to human – begging food in exchange of performance, rather than hunting food using their innate skills to survive. That's why “rescued” cetaceans used in entertainment shows can hardly be released back in the wild.

 

11. With regards to the educational value, what could we possibly get in captive cetaceans? Their physical features, check! But their behavior, role in the ecosystem, and others? -? What you may see is a beluga whale with artificial behaviors in an artificial habitat. A beluga whale deprived of it's essence to be himself. What could you learn with things without essence?

 

If we are already contended with watching their physical features, might as well see them in pictures, instead. But if we want to learn more about them and how they really live, there are many literatures in the library, in the internet, or in documentaries in certain TV channels.

 

If Manila Ocean Park really wants to spread environmental awareness in the Philippines, it is best to focus on what we really need in our own context to save Philippine seas and aquatic resources.

 

*For further discussions, please visit and like BELUGAS WON'T HAVE FUN IN THE PHILIPPINES Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/BelugasHaveNoFuninPH#!/BelugasHaveNoFuninPH

 

Follow @NoFunPH4Belugas and contribute tweets with the hashtag: 

#BelugasWontHaveFunInThePhilippines

 

Please also sign our petition at

http://www.change.org/petitions/manila-ocean-park-don-t-bring-beluga-whales-to-the-philippines-return-them-to-the-arctic-sea

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Hawaii first state to ban plastic bags at checkout

Hawaii first state to ban plastic bags at checkout | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
By now, it’s hardly news when a city bans plastic bags at checkout counters -- but an entire state? That’s happened in Hawaii, where Honolulu County has joined the state’s three other counties to give Hawaii a first-in-the-nation title.

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The Pacific Ocean Is Dying

The Pacific Ocean Is Dying | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
Just prior to the Supermoon of March 18th, 2011, the world witnessed a natural and manmade disaster of epic proportions.

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Hammerhead Shark Protection in Costa Rica Involves Genetic Analysis

Hammerhead Shark Protection in Costa Rica Involves Genetic Analysis | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
In the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, hammerhead sharks spend their nights feeding on squid and their days healing their wounds near underwater aid stations where other fish symbiotically cleanse their injuries.

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Whatever happened to... #LeaveNothingButFootprints

#LeaveNothingButFootprints Support the FOOTPRINTS PROJECT!

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The Cove Redecorated: "Living Together With Dolphins" | Psychology Today

The Cove Redecorated: "Living Together With Dolphins" | Psychology Today | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
Taiji, the site of horrific dolphin slaughter, plans to open a marine park. By Marc Bekoff, Ph.D....

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Dolphins helping people

Dolphins helping people | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
A visitor might stumble upon a strange sight in Laguna, Brazil, if they went down to the shore. Here, the local fishermen rely on dolphins to help them with their yearly fish catch.

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Disturbing News From Under The Sea

Disturbing News From Under The Sea | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
This article comes to us courtesy of California Watch By Susanne Rust...

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More News on the Earth Day Coastal Clean-up at Freedom Island

BT: Freedom island, sama-samang nilinis ng iba't ibang environmental group

 

Sorry for posting this late. Just saw this on YouTube.  But it's worth posting no matter how late it is!  Go, Trixie and Gleissee!!!


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Mosquitoes Blamed For Captive Killer Whale Deaths

Mosquitoes Blamed For Captive Killer Whale Deaths | Makamundo (Earthly) | Scoop.it
In the open ocean, healthy killer whales live free of any natural predators -- but in captivity, even the smallest of insects pose a lethal threat to these majestic giants.
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