Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web
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The Rise Of Visual Social Media

The Rise Of Visual Social Media | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it

"Social media sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest have ushered in visual marketing as the breakout trend for 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Search engines now rank content based on social conversations and sharing, not just websites alone. Brands can use visual content on their social media to increase engagement and inspire sharing and viral marketing. The rise of platforms like Pinterest and Instagram, and Facebook's multimillion-dollar acquisition of the latter, shows how visual content is becoming an increasingly important force for communication online".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full Article Here: http://www.fastcompany.com/3000794/rise-visual-social-media


Via Antonino Militello, Antoine Calendrier
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YDeveloper's comment, August 30, 2012 5:59 AM
Rising of social media will take an interest to the next level. We don't know who wins.
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The Six Reasons Why Companies Actually Wind Up Embracing CSR - Forbes

The Six Reasons Why Companies Actually Wind Up Embracing CSR - Forbes | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
The Six Reasons Why Companies Actually Wind Up Embracing CSRForbesSo today I write what is called a “positive analysis” regarding why companies ultimately wind up embracing CSR.

Via Antoine Calendrier
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Five 2013 CSR Best Practices That Grew Profits

Five 2013 CSR Best Practices That Grew Profits | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Corporate social responsibility made the leap in 2013 from being a “do good” corporate responsibility to a best practice for growing profits.

Via MindShare HR
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

Five 2013 CSR Best Practices That Grew Profits

This article highlights the 5 best CSR practices that were able to grow profits in 2013. I really enjoyed this article, namely because it introduced some new ideas which hadn’t been touched upon in CSR Lecture or Seminar this year. Some highlights of the article which I truly enjoyed as new and interesting CSR practices include:

 

Today, the fast food industry is losing money because their unique selling point of selling quick, inexpensive food to customers no longer holds true. Their food is quickly escalating in price, making a cheap drive thru pit stop running customers the equivalent of stepping out to a restaurant. Also, it can no longer be denied that fast food is not a healthy meal option. With food chains such as Panera selling quick, healthy and cost effective meals, fast food chains are having to provide healthier alternatives than their typical burger and fries.

 

In 2013, Ford profiled their customers. What they discovered is that customers wanted to be able to trust the corporations they did business with. With a middle class that today must stretch their monthly budgets larger than ever before, customers also want a fair price on what they buy. Customers want it all. However, trust won out over having a cheaply priced item if they company selling the item did not seem authentic in any of their practices. Transparency seems to be key in wining over new customers when the price of the product is already successful.

 

Lastly, the last point that intrigued me in this article was how hiring women to assume leadership roles in a company has been shown to increase profits. I enjoyed this paragraph, because even in the twenty-first century, women do not garner the same respect in the workforce (especially in business) as their male counterparts do. Women still make less than men for the same job in industry. As a CSR practice to embrace in 2013 and onwards, including women in leadership roles was not something I would have considered. Following the Stakeholder Management Model, it makes sense, however. By including everyone in the decision making process at a company, more input can be made by all parties. New insights and ideas can lead to creativity and ideas that may never have been brought forward in the company.

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Does the Good Outweigh the Bad? Sizing up 'Selective' Corporate Social ... - Knowledge@Wharton

Does the Good Outweigh the Bad? Sizing up 'Selective' Corporate Social ... - Knowledge@Wharton | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Does the Good Outweigh the Bad? Sizing up 'Selective' Corporate Social ...

Via Zermatt Summit
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AS Micro - Government Intervention & Negative Externalities: Mexico enacts soda tax in effort to combat world's highest obesity rate

AS Micro - Government Intervention & Negative Externalities: Mexico enacts soda tax in effort to combat world's highest obesity rate | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Health officials in the United States look to Mexico's new law as an experiment in curbing sugar consumption

Via Saint Martin's - Economics
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

Mexico enacts soda tax in effort to combat world's highest obesity rate


 I found this article very engaging, and the simple solution sought by politicians seems to make sense—at least on paper. Mexico, a country with the highest obesity rate (33.8%) has enacted a sales tax on sweetened soft drinks in an effort to slow down this rising rate. Not only is obesity a growing concern, the number of cases of diabetes in the country has doubled.  Consuming over a litre of soda a day, the new 10% tax was instigated in a hope of slowing down the guzzling consumers. This tax will hopefully help prevent over 630,000 new cases of diabetes from developing by 2030.

 

 Money collected from the tax will be used in the school system to help the schools purchase water, as well as make cleaner and safer dirking water to rural regions of the country. However, many believe this tax will do little more than anger consumers and soda producers.

 

  Already, there have been grumblings from the major soda producers. They state that countless businesses will be affected and many (at corner stores and bottling facilities) will lose their jobs. However, what is the correct answer? With such a rising pandemic reaching across Mexico, I believe that if a small tax of 10% forces consumers to think twice before purchasing a sugary drink, then there is some merit. 

 

The negative externalities that will be caused as a result of this tax seem inferior to the greater issue that it should help solve. Will this tax be sustainable, however? The soda producers are upset, and will no doubt devise a plan to regain their lost sales. Will public outcry topple the soda tax, or will they embrace the new change as a step towards healthier choices in their diets? As a new tax enacted in January 2014, it will be interesting to see what the year holds in Mexico and if other countries (especially low income States in the US) follow the trend set forth by Mexican politicians.

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How ethical are our food companies?

How ethical are our food companies? | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Love that chocolate Haagen-Dazs ice-cream? But what about the way its makers treat their farmers? How about KitKat and the way its production impacts the environment?

Via Acquisti & Sostenibilità not-for-profit
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

How Ethical Are Our Food Companies?

 

Using a “naming and shaming” campaign, Oxfam asked consumers to ask their favourite food producers to change the way in which they did business. Asking the companies to be more sustainable and focusing on issues such as workers’ rights and climate change. Using social media and posters to spread their questions and demands, over 400,000 people reacted.

 

After a year, Oxfam analyzed the changes made by the top food producers. Nine of the ten improved their company in some respect based on the demands addressed by consumers. General-Mills was one of the only companies to see their score drop.  According to Oxfam, “Nestle, Unilever and Coca-Cola have joined a race to the top on policies that help address issues like hunger, poverty, women's rights, land grabs and climate change in their supply chains.”

 

However, companies such as General-Mills blamed the campaign, citing that they already had CSR practices in place and that results did not accurately convey the policies they were trying to achieve.

 

Which begs the question—do these large corporations care about sustainability, philanthropy and the stakeholder model in their management? Or, do they develop a CSR policy to appease social change groups such as Oxfam when they come knocking on their door?  According to General Mills, “We regularly report our progress in our annual Global Responsibility Report. Our report tends not to mirror the Oxfam scorecard, and because the scorecard is based only on publicly available information, that may be a key factor in their ranking.”

 

In my opinion, a key word that is shown in the statement from General Mills is the word “publicly.” Corporations still conduct business in a veil of secrecy—they do not reveal all to their customers. While I don’t believe complete transparency is required (the innate details of their products formulations and how much they spend on office chairs), there are some common sense topics that would build consumer confidence and trust in a corporation if they were to reveal the information publicly.

 

Allowing customers to know where their source their labour and ingredients into heir supply chain would be a good step in that direction. Allowing their CSR policies to be updated and to show the consumer what steps are being undertaken to meet their policy objectives. Like with anything, it is very easy create a policy—the follow through is what is important. Customers are happy when they can place trust in the brands they buy for their family. Making public CSR policies available to their customers and showing how they will uphold these is a great step in the right direction.

 

 

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Vietnamese farmer makes pesticide from herbs

Vietnamese farmer makes pesticide from herbs | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
A farmer in Hung Yen province has successfully created the pesticide which can kill insects but stays friendly to the environment and humans.

Via Cathryn Wellner
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

Vietnamese farmer makes pesticide from herbs

 

   This article, gathered from an Eco Business webpage, describes how a Vietnamese farmer has designed a pesticide that not only protects his plants and crops from bugs, it is safe for humans to use (and even to consume!) Discovered by accident on his property, the farmer (who has an interest in natural herbs to cure common ailments in the human body), says that by mixing a concoction of herbs, alcohol and eventually adding water, the pesticide provides a safe means of combating insects, while not harming other species of animals in the process.

 

  This “miracle” herbicide will approved by the governing Agriculture body in Vietnam. If it proves successful, he will have the right to patent his pesticide. When reading about such discoveries, it is always shocking how something can be so simply made by an individual and could have such tremendous results.

 

  On the notion of sustainability, much of the destruction that has taken place in the environment has been because of toxic and damaging chemicals used by humans. In the last ten years, there has been a tremendous trend to embrace “green” and “eco” products in order to clean our homes and care for our families. While large producers of crops have not adopted such practices, could this new pesticide be a step in the right direction? Being sustainable and eco friendly does not mean one does not achieve profits.

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Rescooped by Madeleine Wilson from How Social Media Impacts Business...
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Fast-Food Restaurants’ Social-Media Power, in Infographic Form

Fast-Food Restaurants’ Social-Media Power, in Infographic Form | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Secrets of fast food, revealed....

Via Ron Cassan
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Melissa Waggener Zorkin: How To Change The World Before Breakfast

Melissa Waggener Zorkin: How To Change The World Before Breakfast | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Why Generation 'Connected' values innovation, and how that affects their purchasing behavior.

Via Jurjen Söhne, Antoine Calendrier
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India: The last "Fast Food Nation". Why take so long ? - CNN (blog)

India: The last "Fast Food Nation". Why take so long ? - CNN (blog) | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
India: The last "Fast Food Nation". Why take so long ?CNN (blog)That's not what Indians need right now!

Via g-sharon
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

India: The Next “Fast Food Nation?”

What I really enjoyed about this article was its exploration of India as an emerging market and global player when it comes to something we in North America never seem to think twice about: our abundance of fast food restaurants, and numerous options. In India, with a burgeoning middle class and the average age of its citizens at 30, it is no surprise that fast food franchises have exploded.  Quick Service Restaurants (QSRs) are abundant and very popular. What was surprising to find in this article was that it was not only Western fast food chains that have found success in India, but traditional Indian restaurants, too.

 

There is something for everyone, as it seems from the article. Traditional Indian restaurants that have now started to play the franchising game, and have opened restaurants in numerous cities. Not only are the chains that are unknown to the West spreading across India, Western chains are beginning to infiltrate second and third tier cities. They have become too well known in the major centres of India and have now had to infiltrate further—there is a place for them, and a demand by consumers.

 

What I also found very interesting is the way in which Western food franchises tweak their menus in order to respond appropriately to the tastes and cultural practices of India. As the cow is Holy in India, McDonald’s would never serve their flagship Big Mac to customers. They would not respond well. Domino’s does not put meat on its pizzas; instead it flavours them with vegetables and traditional Indian spices.  And it appears to be working—last year Jubilant Foodworks, who owns the rights to Dunkin Donuts and Domino’s sold $150 million dollars worth of pizzas last year. That is almost the same revenue achieved in America.

 

The fast food explosion that has hit India has allowed its customers to have many options when it comes to dining out. With the mix and clash of traditional India food, a consumer can enjoy a rajasthani meal, followed by a McFlurry across the street for dessert. It has also demonstrated the globalized economy which everything now takes place within. Not only are Western franchises infiltrating into India markets, there may soon be an interest in exporting India cuisine and brands into neighbouring Western markets.  A veggie Big Mac eaten in NYC, topped with curry and spices? Why not? In the globalized economy and markets of today—it is definitely a possibility.

 

 

 

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Ranking The World's Most Sustainable Companies - Forbes

Ranking The World's Most Sustainable Companies - Forbes | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Novo Nordisk is the most sustainable company on earth this year, according to a new ranking.

Via Drake Manning
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30 Of The Most Powerful Images Ever

30 Of The Most Powerful Images Ever | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
A picture is worth a thousand words, but not all pictures are created equal. The pictures we usually feature on Bored Panda can be cute, beautiful, funny, or enchanting, but these pictures are powerful. They are gripping and unforgettable because of the volumes they speak about the human ...

Via Alessandro Rea
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

30 Of the Most Powerful Images Ever

 

While it is true that a picture is worth a 1000 words, there are times when they may leave us speechless. Such is the case with the images in this article. Collected from the past century—namely the last 50 years, they cover a broad range of topics including war, famine, religious persecution, activism, love and even friendship.

 

When I “Scooped” these articles, I wasn’t sure how they pertained to CSR or anything we had covered in class so far. Of the 30 beautiful images, I decided to pick one that I thought could be better explored in the realm of topics we had discussed in class. I settled on the image of the “Embracing Couple in the Rubble of a Collapsed Factory.”

I chose this image because of the documentaries we have watched in class so far, including The Corporation. One of the many negative externalities associated with large corporations is their outsourcing policies. The demand for cheap clothing (or material goods) is ever growing. Consumers demand it, and so do Corporations. To be able to made cheaply overseas, and then shipped to North America for the fine detailing is a common occurrence.

 

I say fabric, because it appears there is a lot of clothing scraps surrounding the couple. Through the dust and debris they appear to be south East Asian or Middle Eastern. Perhaps from Bangladesh or a part of India?

 

Overworked and underpaid, the working conditions in these factories are atrocious. Rented or leased, they are rarely inspected and hazardous working conditions occur. While Nike is generally the metaphorical punching bag for using sweatshop workers, all large corporations employ some type of system overseas. They are all as equally guilty.

 

There is an argument in favour of such establishments. Corporations will come in and set up shop when the labour is cheap. This can often establish a small economic turn in the city or village. It provides a place to work, and though marginal, some sort of wage. When workers and activists put pressure on the factories and corporations to pay their employees more, the factory will close up shop and move to another impoverished area. They will begin the cycle again.

 

So where does this leave our couple—killed in a building collapsed during their shift? Unfortunately, there are many questions to be raised when it comes to sweatshops. Educating consumers as to where the clothing they buy comes from is a step in the right direction. Realizing the negative externalities which are created when buying a cheap sweater, and not being afraid to ask questions when tragedies (such as a collapse) do occur.

               

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Walmart puts product suppliers on notice about chemicals

Walmart puts product suppliers on notice about chemicals | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Walmart's phaseout of toxic chemicals reached a milestone today.

Via Acquisti & Sostenibilità not-for-profit
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

Wal Mart Puts Product Suppliers on Notice about Chemicals:


As a major retailer with countless stores, Wal Mart as a corporation has enormous power. When it comes to dealing with its suppliers, Wal Mart not so much needs to ask—it can very well just tell. Such is the case with a new initiative undertaken by the mega retailer in February 2014. As the most ambitious of its kind, Wal Mart will be asking its product makers to reveal and phase out a list of toxic chemicals which can be found in their products. After several years developing the policy, it was implemented mid February.

 

While the policy is only currently enacted in the United States, as we have studied in CSR, I don’t believe it will be long before it travels across borders to Wal Mart’s located in Canada. While they are not asking suppliers to eliminate all chemicals, Wal Mart has zeroed in, and created a list of “priority chemicals” that must be disclosed and removed. These included: carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern.

 

What I enjoyed about this is the concern for both human and environment were present in the reasoning for the disclosure of chemicals.  However, the need to protect a product’s make up is still of importance. Using a third party disclosure procedure, the actual formulations present in the products’ will not need to be disclosed (at the risk of them being copied).

 

While Wal Mart insists it will collaborate with its suppliers, I believe this is a great step in the next direction. While it is not trying to change and be the next Whole Foods or your local Farmer’s Market, it is a big change when the mega retailer synonymous with “everyday low prices” speaks and wants a change. Wal Mart is smart—they know how to listen to what their consumers want.  While in today’s economy, no one should be forced to choose between a safety and low costs, the reality is that it is often the case. With this new mandate imposed by a retailer known for offering the lowest costs to consumers, could this prove a step in the right direction?

 

Companies will be encouraged to hit goals and limit the toxic priority chemicals. With the emphasis on providing safe products for consumers, competition amongst companies such as P&G and Unilever might create the right momentum to encourage other large suppliers to create positive changes in the formulations of their products in the future.

 

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World Bank Takes Food Waste Seriously, Estimating Third Of Production Is Wasted - International Business Times

World Bank Takes Food Waste Seriously, Estimating Third Of Production Is Wasted - International Business Times | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
International Business Times World Bank Takes Food Waste Seriously, Estimating Third Of Production Is Wasted International Business Times The developed world wastes more food than developing countries, though together the world wastes 11 billion...

Via Monica S Mcfeeters, SustainOurEarth
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

World Bank Takes Food Waste Seriously, Estimating Third Of Production Is Wasted

Anywhere from one quarter to a third of the world wastes food. What a shocking statistic considering the amount of starving citizens on our planet today. What also shocked me in this article was the infographic located at the bottom. While most of the food is wasted in the developed world (56%), 44% is wasted by developing nations. While food is wasted mostly by consumers in the developed world, a lot of good is lost in transportation where the proper technology is not available to keep it fresh and safe for consumption.

 

While food prices dropped across the board by 11% due to a bumper crop of corn and soybeans, there is still much work that must be done. There appears to be a lack of knowledge on the intensity of such a problem that exists in our world. However, it is difficult for changes to be made if they are not demanded.

 

Food donations to developing nations must be made easier for organizations. The technology to transport food large distances is available, but it is expensive. More strides must be made to ensure that those who face a lack of food security do not find themselves in a situation where spoilt food (because of lack of refrigeration, for example) goes to waste.

 

Latin America wastes the least amount of food—only 15% from its annual production according to the World Food Bank. What can we learn from this area of the world? Interestingly enough, Latin America was also an area of the world that proved that in order to lead a meaningful, happy life; one did not need to be filled with materialistic items.

 

Building on the idea of corporate philanthropy, with so much food being wasted (either by consumers, businesses, or lost in transportation), is there something that could be done by corporations to stop this trend? Food donations to developing worlds need to be better mandated and be simpler for all who wish to donate. Any large food producer could easily enact a large food donation as part of their CSR policy.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 4, 2014 5:19 PM

This is something we need to correct and fast.

Rescooped by Madeleine Wilson from Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability
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Burton Snowboards & Mountain Dew Announce New Sustainability Partnership and Launch T-Shirts Made from Recycled Bottles

Burton Snowboards & Mountain Dew Announce New Sustainability Partnership and Launch T-Shirts Made from Recycled Bottles | Corporate Social Responsibility- Issues and Articles Around the Web | Scoop.it
Burton Snowboards and Mountain Dew today announced a new partnership focused on improving sustainability in apparel and outerwear.

Via Drake Manning
Madeleine Wilson's insight:

Burton Snowboards & Mountain Dew Announce New Sustainability Partnership and Launch T-Shirts Made from Recycled Bottles

 

   I discovered this article after we had watched the Dragon’s Den episode dealing with the lifestyle clothing company 10Trees. With the negativity of each seminar, it was uplifting to see that it is possible to make a profit and be a viable business—while still upholding your own values when it comes to sustainability.

 

  Snowboarding and outdoor apparel manufacturer Burton has teamed up with Mountain Dew to launch a new line of t-shirts. Made from 50% recycled bottle caps and 50% organic cotton. Available in 3 different styles, they are part of a new line of shirts from Burton’s Green Mountain project (their eco clothing line). These shirts were only the beginning for Burton and Mountain Dew partnering together. An outerwear line was also created and distributed to Burton retailers across the country.

 

 As a brand that is widely recognized and worn by a younger generation, I think this is a great measure undertaken by Burton. While you wouldn’t know by looking at the shirts that they were made with recycled bottle caps, the illustrations are definitely pretty creative. One shirt depicts a funky machine—spitting out pieces to make up the shirt from bottles going in.                     

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