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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | APHUG | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


Via Seth Dixon
Abigail Mack's insight:

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2014 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:45 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 

 

Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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Rescooped by Abigail Mack from Chinese Cyber Code Conflict
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People's Republic of China And The Biggest Territory Grab Since World War II

People's Republic of China And The Biggest Territory Grab Since World War II | APHUG | Scoop.it
Beijing’s new South China Sea map makes a stunning claim to islands and seas.

Via Red-DragonRising
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Rescooped by Abigail Mack from Geography resources for South African teachers
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▶ Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

Published on Aug 4, 2014

Planet Earth is this solid thing you are standing on right now. In your everyday life you don't really waste a thought about how amazing this is. A giant, ancient, hot rock. How did it come into existence and how big is it really? You will be surprised. The ground you are standing on is just a very, very small part of the big picture.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Abigail Mack from IB Geography @NIST
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Beyond the border: the US's deadly immigration crisis

Beyond the border: the US's deadly immigration crisis | APHUG | Scoop.it
Texas has become the deadliest state in the US for undocumented immigrants. This four-part series from the Guardian and The Texas Observer looks at the lives affected by the humanitarian crisis

Via Andy Dorn
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Britain's food self-sufficiency is in long-term decline, warn farmers

Britain's food self-sufficiency is in long-term decline, warn farmers | APHUG | Scoop.it
NFU says year's food supply 'would run out today without imports', with homegrown food making up only 60% of total

Via Andy Dorn
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Changing Geography of the Dead Sea - Geolounge

Changing Geography of the Dead Sea - Geolounge | APHUG | Scoop.it
We’ve all seen the pictures- tourists floating in a picturesque lake surrounded by a mountainous desert environment, calmly reading flipping the pages of a newspaper with no fear of sinking. What is this strange phenomenon?
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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | APHUG | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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How To Cross 5 International Borders In 1 Minute Without Sweating

How To Cross 5 International Borders In 1 Minute Without Sweating | APHUG | Scoop.it
Nations need borders for security, for revenue, for defense, for identity. But for fun? Introducing borders that giggle.

Via Mr. David Burton
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8 Places You Should Visit Before They Vanish - Interesting Engineering

8 Places You Should Visit Before They Vanish - Interesting Engineering | APHUG | Scoop.it
Due to global warming, destruction of ecosystems and the rising sea level, we present a list of 8 places you should visit before they disappear off the map.

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When land is degraded, its people and their prospects are degraded too

When land is degraded, its people and their prospects are degraded too | APHUG | Scoop.it
Monique Barbut: Investing in sustainable land management could help boost political, economic and climatic resilience in poor countries

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | APHUG | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


Via Seth Dixon
Abigail Mack's insight:

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2014 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:45 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 

 

Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.