Mac Tech Support
Follow
Find
36.5K views | +31 today
 
Scooped by David Anders
onto Mac Tech Support
Scoop.it!

How to manage passwords with Keychain Access | Macworld

How to manage passwords with Keychain Access | Macworld | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Curious to know how you can better manage your passwords? Chris Breen provides tips and tricks for getting the most from OS X's Keychain Access.

  In what may seem like a step backward, we now juggle dozens of passwords. We have passwords for logging on to our Macs, accessing our iOS devices, checking our email, receiving instant messages and texts, purchasing real and virtual goods, yacking on social networking services, streaming music and movies—the list goes on and on.

  Fortunately, we no longer need to scribble down each and every password on a hunk of binder paper that we tape to our desks in plain sight. Our Macs can store these passwords and, in many cases, automatically fill them in when needed. But there’s more to know about passwords and the Mac's ability to store them than the simple fact that they exist. Here's a quick guide to what you can—and can’t—do with OS X’s passwords.

 

Keychains are key

  Ever since Mac OS 8.6, the Mac has managed passwords with Keychain, Apple’s password-management system. The Keychain Access application (/Applications/Utilities) is a front-end to that system. It stores a wide variety of items—including passwords for email, websites, servers, network shares, Wi-Fi networks, and encrypted disk images. Additionally, it can store secure notes, private keys, and certificates. Whenever you save a password—whether you're prompted by an application or you're saving a website’s password—it’s stored in the Mac’s keychain.

  The Mac places keychain files in multiple locations—/System/Library/Keychains, /Library/Keychains, and youruserfolder/Library/Keychains. Thankfully, the contents of these various keychain files are combined into Keychain Access, so that you needn't worry about where they're held.

  Launch Keychain Access, and you’ll see that the window is divided into three panes. The top-left pane lists keychains accessible to you. Below this is the Category pane. Here you can choose to view specific kinds of things stored in the keychain—passwords, secure notes, certificates associated with your account, encryption keys, and certificates used broadly by your Mac. The largest pane, to the right, displays the contents of selected category items—for example, all of the items that have a password associated with them. Except in the case of certificates, you can double-click on one of these items to open a window where you can view the item’s attributes—name, kind, associated account, location (a website or network address)—as well as its access control (meaning the applications and services allowed to access the item).

 

Recover passwords

  Keychain Access can do several useful things. For example, if you’ve forgotten a password and would like to recover it, Keychain Access is the place to go. To learn the identity of a password, select All Items or Passwords in the Category pane, then find the the item you want the password for and double-click it.

  Double-click a keychain item to locate the Show Password option.In the resulting window, enable the Show Password option. You’ll be prompted for the password for the login keychain. Enter that and click Allow, and the password will be revealed in the Password field.

  If you seek only to recover saved website passwords and are running Safari under Mountain Lion, your task is easier. Launch Safari, open Safari’s preferences, and click the Passwords tab. All the websites for which you’ve saved passwords in Safari will appear in a list. Enable the Show Passwords option and enter your login password when prompted. Passwords will be listed to the right of each site.

  You can also remove website passwords here. Just select the site you want to delete and click the Remove button. Or, to remove all remembered passwords, click Remove All.

 

Change the login keychain’s password

  When you first set up a user account, the login password used for that account is additionally assigned to the login keychain, where new passwords are stored by default. So you can simply enter the password you use with your account to uncover a keychain item's secrets.

  If there’s a flaw in the Keychain Access security setup, this is it. If someone knows your account’s password, they can access the items in this keychain and then discover your other passwords. If you’re concerned about that, you can easily change the password for the Login keychain.

  In Keychain Access select the login keychain and choose Edit > Change Password For Keychain "login". You’ll be prompted to enter your current password (the one you now use for your user account) and then enter and verify a new password. Do this, log out of your account and then back in; when the Mac needs to use one of the passwords stored in the login keychain, you’ll be prompted to enter it. As long as you’re logged in, you shouldn’t be troubled for that password again.

 

Auto-lock the keychain

  By default, once you’ve logged in, your keychain will be unlocked, which isn’t terribly secure if others can access your Mac when you’re not around. You can add a level of security that auto-locks your keychain. To do that, launch Keychain Access, select your login keychain, and choose Edit > Change Settings for Keychain “login”.

  The sheet that appears shows two options: 'Lock After X Minutes of Inactivity' and 'Lock When Sleeping'. If you choose the first option and configure it to read something like 5 minutes, your keychain will lock if it hasn’t been accessed in the last five minutes. If an application needs access to your keychain after that limit has expired, you’ll be prompted for your login keychain password. Additionally, enable the Lock When Sleeping option, and your keychain locks when your Mac goes to sleep (when you close your MacBook’s lid, for example). Click Save to implement the selected options.

 

If you forget

  You’ve changed the login keychain’s password and, regrettably, forgotten the new password. Is there any hope? Regrettably, no. Apple uses the Triple Digital Encryption Security standard (3DES) to secure the keychain. While not the most modern encryption scheme, it’s quite secure for everyday users—in this case, you. Unless you can recall your password, you’re out of luck and must start over. To begin that process, we’ll make a copy of the old keychain for safekeeping, in case you remember its password; we'll remove it from Keychain Access; and then we'll create a new login keychain that you’ll use in the future.

To do that, move to the Finder, select Go > Go to Folder, and enter ~/Library/Keychains. A Keychains folder containing your personal keychains will open. Locate the login.keychain file and drag it to a safe place on your Mac (the Documents folder, for example).

  Now launch Keychain Access and select the login item that appears in the Keychains pane. It should appear as an empty box, indicating that it’s missing from the Keychains folder. Choose File > Delete Keychain “login". In the sheet that appears, click Delete References.

  Deleting a keychain.Now choose File > New Keychain. In the resulting Save dialog box, name the new keychain login and save it to the default location (which is your account’s Keychains folder). You’ll be prompted to create and verify a password for this keychain. (Be sure to choose a password that you’ll remember this time.) From this point forward, passwords that you add will appear in this keychain. And, yes, you’ll have to reenter any passwords stored in the old keychain when prompted.

 Should the day come when your old password suddenly dawns on you, do this: In the Finder, open that Keychains folder and remove the current login.keychain file and put it in a safe place. Locate the old keychain whose password you’d forgotten and place it in this folder. Log out of your account and then back into it. In all likelihood you’ll be prompted for the password for your keychain by some startup item. When you are, enter the password and the keychain will be unlocked.

 

Share your login keychain

If you have multiple Macs, each one has its own login keychain with its own set of passwords. Wouldn’t it be great if each Mac had access to the same keychain? They can. Like so:

Make a copy of the login.keychain file inside the Keychains folder on the Mac that has the most complete set of passwords, and copy it to your other Macs. Remove the login.keychain file from each Mac’s Keychains folders and put it in a safe place in case something goes wrong. Place the copied login keychain file within the user’s Keychains folder. Log out and log back in. If your login password on the Mac you’re currently using is different than the one on this master Mac, you’ll be prompted for the login keychain’s password. Once you enter it, you should have access to the same passwords as that master Mac.

more...
No comment yet.
Mac Tech Support
Help for Apple Mac, iPhone, and iPad Problems
Curated by David Anders
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

How to cull your iPhoto library of duplicates and bad photos

How to cull your iPhoto library of duplicates and bad photos | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Many of us have huge iPhoto libraries packed with duplicates and poor images. Follow these steps to weed the keepers from the clunkers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

The Software and Services Apple Needs to Fix

The Software and Services Apple Needs to Fix | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

Marco Arment's excellent post on Apple's current state of development has this pithy sentence:
…the software quality has fallen so much in the last few years that I’m
deeply concerned for its future.
Apple has huge cash reserves, is massively profitable, and none of that
seems likely to falter, nor is that by any means what Marco meant. None of us think Apple will go out of business. Rather, that we will lose the
reasons we have selected using Apple's products over those of other

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

9 password manager recommendations for OS X and iOS

9 password manager recommendations for OS X and iOS | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Following today's release of the top 25 worst passwords used in 2014, if the passwords you use are among them, or if you are using your same password over and over for your various online services,...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Unlocking Disk Utility’s hidden secrets

Unlocking Disk Utility’s hidden secrets | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Disk Utility has a lot of talents, some less well known than others. Topher Kessler explores some of its more esoteric (though useful) features.


To enable this feature you must expose Disk Utility’s Debug menu, which Apple uses for testing the app’s features during development. Here’s how:

1. Quit Disk Utility

2. Open the Terminal utility

3. Run the following Command:

defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1

4. Relaunch Disk Utility

With this menu enabled, choose the Show every partition command near the bottom and any hidden partitions will appear. You’ll see, for example, an EFI partition appear on bootable drives and a Recovery HD partition for those drives that hold one.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Samsung T1 is a tiny 1TB SSD that's blazing fast, but pricey $600 [REVIEW]

Samsung T1 is a tiny 1TB SSD that's blazing fast, but pricey $600 [REVIEW] | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
The Samsung T1 portable SSD is a tiny, attractive storage drive that packs serious speed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Sleep and power settings possibly behind Wi-Fi dropouts in Yosemite

Sleep and power settings possibly behind Wi-Fi dropouts in Yosemite | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Along with its perks and new features, OS X Yosemite has not been without its share of problems, with at least some of these being associated with the inability to keep your Mac connected to Wi-Fi....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Fix Adobe Flash update installers not opening

Fix Adobe Flash update installers not opening | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
In the past few days, Apple issued an update to its XProtect anti-malware system in OS X, part of which blocks versions of Adobe's Flash Player internet plug-in for security purposes. If you need f...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

My email software isn't accepting my Gmail username and password - Gmail Help

If you're repeatedly prompted for your username and password, or if you're getting an 'invalid credentials' or 'web login required' error, make sure your password is correct.

Your mail app might not support the latest security standards. Learn how to allow less secure apps access to your account.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

OWC In-Line Digital Thermal Sensor Solves iMac Hard Drive Compatibility Issue | Blog

OWC In-Line Digital Thermal Sensor Solves iMac Hard Drive Compatibility Issue | Blog | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

Beginning with the Late-2009 model, upgrading the hard drive in your iMac was no longer as simple as installing the new drive of your choosing. 

As we reported on the Rocket Yard, Apple changed the game when it came to hard drive upgrades. In Late 2009 and 2010 models, Apple introduced a different cable for each brand drive that forced users to install the same hard drive brand in order to upgrade.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Hands On: Big Mean Folder Machine 2 (OS X) | MacNN $15

Hands On: Big Mean Folder Machine 2 (OS X) | MacNN  $15 | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

So at tax time, or year's end, let it gather up all your work documents and arrange the lot by month. If you're archiving to physical media like DVD, tell BMFM to divide all your photographs by month, and then make folders that are the right size to go on that shiny disc. Or go the other wa, and tell BMFM to create one single folder containing every audio track you created since you got your Mac.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

GMail starts to block less secure apps: how to enable access again - gHacks Tech News

GMail starts to block less secure apps: how to enable access again - gHacks Tech News | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
If you are receiving error messages while trying to sign-in to Gmail, a recent security switch by Google may be the reason. Find out how to resolve it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

OSX Lion Adds CoreStorage, a Volume Manager

OSX Lion Adds CoreStorage, a Volume Manager | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

Introducing CoreStorage

All this has changed in Mac OS X 10.7 (“Lion”), however. Although Mac OS never did get ZFS, as was planned in 10.5, the storage enhancements found in 10.7 are getting awfully close in terms of features. Along with integrated file versions and full disk encryption comes a new technology called CoreStorage, including a full logical volume manager.

David Anders's insight:

CoreStorage can break Snow Leopard boot drives when Mavericks or Yosemite changes hard drive configuration.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Easily send large e-mail attachments with iCloud in Yosemite

Easily send large e-mail attachments with iCloud in Yosemite | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Sending attachments via e-mail to a colleague or friend is perhaps the most common approach for sharing files, and is a method that is nearly as old as e-mail itself; however, one limitation that m...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Resolve iOS update and restore errors - Apple Support

Resolve iOS update and restore errors - Apple Support | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
When you're updating or restoring your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch in iTunes, you might see this message: "The iPhone [device name] could not be restored. An unknown error occurred [error number]."

Here's how to resolve specific iOS update and restore errors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Sleep and power settings possibly behind Wi-Fi dropouts in Yosemite

Sleep and power settings possibly behind Wi-Fi dropouts in Yosemite | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Along with its perks and new features, OS X Yosemite has not been without its share of problems, with at least some of these being associated with the inability to keep your Mac connected to Wi-Fi....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

LastPass introduces native password manager for Mac | MacNN

LastPass introduces native password manager for Mac | MacNN | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

Password management service LastPass has announced a dedicated Mac client. The software saves logins, credit cards, and other data, and has several unique features as a local app. One of these is Quick Search, which speeds up finding logins and any associated notes. Users can also point their default web browser to a site automatically via a keyboard shortcut; LastPass will automatically fill in login fields.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

OSX 10.10 Yosemite: iCloud Drive explained The Ars Technica Review

OSX 10.10 Yosemite: iCloud Drive explained The Ars Technica Review | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

More weirdness lurks. At the top level of iCloud Drive, badged folders appear for each iCloud-enabled application. You can’t Get Info on these folders either; the Finder just beeps in protest.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

How to Set Up Apple’s Family Sharing

How to Set Up Apple’s Family Sharing | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
  • One credit card. Up to six of you can buy books, movies, apps, and music on your master credit card. When your kids try to buy stuff, a permission request pops up on your iPad, iPhone, or Mac. You have to approve each purchase.

  • Younger Appleheads. Within Family Sharing, you can now create Apple accounts for tiny tots; 13 is no longer the age minimum.
  • Shared everything. All of you get instant access to one another’s music, video, iBooks, and app purchases — without having to know one another’s Apple passwords.
  • Find one another. You can use your iPad to see where your kids are, and vice versa (with permission, of course).
  • Mutual photo album, calendar, and reminders. When you turn on Family Sharing, your Photos, Calendar, and Reminders apps each sprout a new category that’s preconfigured to permit access by everyone in your family.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

The Best Portable Hard Drive | Wirecutter

The Best Portable Hard Drive | Wirecutter | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

After 30 hours of research and nearly 40 hours of testing, we determined that the 2TB Seagate Backup Plus Slim is our new favorite portable hard drive. 

The 2TB Seagate Backup Plus Slim is the best portable hard drive for most people because it’s reliable and sturdily built. It’s also more compact, lighter, and faster than our previous recommendation, the WD My Passport Ultra.  January 8, 2015

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Making more of Migration Assistant

Making more of Migration Assistant | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Perhaps it's been ages since you've used Migration Assistant to move data from one Mac to another. Or maybe it's new to you. Either way, Chris Breen offers helpful tips for its use.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Comcast Disable Home Hotspot

Comcast Disable Home Hotspot | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

I hope to save others some time by providing the steps I discovered for disabling the Wi-Fi 'hotspot' from a Comcast / Xfinity account. The following steps are from the Comcast / Xfinity site:

Introduction:
We encourage you to keep your XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot feature enabled as it allows more people to enjoy the benefits of XFINITY WiFi and you will no longer need to provide your private XFINITY WiFi home network password to guests.


This Wi-Fi signal is completely separate from your secure XFINITY WiFi home network and won't slow down your home broadband connection.
Enable or Disable XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot Feature via My Account:
1. Navigate to the 'Users & Preferences' section of 'My Account'.
2. Under Service Address, click the 'Manage XFINITY WiFi' link.
3. A new window appears indicating, "When XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot is enabled, your XFINITY Wireless Gateway will broadcast a second signal, 'xfinitywifi,' providing a separate network for your guests while keeping your private XFINITY WiFi network secure - at no additional charge."
4. Under the Manage XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot option, if your wireless gateway is enabled with the Home Hotspot feature, the Enable XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot radio button will be selected. If your Home Hotspot feature is disabled, the Disable XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot radio button will be selected.
5. To enable or disable the feature, choose the Enable XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot radio button or the Disable XFINITY WiFi Home Hotspot radio button.

?
6. Click Save.
7. You will be presented with a confirmation message at the top of the Users & Preferences page.
Disabling the feature takes effect within a few minutes.
However, enabling the device will take up to 24 hours if you live in a region that has been enabled for the feature.
8. If you are presented with information about XFINITY WiFi but do not see the Home Hotspot radio buttons, you have a device that has not yet been enabled for the feature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Macs - Apple Support

EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Macs - Apple Support | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
This article lists firmware updates that were released for Intel-based Macs. They update the firmware that originally shipped from the factory. If your computer isn't on this list, then you don't need an update to the factory firmware.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

How to record video from your iPhone onto your Mac

How to record video from your iPhone onto your Mac | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Want to create an iPhone or iPad tutorial for someone, record a game level walk through or something else? It's easier than you think if you have OS X Yosemite installed — you don't need any third-party apps installed. Here's how. The secret is the QuickTime Player application in your Mac's Applications folder. QuickTime Player doesn't just play videos — it also records video and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Anders
Scoop.it!

Less Secure Apps - Google Account Settings Disable | Enable

Choosing "Disable" can prevent OSX Mail, Thunderbird, Outlook from working with Gmail Account.

more...