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How to restore your data from the cloud | Macworld

How to restore your data from the cloud | Macworld | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Online backups are an important part of a well-balanced backup strategy. But after disaster strikes, how exactly do you restore all that data you lost?

  Online backups are a useful component of a well-balanced backup strategy. Whether you rely primarily on cloud storage for backups (see “Backup Basics”) or use the cloud to supplement local backups such as bootable duplicates (see “Bulletproof Backups”), it’s crucial to understand how you will go about restoring your data after disaster strikes.

  Disaster is the operative word here. If you merely need to restore a few individual files or folders, usually that’s simple enough—typically you use either the backup client software installed on your Mac or the backup provider’s website to specify which versions of which files you want, click a button or two, and wait for the files to download. No big deal.

  But what if your entire hard disk dies and needs replacing, or your Mac is stolen and you have to start over with a new one? Such situations require a different strategy, because your online backups almost certainly don’t include every single file on your Mac; and in any case, even with a fast broadband connection, you may be looking at days or weeks to restore whatever data you keep in the cloud.

 One way or another, you must first get your Mac back to a state of basic functionality, and then—perhaps by stages—restore your crucial missing files from the cloud. How you go about that depends on what other backups (if any) you have available.

 

If you have no other backups

  Let’s start with the least pleasant scenario: Your only backups are in the cloud, and you have no local copies of your data at all. You have to do more work and wait longer to get up and running; but if you backed up all your crucial files, you will return to a happy place in due time.

  Set up OS X: Your first step is to make sure that your drive has OS X installed. New Macs, of course, come with OS X already installed. If you’ve had to replace a defective drive with a new, empty drive, you’ll need to install OS X on it before doing anything else.

 If your Mac shipped with an older version of OS X that included physical installation media (a DVD, CD, or flash drive)—or if you planned ahead and made yourself a recovery volume using the OS X Recovery Disk Assistant—then just start from that media and run the installer. Newer Macs (those released in the past two years or so) have no separate OS X media in the box; instead, they rely on OS X Internet Recovery. Hold down Command-R as you restart the machine, and follow the prompts to redownload Lion or Mountain Lion from the Mac App Store and install it on the new disk.

  Get your backup or sync software up and running: After getting your Mac working again, your next step is to download and install whatever cloud backup or sync software you used. Run the software and sign in with the same account you used previously.

What happens next depends on the type of software you used:

  For sync software, such as Dropbox (), SpiderOak (), and SugarSync (), you need only wait—all your synced files will download automatically in the background.

  For backup software, such as Backblaze, CrashPlan (), or MozyHome, follow the instructions for restoring the latest copies of your backed-up files. (You might want to skip restoring backups of email, contacts, and calendars, as I'll discuss in a moment.) Restoration speed depends on the throughput of your broadband connection. If you find that it’s too slow for your needs, you can either try moving your Mac to a location with a faster connection or request that the cloud provider ship your data overnight on a hard drive, DVD, or flash drive (for an extra fee, naturally).

  While you’re waiting for your files to download or arrive at your door, you can work on several additional restoration steps.

Reinstall your applications: Most cloud backup services don’t back up your apps. You’ll have to reinstall them from the Mac App Store (Apple menu > App Store), download them from the developers’ sites, or use original installation media to get all your apps back.

 

Redownload purchased media: Using iTunes, you can redownload previous purchases of media such as music, movies, TV shows, books, and iOS apps (which you may not have included in your online backups or syncs). And if you signed up for Apple’s $25-per-year iTunes Match service, you can download fresh copies of all your music tracks (even those not purchased from Apple).

  Use Photo Stream to restore photos: If you previously enabled iCloud’s Photo Stream feature, you can open Aperture () or iPhoto (), make sure it’s still enabled (check the Photo Stream preference pane in either app), and sit back while up to 1000 of your most recent photos download to your Mac.

  Sync email, contacts, and calendars: If you rely on cloud-based services for email, contacts, and calendars—particularly iCloud, Google, Exchange servers, and (for email only) other IMAP servers—getting your data back into apps like Mail, Contacts, and Calendar is usually as easy as signing in to your account(s) and waiting for the data to synchronize from the server to your Mac. It’s better to grab all this data directly from the server rather than restoring it from backups, because the server almost certainly has fresher and more current versions of all the data, and restoring from backups may result in irritating collisions with live server syncing.

  You can redownload previous purchases in iTunes, even if you didn't back up those files. Select 'iTunes Store' in the sidebar, click the 'Purchases' link, select a type of media, and then click 'Not on This Computer' to view the items you can download.

 

If you have only a Time Machine backup

  Let’s say you wisely supplemented your cloud-based syncing or backups with Time Machine (but have no other local backups). This means you can restore every single file on your disk, including OS X itself and all your applications, to their state at the last time Time Machine ran. You can do so even if you install a completely new, blank drive. In this case the smartest move is to start by restoring the Time Machine backup (see “How to restore data from Time Machine”), and then to use your cloud sync or backup software for any files that may have changed since your last Time Machine backup. (In all probability, there will be few if any of these.)

  I should mention, however, that if you use Dolly Drive () to store your Time Machine backups in the cloud, restoring your whole disk over the Internet may be impractical (and it will certainly be very time-consuming). Dolly Drive recommends, as I do, that you also have a bootable duplicate (or “clone”) of your startup volume on a local hard disk, and that you restore that duplicate before downloading files from the cloud, as I'll cover in the next scenario.

 

If you have a bootable duplicate

  Restoring a disk from a bootable duplicate is simple. Start from the duplicate and then, using an app such as SuperDuper, select the duplicate as the source and your internal disk as the destination.If, in addition to cloud backups, you made a bootable duplicate of your entire disk, restoring that first will give you the fastest path, by far, to complete data recovery. Attach the disk containing your duplicate to your Mac, and then restart the machine while holding down the Option key. Select the duplicate and press Return to start your Mac from that disk. Then run whatever app you used to create the duplicate, such as Shirt Pocket Software’s $28 SuperDuper or Bombich Software’s $40 Carbon Copy Cloner, to reverse the process. Select your duplicate as the source and your new, empty internal disk as the destination.

  Within a few hours, the restoration should be complete. Use the Startup Disk pane of System Preferences to set your startup volume to be your internal disk, and restart. Your Mac should now be exactly as it was the last time you updated your duplicate, which, if you take my advice, will be no less often than once a week.

  Now, all that remains is to download any files you backed up to the cloud since that duplicate was last updated. For syncing services such as Dropbox, you don’t have to do anything; the download just happens automatically in the background. For certain backup apps (notably CrashPlan), unfortunately there’s no automated way to say “restore all files modified since date x.” You may have to either manually select the files you want to restore or restore everything, which will involve overwriting many files with identical copies from the cloud. That will, however, eventually get your disk back to where it was.

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Mac backup basics

Mac backup basics | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
A Mac backup plan doesn't have to be complicated. The easier a plan is to set up and follow, the more likely you are to use it and have a current backup when disaster happens.
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How to use Smart Folders on your Mac

How to use Smart Folders on your Mac | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
If you haven't yet used Smart Folders in OS X, then you may be missing out on a critical time-saving feature of the OS X Finder. Smart Folders are essentially canned searches, where you can save cu...
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Quick maintenance tips for your iOS device

Quick maintenance tips for your iOS device | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Delete unused apps and data

As with any device, if you run out of data, then you choke your device’s ability to work properly. In iOS, you should get warnings about there not being enough space to save data or perform some task, so in these cases your best bet is to delete unused apps, photos, movies, and other data from your system.
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Malwarebytes Releases Mac Product and Acquires AdwareMedic Giving Mac Users Malware Detection and Removal Capabilities

Malwarebytes Releases Mac Product and Acquires AdwareMedic Giving Mac Users Malware Detection and Removal Capabilities | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Release of Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Mac brings powerful security layer to Mac users; Acquisition to build on current OS X protection capabilities   S
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How to isolate output in the OS X Console

How to isolate output in the OS X Console | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
As programs run on your Mac, they will output their activity either to the system log or to specific log files, both of which can be viewed using OS X's Console utility, so if some aspect of your M...
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OWC USB-C Dock Pre-Order: The USB Dock designed for MacBook

OWC USB-C Dock Pre-Order: The USB Dock designed for MacBook | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
11 Ports For Your New MacBook. Meet the OWC USB-C Dock, the complete connectivity solution for your 2015 MacBook. Power your laptop and charge your mobile devices, connect fast external drives and other USB accessories, a 4K display, and much more with a single cable. With eleven ports, USB-C Dock is the gateway to possibility for your new MacBook.
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If you don't see your iOS device in iTunes for Mac - Apple Support

When you connect your iPhone, iPad, or iPod to your Mac with OS X, you should see your device in iTunes. If you don't, try these steps.
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Where does iTunes keep its iPhone backups? | Geek Guides

Where does iTunes keep its iPhone backups? | Geek Guides | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Whenever an iPhone is synchronised with iTunes, iTunes makes a backup of its data. You can view the iTunes' backup history by going to Preferences > Devices.
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TidBITS: Scary Internet Scam Becoming Disturbingly Common

TidBITS: Scary Internet Scam Becoming Disturbingly Common | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Infected Web sites are trapping users by apparently freezing their browsers, making it hard to escape. These sites offer release either by offering help that is dangerously invasive or by demanding a ransom. Not actually malware, this social engineering attack has been called “scareware” or “ransomware.”
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Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh booting - YouTube

Showing the boot process of the TAM running Mac OS 9.

http://www.macworld.com/article/2944687/the-mystery-of-the-imacs-granddaddy-the-twentieth-anniversary-macintosh.html

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OS X: About OS X Recovery - Apple Support

OS X: About OS X Recovery - Apple Support | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
OS X Lion and later include OS X Recovery. This feature includes all of the tools you need to reinstall OS X, repair your disk, and even restore from a Time Machine backup.
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About EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Mac computers - Apple Support

About EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Mac computers - Apple Support | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
This article lists firmware updates available as standalone installers for Intel-based Mac computers.
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About Time Machine local snapshots - Apple Support

About Time Machine local snapshots - Apple Support | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
When you use a Mac notebook computer and your backup drive isn't available, Time Machine makes local copies of files that you create, modify, or delete.
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Everything Search Engine

Everything Search Engine | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
  • Small installation file
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  • Quick file indexing
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My Stupid Fault: iCloud vs local iPhone backups | MacNN

My Stupid Fault: iCloud vs local iPhone backups | MacNN | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
That's the bottom line here: back up your iPhone and iPad to your Mac through iTunes, rather than an iCloud backup, and do it regularly -- if you want to be able to restore the your iOS device exactly as it was when you replace it. The iCloud backup is good in its way, particularly for people who don't tie their device to a Mac or Windows PC, but it is not as complete.
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Mac Malwarebytes free July 2015

Mac Malwarebytes free July 2015 | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Malwarebytes builds industry-leading anti-malware and internet security software to keep you safe from today's online threats.
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Recover your iCloud password with these tips

Recover your iCloud password with these tips | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
What should you do if you've lost the password for your iCloud account? If you're having trouble signing in with Apple, iCloud or the App Store then these tips will help
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Fix your Mac showing generic icons for files

Fix your Mac showing generic icons for files | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Identifying files by their icon is perhaps more important than being able to locate the programs you use, since for the most part you will likely be browsing your files when using the Finder on you...
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The Best USB 3.0 Hubs

The Best USB 3.0 Hubs | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
After 100 hours of research, testing, and consulting with electrical engineers, we determined that the $50 HooToo HT-UH010 seven-port hub is the best USB hub for most people. It’s compact, reliable...
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Bushel | Manage and protect your Apple devices anytime from anywhere.

Bushel | Manage and protect your Apple devices anytime from anywhere. | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Bushel is a cloud-based Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution for the Mac, iPhone, iPad and iPod devices in your workplace. Designed to make the complex tasks simple so you can focus on business.
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Data Recovery Pricing | Western Data Recovery

Data Recovery Pricing | Western Data Recovery | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Data Recovery pricing doesn't always have to be expensive. We offer all levels of data recovery with pricing starting at $349.
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Apple drops Recovery Key in new two-factor authentication for El Capitan and iOS 9

Apple drops Recovery Key in new two-factor authentication for El Capitan and iOS 9 | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Apple said at WWDC it would build a more integrated and comprehensive two-factor security system into its next OS releases, and today explains what that means.
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How to install adware | Apple Support Communities

How to install adware | Apple Support Communities | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it

The purpose of this User Tip is not to serve as instructions for installing malware. Clearly no one wants to do that, but intrusive and annoying adware has emerged as an increasing threat to one's Internet activity.


   Recognizing and avoiding adware is simple, but there are plenty of people new to the Mac whose prior experience with Windows PCs may have inured them to taking thoughtless actions that aren't prudent on any computing platform.

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Fix Mail not sending or receiving messages after updating OS X

Fix Mail not sending or receiving messages after updating OS X | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
After having updated OS X to the latest version (currently version 10.10.4), you may find that while Mail will launch and display messages, it may not send or receive new ones. In some cases this p...
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How-To: Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's pictures (Part 1)

How-To: Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's pictures (Part 1) | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Apple knew it had something special to share with the world when it released iPhoto in 2002: in addition to printing 20" by 30" poster-sized photos, the original iPhoto's "most stunning feature" (a...
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