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How to Devise Passwords That Drive Hackers Away

How to Devise Passwords That Drive Hackers Away | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
It’s a good idea to be a little paranoid about password theft, and there are several ways to strengthen your defenses.

A PASSWORD MANAGER? MAYBE

  Password-protection software lets you store all your usernames and passwords in one place. Some programs will even create strong passwords for you and automatically log you in to sites as long as you provide one master password. LastPass, SplashData and AgileBits offer password management software for Windows, Macs and mobile devices. But consider yourself warned: Mr. Kocher said he did not use the software because even with encryption, it still lived on the computer itself. “If someone steals my computer, I’ve lost my passwords.” Mr. Grossman said he did not trust the software because he didn’t write it. Indeed, at a security conference in Amsterdam earlier this year, hackers demonstrated how easily the cryptography used by many popular mobile password managers could be cracked.

IGNORE SECURITY QUESTIONS

  There is a limited set of answers to questions like “What is your favorite color?” and most answers to questions like “What middle school did you attend?” can be found on the Internet. Hackers use that information to reset your password and take control of your account. Earlier this year, a hacker claimed he was able to crack into Mitt Romney’s Hotmail and Dropbox accounts using the name of his favorite pet. A better approach would be to enter a password hint that has nothing to do with the question itself. For example, if the security question asks for the name of the hospital in which you were born, your answer might be: “Your favorite song lyric.”

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NEW! Track When Your Emails Are Opened - cloudHQ Blog

NEW! Track When Your Emails Are Opened - cloudHQ Blog | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
With this Free Email Tracker, you can get email tracking that tells you who opened your email, who didn\’t, and if someone is avoiding you.
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All About Apple File System | APFS white paper

All About Apple File System | APFS white paper | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
The move from HFS+ to Apple File System (APFS) with macOS High Sierra is a good thing. And with this handy guide, you’ll have everything you need to prepare.
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Important High Sierra Changes for IT Admins

Important High Sierra Changes for IT Admins | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
APFS-related Changes -- Apple’s new APFS file system is a significant change for Macs, although the fact that it has been successfully installed on hundreds of millions of iOS devices (running iOS 10.3), Apple Watches, and Apple TVs suggests that Apple has the conversion process under control. Nevertheless, the Mac world is far more variable, and there are a few implications that IT admins should know:

The macOS Installer automatically converts the drives of SSD-based Macs to APFS during installation of High Sierra. You cannot opt out of APFS in this situation.

Macs with hard disk drives and Fusion Drives are not automatically converted to APFS during the High Sierra upgrade. I anticipate that will change at a later date. You can convert them manually using Edit > Convert to APFS in Disk Utility, although there’s no inherent reason to do so immediately.



Drives formatted as Mac OS Extended (HFS+) can be read from and written to by Macs whose drives are formatted as APFS.

Drives formatted as APFS can be read from and written to by Macs whose drives are formatted as APFS, or HFS+, if the Mac is running High Sierra in the latter case. However, APFS-formatted drives, such as external hard disks and USB flash drives, cannot be read by Macs running older versions of macOS, even 10.12 Sierra.

FileVault volumes are converted from HFS+ to APFS just like unencrypted volumes.

Although Apple’s Boot Camp Windows environment is compatible with High Sierra, it cannot read from or write to APFS-formatted volumes.

If you’re sharing a volume formatted as APFS over the network, you must use SMB or NFS, not the increasingly deprecated AFP. (SMB has been the preferred file sharing protocol for several versions of macOS now.) That applies to Time Machine share points as well.

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High Sierra (macOS 10.13)

Be careful!  This has changed if you're running macOS 10.12.4 or later. From my Using the macOS Recovery Modes (10.7 or later) article on MacStrategy:

To boot into Recovery Mode, on startup:
Hold down the Command + R keys (Reinstall the latest macOS / OS X that was installed on your Mac, without upgrading to a later version)
or hold down the Command + Option + R keys (Upgrade to the latest macOS / OS X that is compatible with your Mac)
or hold down the Command + Option + Shift + R keys (Reinstall the macOS / OS X that came with your Mac, or the version closest to it that is still available - requires mac OS 10.12.4 or later)
or hold down the Option key and choose "Recovery HD" from the Startup Manager
And note the wording "that came with your Mac, or the version closest to it that is still available"!
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macOS High Sierra tech preview: A quick look at the stuff you can’t see

macOS High Sierra tech preview: A quick look at the stuff you can’t see | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
A peek at what APFS, Metal 2, and HEVC/HEIF support mean for you and your Mac.
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iTunes 12.7: How to cope with the abrupt changes

iTunes 12.7: How to cope with the abrupt changes | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
iTunes just lost the iOS App Store and ringtone downloads, and reorganized other parts. Here's what you need to know to help ease the transition.
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Tech Tips: A Few Pointers on Things To Do Before Upgrading to High Sierra

We pass along some helpful tips on some things to do before upgrading to High Sierra.
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Can ransomware hijack Mac backups? Yes, but...

Can ransomware hijack Mac backups? Yes, but... | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
There are ways to protect your backups from rare ransomware attacks.
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Remote Control a Mac with Screen Sharing in Mac OS X

Remote Control a Mac with Screen Sharing in Mac OS X | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Remote Control a Mac with Screen Sharing in Mac OS X
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If you forgot the passcode for your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, or your device is disabled

If you forgot your passcode, or if a message says that your device is disabled, follow these steps to remove your passcode.
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Safe Mode & Single-User Mode: What They Are, How to Use Them

Safe Mode & Single-User Mode: What They Are, How to Use Them | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Safe mode and single-user mode are two of the special start-up modes that your Mac can be powered up to. They're often used to troubleshoot issues a Mac may be
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How Some Thunderbolt 3 Cables Underperform with USB-only Drives

How Some Thunderbolt 3 Cables Underperform with USB-only Drives | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
AppleInsider found a mismatch with certain Thunderbolt 3 cables and USB-C drives that support only USB standards. We checked it out and were able to confirm AppleInsider’s results.
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Web site builders compared and reviewed

Web site builders compared and reviewed | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Squarespace Packed with features and beautiful themes. Highly recommended.
Squarespace.com
Weebly Perfect for anyone looking for something easy to use.
Weebly.com
Wix Good option for those wanting detailed control of their website.
Wix.com
Voog Good for multilingual websites.
Voog.com
Strikingly The best way to create long-form, one page websites
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Preparing for the upgrade to macOS High Sierra | Carbon Copy Cloner | Bombich Software

Preparing for the upgrade to macOS High Sierra | Carbon Copy Cloner | Bombich Software | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Preparing your Mac for the High Sierra upgrade
Before you upgrade to High Sierra, it is imperative to understand that downgrading to your previous OS will be impossible without a bootable backup of the previous OS. Before you apply the upgrade, we recommend that you establish a bootable backup of your current OS on an external USB, Firewire, or Thunderbolt hard drive, then verify that you can boot your Mac from that backup disk. Before you pull the trigger on the upgrade, detach that external disk from your Mac and set it aside.

For more detailed advice on preparing for the upgrade and instructions on how to downgrade, check out this CCC knowledgebase article:

Best practices for updating your Mac's OS.
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Take Control of Upgrading to High Sierra

Take Control of Upgrading to High Sierra | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
You’ll experience an easy upgrade and deal quickly with post-installation quirks with these topics:

Start fast: A Quick Start overview helps you read lightly or more deeply, depending on your needs.
Take in the view: Find out what you can look forward to in High Sierra.
Compatibility check: Make sure your hardware and software are ready for High Sierra and consider whether this is a good time to buy new hardware, even if it’s not essential for your upgrade.
Backing up: Avoid upgrade anxiety by ensuring you can return to the previous state of your Mac—and that you can boot from your backup. Joe provides steps for carrying out this essential task in Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper.
Picking a plan: Go for an easy in-place upgrade or consider a more complex clean install. Find out which option is right for you.
Installing: Download and store the installer where it won’t be deleted, with special tips for people who want to install on multiple Macs or who have bandwidth limitations. And, although running the installer will be easy for many people, you’ll find full steps for what to click and when.
Post-installation tune-up: Make sure your new system is running smoothly by completing a few important housekeeping tasks and making a few key decisions.
Troubleshooting: Yikes! It is possible that something will go wrong during installation, or that once you’ve booted up under High Sierra that you’ll encounter a serious problem. Joe’s time-tested troubleshooting advice will help get your system working again.
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Update: macOS High Sierra and APFS Compatibility

Update: macOS High Sierra and APFS Compatibility | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
We now have a bit more information on macOS High Sierra, Apple File System, and how it all works on Macs and on volumes that are formatted with the legacy HFS+
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Emailchemy – the Email Alchemist $30 family $50

Emailchemy – the Email Alchemist $30 family $50 | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Emailchemy can read:
AOL for Mac (v3 and newer)
AOL for Windows (“PFC” files)
AOL Desktop for Mac
Apple Mail
Claris Emailer for Macintosh
CompuServe Classic for Macintosh (MacCIM)
CompuServe for Windows
Entourage (Database, .RGE and cache files)
Eudora
Mozilla
Mulberry
Musashi
Neoplanet
Netscape
Opera
Outlook for Mac (8.x, 2001, 2011, 2015, 2016)
Outlook for Windows (MSG, PST and OST files)
Outlook Express for Macintosh
Outlook Express for Windows
Outlook Express for UNIX/Solaris
Outspring
PowerTalk/AOCE for Macintosh
QuickMail Pro for Macintosh
QuickMail Pro for Windows
Thunderbird
Windows Live Mail
Windows Mail
Yahoo! Mail
any UNIX-style or mbox-format mailbox
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Tech Tip: How to Force Restart a MacBook Pro with Touch Bar

Tech Tip: How to Force Restart a MacBook Pro with Touch Bar | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
I have a very embarrassing admission to make: after 33 years of being a Mac user, I was completely stumped when I recently tried to force quit and restart
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MacStrategy | Article | Virtualising Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard (Server)

MacStrategy | Article | Virtualising Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard (Server) | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Instructions for installing, setting up and virtualising Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard (Server) on a modern Mac so you can use Rosetta (PowerPC) based applications.
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New iMac Thunderbolt 3, USB C, and USB3

2017-08-31 at 00:00 #24118   (68)
macanix
This is more of a rant and "pointing a finger at Apple" than at the iMac I just unboxed:

Set up a new iMac 27"... had overlooked the "Thunderbolt 3/USB-C" ports.

Needed to add a second display (new 4K Dell), because it can rotate for portrait mode. And it was 1/3 cost of the LG that Apple pushes (which doesn't rotate... unless you invest in some VESA mounting...).

Not too keen on Dell, either, as it includes no HDMI cable, but it does include DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort. But that didn't work with Apple's adaptor.

Apple's online store has no cable solution. None. I did get the Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adaptor, but that doesn't work.
I missed the paragraph on one page

Quote:
Note that although it uses a Mini DisplayPort connector, the Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter doesn't support connections to Mini DisplayPort displays.
But later found the issue was

Quote:
This adapter does not support DisplayPort displays like the Apple LED Cinema Display or third-party DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort displays.
In truth, it should be called a Thunderbolt storage adaptor, or LG 5K adaptor... because that's all folks (Apple's Thunderbolt display needs some extra power... to work).

I ordered and await some 3rd-party cable that is a USB-C to Displayport (and reviewers said it works with latest Macbook Pro and iMac).

I also ordered a Cablematters product (USB-C to HDMI) and need a HiSpeed HDMI cable... which I will also try with Apple's USB-C AV adaptor that has HDMI.

BTW, first time, in migrating hundreds of Macs, that I have seen the worst. After the migration, the user had much damage to his library ("...needs repair. Enter password..."). This was a first for me. I suspected some permission issue. But, hey, Sierra's Disk Utility neutered that. Oh, and I even tried Onyx to repair permissions, nope. But it wasn't about repairing permissions; it was about resetting them. If you ever get an error after a migration that required you to repair a library or application, or another version of an app is running (e.g. Firefox) and it is verified not running, visit this link:

   "Resolve issues caused by changing the permissions of items in your home folder"

How can Apple, release a product and use a technology without the slightest offering of supporting it? Does Tim Cook just waltz around, cashing out stock and dreaming of being this "new southern philanthropist" and no clue what customers need? And, thinking positive, when I do get the 4K working, I'm going to be looking at the iMac as a hydra mass of cabling and adaptors. (Dock would be nice but... not in the user's budget). Little, turkey-necked gnomes running around in glee, "Y'all hear? We just signed Belkin to make adaptors so we don't have to! Who cares about QC... it's not a 'designed in California' product! AAPL poppinfresh! Whoa, dude, 1pm and surf's up, outta here!"

I was able to boot the previous iMac into Target Disk mode, but unable to mount it via Thunderbolt 3-2 cabling/adaptor thingee. I had to go the slow-route of using an ethernet cable (autoXconnects) but at least it didn't compare to another. I was not keen on a new Mac, a TouchBar Macbook Pro, taking six hours to migrate (sigh, hindsight suggests older Macbook Pro had directory issues... but that was a rush project ha.. 6 hours). "About 15 minutes remain to copy 68 GB...About 8 hours remain to copy 12 GB... About 2 days remain to copy 2 GB..."... at least I was on the clock...

So, why did Apple bail on their own 4K/5K display? Tell me it would be prohibitive. Please. An almost trillion-dollar company, and it can't even provide a turnkey, in-house, solution for two displays. And then there is the $5000 baby coming... oh joy... the iMac Pro... lapse. Hmm... does it still need a pair of cables to display 5K output? Pretty Space Grey keyboard, though...lookee... four USB-C ports but still... four USB-3 ports... sigh.
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2017-08-31 at 15:24 #24165   (69)
David Charlap
(2017-08-31 at 00:00)macanix wrote:  
Not too keen on Dell, either, as it includes no HDMI cable, but it does include DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort. But that didn't work with Apple's adaptor.

Apple's online store has no cable solution. None. I did get the Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adaptor, but that doesn't work....
You are correct. And it's not supposed to. The problem/confusion here is that those USB-C ports you have support a variety of different technologies, depending on what you attach. It can be Thunderbolt 3, Thunderbolt 1 or 2 (with an adapter), USB (natively to another USB-C device, or via an adapter to a device that attaches to a type-A connector. Note also that a USB 1 or 2 adapter will not support USB 3), DisplayPort (with an adapter), HDMI or DVI (with adapters, since they are subsets of DisplayPort).

On a Mac with Thunderbolt 1 or 2 interfaces, you have one (mini-DP) connector that can support Thunderbolt 1 or 2, DisplayPort, DVI (with an adapter), HDMI (with an adapter) or VGA (with an adapter.)

The critical point here is that all of the above are different mutually-incompatible technologies. Thunderbolt 3 is not compatible with DisplayPort. You can plug the different devices into a Mac's port because the Mac is designed to detect these different devices and will dynamically reconfigure the port to support what it detects. But it can not, and will not, do this for devices attached further downstream.

Similarly, Thunderbolt 1 or 2 and DisplayPort are completely incompatible. An adapter that supports one will not support the other. So you can't plug a mini DisplayPort monitor into a Thunderbolt adapter, and you can't plug a Thunderbolt device into a mini DisplayPort adapter.

In order to attach a DisplayPort monitor to a USB-C/Thunderbolt-3 port, you must use a DisplayPort (not Thunderbolt) cable or adapter. A quick Amazon search finds a USB-C to DisplayPort cable, a USB-C to mini DisplayPort cable, a USB-C to DisplayPort adapter and a USB-C to mini DisplayPort adapter.

Please note that the search produced over 1000 hits. I cited the first device of each type. I have no personal experience with any of them. I just wanted to point out that you can get the kind of adapter/cable you need to make the connection, even though Apple doesn't sell them.
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Transfer Files Between Remote Macs with Screen Sharing in OS X

Transfer Files Between Remote Macs with Screen Sharing in OS X | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Transfer Files Between Remote Macs with Screen Sharing in OS X
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Back Up or Move Mail, Bookmarks, Address Book, iCal to a New Mac

Back Up or Move Mail, Bookmarks, Address Book, iCal to a New Mac | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Transferring data from a Mac can be accomplished in numerous ways. We look at moving individual app data as well as using Migration Assistant.
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Guest Article: How to Bulletproof Your Backups

Guest Article: How to Bulletproof Your Backups | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Backing up is the first rule for protecting your data and clearly it has real benefits, yet it’s surprising how many people don’t do it or…don’t do it right.
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TestingXperts's comment, September 5, 9:06 AM
very nice
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Why the Mac needs iCloud Backup

Why the Mac needs iCloud Backup | Mac Tech Support | Scoop.it
Sure, Time Machine is great, but having a cloud-based backup system for the Mac would make Apple’s storage suite complete.
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