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Synthetic Biology: Key Field of the Future

Synthetic Biology: Key Field of the Future | m | Scoop.it
Synthetic biology is a field of science that has been emerging in the last few years and could have a significant future impact with the potential to pro-actively manage biology and reshape many industrial sectors.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Synthetic Biology Explained

From selective breeding to genetic modification, our understanding of biology is now merging with the principles of engineering to bring us synthetic biology...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Miscellaneous Topics
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New Dolphin Species Found in Australian Waters | Biology | Sci-News.com

New Dolphin Species Found in Australian Waters | Biology | Sci-News.com | m | Scoop.it
An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of a new species of humpback dolphin in the waters off northern Australia.

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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Tracking the Future
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Synthetic Biology Begins To Deliver

Synthetic Biology Begins To Deliver | m | Scoop.it

Synthetic biology moves us from reading to writing DNA, allowing us to design biological systems from scratch for any number of applications. Its capabilities are becoming clearer, its first products and processes emerging. Synthetic biology’s reach already extends from reducing our dependence on oil to transforming how we develop medicines and food crops. It is being heralded as the next big thing; whether it fulfils that expectation remains to be seen. It will require collaboration and multi-disciplinary approaches to development, application and regulation. Interesting times ahead!


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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The Plant Cell reviews alternative splicing

The Plant Cell reviews alternative splicing | m | Scoop.it

Two reviews on the complexity and consequences of alternative splicing in plants, and an In Brief overview.

 

Reddy, A.S.N., Marquez, Y., Kalyna, M., and Barta, A. (2013). Complexity of the alternative splicing landscape in plants. Plant Cell 25: www.plantcell.org/content/early/2013/10/31/tpc.113.117523.abstract ;

 

Staiger, D., and Brown, J.W.S. (2013). Alternative splicing at the intersection of biological timing, development, and stress responses. Plant Cell 25: www.plantcell.org/content/early/2013/10/31/tpc.113.113803.abstract ;

 

In Brief: www.plantcell.org/content/early/2013/10/31/tpc.113.251013.full.pdf ;


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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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A multifunctional nano carrier to detect, diagnose, and deliver drugs to cancer cells | KurzweilAI

A multifunctional nano carrier to detect, diagnose, and deliver drugs to cancer cells | KurzweilAI | m | Scoop.it

A unique nanostructure developed by a team of international researchers* promises improved all-in-one detection, diagnoses, and drug-delivery treatment of cancer cells.

It can carry a variety of cancer-fighting materials on its double-sided (Janus) surface and within its porous interior


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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Tracking the Future
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Biology Confronts Data Complexity

Biology Confronts Data Complexity | m | Scoop.it

New technologies have launched the life sciences into the age of big data. Biologists must now make sense of their informational windfall.


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Gary Bamford's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:53 AM

The very definition of 'complexity'!

Germán Morales's curator insight, October 22, 2013 11:26 AM

Tratar la vida como un cumulo de datos... qué se yo... estamos yendo a eso.

tatiyana fuentes's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:49 AM

It was difficult to find sequence the human genome, but now it’s comparatively simple to compare genomes of the microorganisms living in our bodies, the ocean, the soil, and everywhere because of the new technologies. Life scientists are embarking on countless other big data projects, including efforts to analyze the genomes of many cancers, to map the human brain, and to develop better biofuels and other crops. Compared to fields like physics, astronomy and computer science that have been dealing with the challenges of massive datasets for decades, the big data revolution in biology has also been quick, leaving little time to adapt. Biologists must overcome a number of hurdles, from storing and moving data to integrating and analyzing it, which will require a substantial cultural shift.

Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Science News
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Synthetic Biology: Key Field of the Future

Synthetic Biology: Key Field of the Future | m | Scoop.it
Synthetic biology is a field of science that has been emerging in the last few years and could have a significant future impact with the potential to pro-actively manage biology and reshape many industrial sectors.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Beautiful microscopy / biology images

Beautiful microscopy / biology images | m | Scoop.it

Beautiful pictures obtained by confocal microscopy provided by the Sean Carroll Laboratory in Madison, WI.

 

http://tinyurl.com/7q5oudy

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Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Tracking the Future
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Why Synthetic Biology Is the Field of the Future

Why Synthetic Biology Is the Field of the Future | m | Scoop.it

Synthetic biology is a relatively young field, begun only about ten years ago. But in that time, we have made some astonishing progress. This is due, in part, to the enormous improvements in our ability to synthesize and sequence DNA. But we’ve also gained a much greater understanding of how the various parts of the genome interact. We now can reliably combine various genetic pieces to produce a range of consumer products, from biofuels to cosmetics.

 

In medicine, the synthetic biology community is pushing the boundaries by designing microbes that will seek and destroy tumors in the body before self-destructing. Synthetic biology also provides us a way to clean up our environment. We can build organisms to consume toxic chemicals in water or soil that would not otherwise decompose, for example. It can also help us to better understand flu strains and create vaccines. Synthetic biology will even help us feed the world. At MIT, researchers are working to build a process that will allow plants to fix nitrogen. If successful, farmers will no longer require fertilizer for their crops.

That’s not all we’re doing with plants, either. At the Joint BioEnergy Institute in California, scientists have found a way to expand the sugar content of biomass crops to increase their density and decrease the cost of biofuels produced from them. We envision that eventually we will be able to build just about anything from biology. Don’t be surprised if one day your computer has biological parts.


Via Gerd Moe-Behrens, Szabolcs Kósa
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, February 28, 2013 6:48 PM

by
Jay Keasling

"Most Americans may not be familiar with synthetic biology, but they may come to appreciate its advances someday soon. Synthetic biology focuses on creating technologies for designing and building biological organisms. A multidisciplinary effort, it calls biologists, engineers, software developers, and others to collaborate on finding ways to understand how genetic parts work together, and then to combine them to produce useful applications.

 Synthetic biology is a relatively young field, begun only about ten years ago. But in that time, we have made some astonishing progress. This is due, in part, to the enormous improvements in our ability to synthesize and sequence DNA. But we’ve also gained a much greater understanding of how the various parts of the genome interact. We now can reliably combine various genetic pieces to produce a range of consumer products, from biofuels to cosmetics....."

http://to.pbs.org/Z0UEAQ

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One-pot DNA construction for synthetic biology: the Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers (MODAL) strategy

One-pot DNA construction for synthetic biology: the Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers (MODAL) strategy | m | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, October 25, 2013 3:22 PM

by
Arturo Casini, James T. MacDonald, Joachim De Jonghe, Georgia Christodoulou, Paul S. Freemont, Geoff S. Baldwin and Tom Ellis

"Overlap-directed DNA assembly methods allow multiple DNA parts to be assembled together in one reaction. These methods, which rely on sequence homology between the ends of DNA parts, have become widely adopted in synthetic biology, despite being incompatible with a key principle of engineering: modularity. To answer this, we present MODAL: a Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers strategy that brings modularity to overlap-directed methods, allowing assembly of an initial set of DNA parts into a variety of arrangements in one-pot reactions. MODAL is accompanied by a custom software tool that designs overlap linkers to guide assembly, allowing parts to be assembled in any specified order and orientation. The in silico design of synthetic orthogonal overlapping junctions allows for much greater efficiency in DNA assembly for a variety of different methods compared with using non-designed sequence. In tests with three different assembly technologies, the MODAL strategy gives assembly of both yeast and bacterial plasmids, composed of up to five DNA parts in the kilobase range with efficiencies of between 75 and 100%. It also seamlessly allows mutagenesis to be performed on any specified DNA parts during the process, allowing the one-step creation of construct libraries valuable for synthetic biology applications."


 http://bit.ly/1ajuUXy

Rescooped by Catalina Boldrini from Tracking the Future
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Biology's Brave New World

Biology's Brave New World | m | Scoop.it

All the key barriers to the artificial synthesis of viruses and bacteria have been overcome, spawning a dizzying array of perils and promises. But as the scientific community forges ahead, the biosecurity establishment remains behind the curve.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Mario Gonzalez's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:32 AM

Reading this article astounded me and reasured my intrest in Biology and is just ridiculously interesting

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Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's | m | Scoop.it

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, together with researchers at the Polish Wroclaw University of Technology, have made a discovery that may lead to the curing of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the so called mad cow disease) through photo therapy.
The researchers discovered that it is possible to distinguish aggregations of the proteins, believed to cause the diseases, from the the well-functioning proteins in the body by using multi-photon laser technique.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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