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BY 10/31 -- NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say

BY 10/31 -- NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Agency positioned itself to collect from among millions of accounts, many belonging to Americans.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This discusses how public networks like Yahoo and Google are being tapped into by the NSA in order to provide security for Americans through access to lots of personal info. These networks have stated they do not want their databases to be tapped into by the NSA, but that is meerely just a claim. Although, both yahoo and google have started to make a move by encrypting their data in order to prevent any hacking. I think that this is going too far. What happened to privacy? Isn't that OUR right. The NSA is using the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to justify their recent moves and decisions.

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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:23 PM

NSA has secretly broken into the main communications link that connect yahoo and google data centers around the world. The company collects data from hundreds of millions accounts. This is not legal or constitutional, they should at least say something to us about this. They should not hide this. 

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 25, 5:02 PM

This article talks about the new program made by the NSA called MUSCULAR, which allows them to exploit data centers and flows from companies like Google and Yahoo. This article tells us about the negative feelings towards the federal government as overreaching its powers, the NSA says they only collect information on valid foreign targets, but who really knows.

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 3, 7:55 PM
I think that it is good for us to know what the government is doing but also it makes the USA look weak if one of our own is going and publishing private information that is vital to the security of the US. I think that on the otherhand i do not really want to know all of the spying that the government is doing i would rather not know if the gvt feels the need to infiltrate yahoo and goodle for information that they think could potentially harm the US then go ahead and do it but i think that again citizens have the rights to privacy and Snowden did a very couragous thing by standing up for the rights of the US citizens.

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Rescooped by Melissa Aleman from Government and Economics
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The once and future currency

The once and future currency | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
“LUMPY, unpredictable, potentially large”: that was how Tim Geithner, then head of the New York Federal Reserve, described the need for dollars in emerging...

Via Joel Leagans
Melissa Aleman's insight:

After reading this, what I received from the article is that America wants to expand. America wants to be able to pull other countries into the economy and build trading relationships that could be beneficial all around. I feel like this might be a good yet risky opportunity/idea because it would be good for the country to branch out somewhat to other economies other than just the ones we are associated with now. The dollar is a very important and strong currency in not just our economy, but others as well in the market worldwide and if America decides to expand, it could result in positives making their mark in other economies. Although it may all seem like it would be good to expand, it might not as well. It could be too big of a risk to take and looking at our economy compared to others, we are pretty well off, doing fine.

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Madi Gordon's comment, April 7, 1:09 PM
Though I find this article interesting, like Crystal, it was hard to completely understand. I find it noteworthy that despite the recent recession, the United States had the largest GDP in the world. I mean hey, compared to Greece I think we're doing just fine. Despite the dollar’s depreciation, banks and firms still borrow in dollars. That's got to be good, right? At the end of the article, the author writes, “America’s sophistication has one final implication: the dollar has no long-term tendency to strengthen.” This could be bad for the US economy.
Jiahao Chen's comment, April 7, 4:00 PM
The dollar’s position is “suboptimal but stable and self-reinforcing,” Mr Prasad says so....I think exchange of currency is not as good as what we think, it is not a ideal exchange of money, what we supposed to do should be something like economic ways, what we expecting is trading more and more investments and building up new firms would increase in the money inflow and also increase the value of US currency, since too much money directly exchange would naturally depreciate the value, it's not a big problem though but i would cause problem if we are not dealing with it...And free exchange, is not as good as free trade, it would not even be helpful to our economic situation right now.......People need dollars......everyone wanna keep dollars in pocket, but should be in a smart way.
Melissa Aleman's comment, April 8, 3:03 PM
After reading this, what I received from the article is that America wants to expand. America wants to be able to pull other countries into the economy and build trading relationships that could be beneficial all around. I feel like this might be a good yet risky opportunity/idea because it would be good for the country to branch out somewhat to other economies other than just the ones we are associated with now. The dollar is a very important and strong currency in not just our economy, but others as well in the market worldwide and if America decides to expand, it could result in positives making their mark in other economies. Although it may all seem like it would be good to expand, it might not as well. It could be too big of a risk to take and looking at our economy compared to others, we are pretty well off, doing fine.
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Why Obamacare Was Worth It*

Why Obamacare Was Worth It* | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
The ACA deadline is here. And It's Still OK to Feel Good About it. 

Via Joel Leagans
Melissa Aleman's insight:

The Affordable Care Act is too fresh to really be able to distinguish what really can come from it. The Act has had a very rough start with the difficult sign ups and crashes. It has been helpful in some ways allowing people to receive what they can't afford but the lasting outcomes are still unknown. Whether the Affordable Care Act is good for society or not will always be a debate, but if Obama doesnt present it in a new way and fix the flaws, then their won't be as many people enrolling for it.

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Michael Newton's comment, April 8, 9:39 AM
A lot of people are saying that the ACA will be worth it in the long tun but i'm confused to what they mean by that. The ACA is a good thing for a lot of people and I think the economic and social benefits will be pretty quickly evident. If it's a failure I don't think it's going to take a long time to determine that either - but I think this would be unlikely.
Melissa Aleman's comment, April 8, 2:35 PM
The Affordable Care Act is too fresh to really be able to distinguish what really can come from it. The Act has had a very rough start with the difficult sign ups and crashes. It has been helpful in some ways allowing people to receive what they can't afford but the lasting outcomes are still unknown. Whether the Affordable Care Act is good for society or not will always be a debate, but if Obama doesnt present it in a new way and fix the flaws, then their won't be as many people enrolling for it.
Mayline Zhong's comment, May 21, 11:11 AM
There has been a lot of controversy surrounding the Affordable Care Act. Despite its rough start and negative publicity, I believe it will pull through. The pros will ultimately outweigh the cons. The two goals, to improve economic security and to reform medical care in general, are goals worth fighting for. You cannot deny the fact that as a result of the ACA, more people have been able to obtain health care and more people have received their money's worth.
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Pre-Super Bowl, Obama spars with Bill O’Reilly

Pre-Super Bowl, Obama spars with Bill O’Reilly | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
President Barack Obama faced questions Sunday on Obamacare, Benghazi and the IRS’s targeting of conservative groups during a pre-Super Bowl interview with Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and dismissed much of the criticism of him as ginned up by the cable news channel. “These kinds of things keep on surfacing in part because you and your...

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Katherine Banks's comment, February 16, 11:11 PM
o'reilly really hit Obama with all the hard hitting questions that the american people have been waiting to hear the answers to. I was particularly interested in the topic of firing Mrs. Sibelius for the issues that arose with the health care website it felt like to me he wasn't giving a direct answer as to what was being done just that everyone's action where being accounted for. He also neglected to explain why he lied to us about keeping our health insurance if we liked the plan the question was dodged which makes me wonder if it was never his promise to make. Yes this article has lots of hard hitting questions but in my opinion Obama's answers where lacking.
Stephanie Yard's curator insight, February 17, 1:22 PM

Obama blames news channels for promoting Obamacare, Syria, Libya, etc which has led to much criticism.  I think part is because of TV promoting, but also due to his actions and words.  With Syria, Obama should not think that the U.S. military could punish Assad’s forces because links to al-Qaeda are linked- putting US at risk.  “I try to focus not on the fumbles, but on the next play” sums up Obama.  He tends to promise to make changes to the country, but he ends up trying to fix more than he can handle.  I agree with O’Reilly when he says “but I think your heart is in the right place”.  Obama has good intentions, he just needs to carry out his plans.  

Melissa Aleman's comment, February 17, 4:05 PM
I completely agree with Jolie in the decrease in confidence I had in him as a leader. Even though I stand on the republican party side you still have to have faith in your president and this just lowered mine to some aspect. He didnt address any of O'Reilleys questions with confidence and tried to slip out of answering them. It almost feels likes hes trying to hide secrets from the public which is not comforting.
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BY 11/3 -- Secession Movement

BY 11/3 -- Secession Movement | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This article talks about citizens, counties, and groups in general in certain states claiming that they want to secede from their state and make a new one. The main group that seems to have a problem is the Republicans living in a Democratic region. For example in Colorado, a vote is going tobe held for secession. I  think that if people have problems with beliefs and the way things work in a certain state, that they should leave. You cant change the whole state to meet all of your standards.

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Maddie Callen's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:28 PM

This article is about how certain rural areas in colorado want to suceed. The topic is interesting and I remember a few years ago when there was talk of texas suceeding and all I thought was "would Rick Perry be our President? weird" it would be hard for areas like that to support themselves as their own country but I can see why they would want to because they feel left out of politics. i wonder how they feel about the electoral college and if they feel like their votes dont count,.

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 28, 3:29 PM

The article says that many counties's rural residents  are feeling the need secede and create a new state. Northern counties want to create their own state because they don't agree with the rest of colorado. While the creation of a new state seems a bit extreme, I feel like these residents need to be better represented to avoid ideas like secession. 

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 3, 8:00 PM
I think this is simple if you don't like where you live move. It would be completely outrageous to secede and create another state let alone new gvt. The economy would fail and it would be a mess.
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BY 10/31 -- Nightly News: Obama’s approval rating drops to all-time low

NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This video explains the president's approval ratings have dropped and the affect Obama's leadership has on the nation.  I think the trials of Obama have been difficult and must be difficult for him to juggle everything. It makes sense as to why Obama has lost approval ratings because the public is tired of not getting what was promised. Especially now with the NSA leaks as well...He may continue to lose approval.

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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:18 PM

This video shows that people are becoming very dissatisfied with Obama, resulting from  not successfully following through on your actions. ObamaCare was such a controverisial and risky decision by the Obama administration that has caused many problems. Obama should not be surprised that a lot of people disapprove of his actions, but I believe that he could turn it around by doing something profound sometime soon.

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 25, 5:39 PM

It's not shocking that President Obama's presidential rating and personal rating have gotten dropped to an all-time low. I agree that President Obama should show more involvement with fixing the Obamacare issues because as of right now he's shown very little, and that's one of the many reasons his rating is so low.

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 2, 11:47 PM

Obamas ratings have dropped a lot since the beginning of his presidency the obamacare does not seem to be working out for him very well. His ratings used to be a lot higher and now they are making a record breaking low. 

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BY 10/31-- Sebelius apologizes for healthcare website debacle

NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

Sebelius addresses the whole healthcare site issue and takes full credit for the problems. I think she handled this the right way and very professionally. By admitting to her faults, she is showing responsibility and confidence that she can fix it. You can tell that she really cares about this project because it takes a lot to take the heat for im sure that is more than just her problem.

 

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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:09 PM

Sebelius keeps apologizing for the problems with the Obamacare website, taking complete responsibility for the dysfunctionality of the incident. Officials in charge also reassure the public that, within 30 days, the site will be up and ready to be used to sign up for coverage.

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 25, 4:40 PM

This video tells us how Sebelius takes the blame for the failed lauch of Obamacare. Sge later ended up answering the people's questions based on promises the president made. I think it was smart of Sebelius to take the blame for it because it encourages people to trust her and she is wise in saving others deserving of blame.

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 3, 7:47 PM
I dont like Obama so I do not really like his healthcare and the fact that the website was having problems makes it even more sketchy and harder for it to be promoted and talked about well.
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BY 10/24 -- Ted Cruz returns to Texas as a hero who is reshaping the state Republican Party

BY 10/24 -- Ted Cruz returns to Texas as a hero who is reshaping the state Republican Party | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Although a newcomer, he is rapidly becoming the model for GOP politicians throughout the state.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

In this article, it describes how Ted Cruz is either one or the other, really liked or disliked, in the country. But right now he is very liked by Texas returning as a hero although disliked in the Senate. I like how Cruz is receiving credit in Texas because I like how he stands up for his beliefs and takes risks. I think its fascinating how they predict Texas will become purple but I dont necessarily believe that a continuously red state for multiple years will all of a sudden go purple.

 

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Chris Buenaseda's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:22 PM

Being a new participant in the Senate, Ted Cruz has pretty big shoes to fill. While he may represent a cosnervative state, the rest of the US is slowly becoming more liberal. House Republicans favor Cruz while the Senate despises him. I despise him too. I think he is a lying, piece of trash that doesn't deserve to speak his mind because his mind doesn't exist. As for viewing him as a hero, he is nowhere close to being a hero. I guess being Republican and being a dimwit at the same time makes a hero. And by that definition, Ted Cruz is a hero. While everyone is entitled to their own opinion, they're not entitled to their own facts and the fact is that Ted Cruz amounts to nothing because what he brings to the table is an empty platter, much like what ever comes out that disgusting man's mouth.

Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:06 PM

Ted Cruz's impact on Texans and the Republican party.Cruz has inspired GOP candidates to rally for secession, rolling back immigration laws, impeaching President Obama, and amending the Constitutional direct election of Senators. People are following him and changing their views on certain things. This article also addresses the fact that Texas is becoming a more diverse state, with a fainter red part but not entirely blue part, making it a "purple state." 

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 18, 5:23 PM

The article establishes Ted Cruz as a controversial senator from Texas that has quickly gained the attention of most Americans, and explains the possible political changes in Texas due to Ted Cruz. It's interesting to see that he could possibly create a major political change in Texas, where the state goes from a firmly conservative and Republican state to more of a purple state. Cruz also could possibly spark a big change in the ideology of the Republican Party.

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BY 10/22 or 10/23 -- Inside the Bush, Cheney relationship

BY 10/22 or 10/23 -- Inside the Bush, Cheney relationship | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Peter Baker talks about his book, “Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House.” He calls the relationship between the duo, “one that drifted apart.”

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This video discusses the relationship between Bush in cheney and how it was not all as it seems and in their new book, Days of Fire, you can see that. All though they had their differences and grew distant they came together when needed. I think it was a nice video and good to hear a little behind the scenes of the truth of their relationship and how it wasnt all good.

 

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Maddy Folkerts's curator insight, October 25, 2013 9:28 PM

This video was about Baker's book about Bush & Cheney's relationship during Bush's presidency. They were close at first, then drifted apart. I thought it was interesting and a nice relief from the nonstop talk about ObamaCare and the government shutdown, etc.

Chris Buenaseda's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:14 PM

The video explains how Cheney was influential in Bush's decision-making, but less and less was he influential towards the end of Bush's 2nd term. This discussion was very interesting to watch as it painted Dick Cheney in another light, other than being the lackey to the younger Bush. Without Cheney's participation and adcive, Bush wouldn't have lasted the White House for past one term.

 

Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:28 PM

 This video is about bush and chaney while they where in the white house. It outlines the breaking and falling apart of their relationship and how bush really didn't have any power and chaney was the one really making the decisions, like a "puppet master". I think that their relationship as friends and as colleges was strained due to the media, the policy agenda and the war in Iraq.

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Senator Ted Cruz: Defund Obamacare or Shut Down Government, 27 March 2013

Senator Ted Cruz: Defund Obamacare or Shut Down Government, 27 March 2013 | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
“ Senator Ted Cruz wants to defund ObamaCare or defund the goverment.”
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Melissa Aleman's insight:
In the article, it states that the government is currently trying to figure out what they can do about the over spending in the nation. Cruz has been pitching and fighting for the idea to get rid of Obamacare because he thinks its the best thing to cut spending other than shutting down the government all together. He is trying to convince the Senate into following through with his idea and push them to a choice of either fight for obamacare or to keep the government up. I think that the pitch that Cruz is making is a good one. It should not have to come to the government shutting down and the Senate needs to stop with the "political games" and look at things from both sides. We should be trying to cut spending any way possible without having to shut down the government whether its adjusting the debt ceiling or defunding Obamacare.
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Sen. Ted Cruz: I Don't Think President Obama 'Has the Authority' to Order Syria Strike Without Congressional Approval

Sen. Ted Cruz: I Don't Think President Obama 'Has the Authority' to Order Syria Strike Without Congressional Approval | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Contradicting President Obama’s assertion, Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas said this morning on “This Week” that the president does not have the authority to order a military strike on Syria without Congressional approval.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

Very impressed by Cruz's points in the sense that he ctually HAS solutions and pitches to solving the problems other than striking Syria and killing innocent civilians on our watch and also getting our nation involved. After watching this I feel as though I might lean mainly toward the no intervention side because overall OUR national security comes first.

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Sammy Masri's curator insight, September 17, 2013 12:19 AM

Cruz spoke very well for the majority of the speech: he made a reasonable case about why an attack would not work. But he faltered on two points. One: The state of Texas, vast as though it may be, does not represent the United States. Two: It's almost become customary of Republicans to bring up Benghazi whenever possible. It happened, nothing short of a full-scale operation and the ability to see the future could have prevented it, let the American dead rest in peace.

 

Also, the longer you show the US not supporting innocent civilians, the more and more radical these "Islamic terrorists" will become. Cut to the chase - or in this case, a missile strike - and nip the thing in the bud before it grows too big.

Rachel Murphy's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:20 PM

Cruz makes it clear that he does not approve of military action in Syria. He believes a strike would aid rebel forces with links to Al-Qaeda. The strike may weaken Assad, but it would only give rebel forces an opportunity to swoop in. His precautions with the attack are plausible. I like the point he made about how OUR US military is not Al-Qaeda's air force. They are here to defend the United States.

Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:16 PM

This video shows how complicated this whole situation is, and I had no idea how opposed the public was to involvment in Syria. Is there is a way to reprimand him without a strike? War crimes need to be reprimanded, but does this mean we have to go to war? I was all for involvment, but now I'm really questioning whether that would be the right thing to do.

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3: Roundtable: Crucial week for Obama - Video on NBCNews.com

3: Roundtable: Crucial week for Obama - Video on NBCNews.com | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Video on msnbc.com: A Meet the Press roundtable forecasts the pressure on this upcoming week for the president to make his case for intervention in the Syrian conflict.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

Really enjoyed this video in the sense that it gave me more insight to what's going on and different points of view. Several points like the fact that innocent civilians will die on our watch because of the airstrike was one i especially liked because it made me think more deeply into why we shouldnt intervene. It's clear that this is a huge predicament that even the Round table finds difficult to choose a side in the sense that as a nation we are stuck on deciding whether to be or not to be the "world's policemen."

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Daniel Guo's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:49 PM

I think that Newt Gingrich brings up good points about why it's hard for the public to support an airstrike on Syria. I think that this dicussion is a fair representation of the current public opinion on the matter- nobody wants to directly support a strike; there is no clear right answer.

Joseph Rumbaut's comment, September 12, 2013 7:40 AM
Likewise, Gingrich is right to say that this foreign affair is inexplicable to the average American so if Obama was going to appeal to the average American he would have to build up to it and not just be blunt. Honestly though, after watching Obama's address, I feel like he should have mentioned diplomacy more instead of making it seem as if the only choices left were military action, military action, and military action.
Rachel Murphy's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:13 PM

All of the politicians here are hesitant about military strikes in Syria. because they aren't sure about the effect that it would cause. Newt Gingrich makes some excellent points about the importance of communication. I believe some action needs to be taken in Syria, but a strike would only unleash more problems for us. Syria's allies are too powerful. 

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Why Charity Can’t Replace the Safety Net

Why Charity Can’t Replace the Safety Net | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Conservatives like to argue that if we trim the social safety net, private charities will step in and tend to the needy. Paul Ryan—he of the soup kitchen photo-op—especially loves to extol the virtues of volunteers and philanthropy. So I was pleased to see this new piece in Democracy by...

Via Joel Leagans
Melissa Aleman's insight:

I agree with what the article is saying. You can't rely on charities when bad economic situations like recession hit. The power of the government is definitely greater and more dependable than that of charities. It acts as a back up when times go for the worst. Its not such a reassuring thing looking at history that charities will be there to donate when they need it most.

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Lauren Friederman's comment, April 7, 8:57 PM
While federal safety nets are important in America, private charity should be allowed to play a large role in helping the impoverished. Government welfare programs are necessary for some people to provide basic necessities, but I think that these programs shouldn't grow too large in scope. It is important for people to become self-reliant so they can contribute to society. I do agree, however, that private charity is not necessarily the answer to this growing poverty in America. We should not simply rely on the wealthy to fund the poor. The government, instead of offering handouts, should provide programs that help get these people who are struggling back into employment. Implementing programs that teach basic computer and interviewing skills could really give someone the boost they need to improve their own situation. Instead of expanding the welfare programs, the government should look at lowering the cost of college. That would give disadvantaged children the tool they need to pull themselves out of poverty. I agree that restructuring the welfare system so that it is the wealthy that provide for the poor would not be the answer. I do think that a restructure of the current welfare programs would be beneficial to the American people and economy.
Melissa Aleman's comment, April 8, 2:50 PM
I agree with what the article is saying. You can't rely on charities when bad economic situations like recession hit. The power of the government is definitely greater and more dependable than that of charities. It acts as a back up when times go for the worst. Its not such a reassuring thing looking at history that charities will be there to donate when they need it most.
Mayline Zhong's comment, May 21, 1:51 PM
Don't you think it's a bit idealistic to think that private charities alone could save our country? This article makes a lot of excellent points. If we are in a recession and the charities we are supposedly relying on also go bankrupt, what happens to us then? More people succumb to the recession, leading to more charities falling, which in turn results in more people suffering again. It's a never ending cycle. The only plausible solution would be to also have government aid for the needy that would act as an automatic stabilizer.
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Deal or no deal?

Deal or no deal? | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
IN HIS big annual speech to Congress, Barack Obama made several promises. He pledged to raise the minimum wage for those contracted to the federal government, to...

Via Joel Leagans
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Lauren Friederman's comment, February 16, 11:33 PM
This article uses the American public's reaction to the multitudinous promises to describe the state of the American government. The article describes how the division, empty promises, and inability to get along within the American government has made government shutdowns and dysfunction the norm. Obama's inability to encourage the political parties to work together has been one of his greatest weaknesses. The partisanship which he has either promoted or allowed has torn the government apart resulting in the embarrassing government shutdown over the debt ceiling that occurred last year. No one seems to have faith in the promises that Obama has made. His one major promise, the Affordable Care Act, was not implemented smoothly at all. It makes sense that people would be skeptical of the president's promises after what he has done so far. The question is: Do the American people deserve a president that they can believe in?;
Melissa Aleman's comment, February 17, 4:19 PM
Obama is definitely making some unlikely promises. Its hard to really say where we'll be, but Obama sure is putting a pretty optimistic image in the publics heads. If Obama isnt able to follow through with all these things that are getting Americans so worked up then he sure will be in a lot of trouble. With the tough grid lock we are in, it might be a lot harder than Obama thinks or is giving the impression that it is.
Stephanie Yard's comment, April 3, 10:10 AM
It seems to me that Obama continues to make promises and get the people hyped temporality, but ultimately not carry out his plans. For example, Obama’s healthcare sounds beneficial, yet only a little over 7 million people signed up out of the 314 million people in the US. That’s nothing to brag about. And increasing the minimum wage will increase the income of those who are employed, but also raise the cost to hire unskilled labor and ultimately reduce employment by businesses.
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Why the Republican Push for Black Voters Is (Mostly) Doomed to Fail

Why the Republican Push for Black Voters Is (Mostly) Doomed to Fail | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
As long as the GOP is pushing voter-ID laws that make it harder for African Americans to vote, the party's appeal to identity politics will come up short.

Via Joel Leagans
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Rabika Rehman's curator insight, April 8, 2:33 AM

This article is about how the GOP is finding new ways to turn African american into republicans. Apparently, GOP thinks what really matters is not the ideas but the skin color. But changing their views on early voting, voter ID, and the voting rights of ex-prisoners doesn't mean changing their stated ideals. 


Lauren Heim's curator insight, April 16, 10:36 PM

This deals with government and law by which republicans want more votes from African Americans. They want more votes to get into congress and to get things passed and to pretty much get what they want done not actually considering what african Americans want. Though it's stating their attempts are only making matters worse.

Abigail Beinborn's comment, April 19, 5:29 PM
I also think would make it worse. This was a good article that related well to government and law.
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BY 11/3 -- Is email ever private? Take a tour of the path traveled by your email

Video on msnbc.com: Critical questions are being raised about data safety in light of hacking reports and news about NSA data collection. NBC’s Stephanie Gosk explains what happens after you hit ‘send’ on an email message.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This video enlightens us in depth of the workings of email and how it is possible for others to view and who could possibly be watching where it goes. Suprisingly the data doesnt stay in the states but actually travels over seas. This video just re stated all that we know and gave more detail about the whole situation.

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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:27 PM

This video gives us insight on the exact detail of how email works, and who is watching and where it travels. You would assume the data is centralized in the US but the data centers over seas also help collect data. This video didn't really show anything we didn't already know, nor did it provide any special insight besides Google is working to encrypt their lines. 

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 25, 6:43 PM

This video shows us that it true when they say anything you put on the internet will be there forever, and many of us blow that off. I feel that we all need to be a little more mindful of what we say and do online, and we should keep a lot more private.

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 2, 11:53 PM

Lately there has been a lot of controversy over the government reading peoples phone txts emails social media phone calls ect. I think that the people have the right to privacy as stated in the constitution. 

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BY 10/31 -- NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say

BY 10/31 -- NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Agency positioned itself to collect from among millions of accounts, many belonging to Americans.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This discusses how public networks like Yahoo and Google are being tapped into by the NSA in order to provide security for Americans through access to lots of personal info. These networks have stated they do not want their databases to be tapped into by the NSA, but that is meerely just a claim. Although, both yahoo and google have started to make a move by encrypting their data in order to prevent any hacking. I think that this is going too far. What happened to privacy? Isn't that OUR right. The NSA is using the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to justify their recent moves and decisions.

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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:23 PM

NSA has secretly broken into the main communications link that connect yahoo and google data centers around the world. The company collects data from hundreds of millions accounts. This is not legal or constitutional, they should at least say something to us about this. They should not hide this. 

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 25, 5:02 PM

This article talks about the new program made by the NSA called MUSCULAR, which allows them to exploit data centers and flows from companies like Google and Yahoo. This article tells us about the negative feelings towards the federal government as overreaching its powers, the NSA says they only collect information on valid foreign targets, but who really knows.

Alex fowler's curator insight, February 3, 7:55 PM
I think that it is good for us to know what the government is doing but also it makes the USA look weak if one of our own is going and publishing private information that is vital to the security of the US. I think that on the otherhand i do not really want to know all of the spying that the government is doing i would rather not know if the gvt feels the need to infiltrate yahoo and goodle for information that they think could potentially harm the US then go ahead and do it but i think that again citizens have the rights to privacy and Snowden did a very couragous thing by standing up for the rights of the US citizens.
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BY 10/31 -- How the NSA is infiltrating private networks

BY 10/31 -- How the NSA is infiltrating private networks | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
The NSA, working with its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), secretly taps into the internal networks of Yahoo and Google, the two biggest Internet companies by overall data traffic.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

This article is about how the NSA  is going through private networks and how the NSA has been working with the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). They have been getting into google and yahoo networks; emails, docs, and yahoo emails. These can be looked into by the NSA and GCHQ. Their methods include taping google's private links, getting a third party who shares a major internet exhange with google, etc. This can be seen as quite scary for the reasons that they seem to be getting very good at it

  
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Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:12 PM

This article detailed exactly how the NSA has cracked into Google's data centers. The full repercussions of this scandalous news hack does not seem to fully register to the American public. The NSA has to be stopped and will not stop unless the American voters do something about it, whether it be through protest or voting in new representatives. It violates our constitutional rights.

Adriana Cruz's comment, January 25, 3:31 PM
This article talks about how the NSA has infiltrated into the public in order to ensure safety. For example, the NSA can monitor all Google Cloud actions. It is very interesting to note that the Washington Post is willing to share this information to the public; it almost seems risky. At the same time, it makes me feel very unsafe in that the government could monitor anything that I do online.
Alex fowler's curator insight, February 3, 7:52 PM
It is illegal to have a website that the gvt cannot get into but that does not mean that the gvt should tap into google or yahoos networks through wiring and invade peoples private information. It is against the rights of American citizens.
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BY 10/24 -- Rand Paul pushes constitutional amendment on Congress - Burgess Everett

BY 10/24 -- Rand Paul pushes constitutional amendment on Congress - Burgess Everett | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Forget the Vitter amendment. Rand Paul wants to make sure that Congress can’t ever again write laws with provisions specific to lawmakers.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

In this article, Rand Paul is pitching the idea to add an amendment that prohibits Congress from passing laws that Congress is exempt from and having to dealin with lawmakers. Its clearly aimed at Obamacare for the reasons that when it is in action, exchanges must be made by the congressmen and rulings from the O.P.M. in order to receive federal contributions. It is unlikely that Congress will go for more restrictions.

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Stephina Philip's curator insight, October 29, 2013 10:25 PM

 This article is about Rand Paul, Republican, the senator of Kentucky pushing for an amendment where he wants the congressmen to not write laws with provisions specific to  lawmakers. It aims at Obamacare . It requires all 3 branches and their involvement.

Being a republican and againnst obamacare, Sen. Rand Paul wants a amendment that asks for the congress to not pass a law that applies to the citizen but excludes the congress. His target is Obamacare and specifically at the Supreme court Justice John Roberts who proved the Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. 

Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 7:53 PM

A kentucky senator, Rand Paul, wants an amendment forbidding senators and representatives to pass laws that don't apply equally to Congress and the citizens. Specifically aimed at Obamacare, this amendment will force lawmakers to disclose exchanges and rulings from the Office of Personnel Management in order to receive federal employer contributions. Amending the Constitution requires a majority vote in both chambers before it can be ratified, and I think Paul has a difficult task ahead of him to convince lawmakers to give up their authority to make laws.

Adriana Cruz's curator insight, January 20, 11:54 PM

This article tells us that Rand Paul wants an amendment forbidding senators and representatives to pass laws that don't apply equally to Congress and the citizens. Paul specifically aims this at Obamacare, his proposed amendment will force lawmakers to disclose exchanges and rulings from the Office of Personnel Management in order to receive federal employer contributions. It seems Paul has a difficult task ahead of him to convince lawmakers to give up their authority to make laws because amending the Constitution requires a majority vote in both chambers before it can be ratified.

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Marco Rubio: I’ll Vote To Shut Down The Government Unless Obamacare Is Completely Defunded

Marco Rubio: I’ll Vote To Shut Down The Government Unless Obamacare Is Completely Defunded | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
“ During an interview on conservative host Hugh Hewitt’s talk radio program Thursday night, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) joined fellow Tea Party favorites Sens.”
Via Terrance H BoothSr
Melissa Aleman's insight:
In this article, Marco Rubio has now stated that he backs the movement Ted Cruz is trying to make that Obamacare needs to go. I think that Cruz and Rubio are on the right idea and that its obvious that Obamacare is not going well or going to go well for the economy and it needs to go. The government needs to stop being stubborn and come to grips that the Republicans will not stop to get Obamacare out even if it takes voting to shut the government down.
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Why America Is Saying 'No': @peggynoonannyc on Obama and Syria

Why America Is Saying 'No': @peggynoonannyc on Obama and Syria | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Syria and Obama: Wrong time, wrong place, wrong plan, wrong man, argues Peggy Noonan.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

I thouroughly enjoyed this article because Noonan had very STRONG points that I agreed with. This helped me decide that I do believe that the military strike is probably not the best solution. Noonan brought up a good point that no one should question our power as America and no one is because it is very known that we are a strong nation. So that shouldnt be a reason at all for taking the strike. 

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Will Levine's comment, September 11, 2013 12:34 AM
This country's response was very good in my opinion in the respect that the majority of us do not want to go to war with Syria and activate our military action. Obama seems to be not fully clear on how to deal with the situation although I admire his decision in not going to war and to do this in a peaceful way.
Will Levine's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:35 AM

This country's response was very good in my opinion in the respect that the majority of us do not want to go to war with Syria and activate our military action. Obama seems to be not fully clear on how to deal with the situation although I admire his decision in not going to war and to do this in a peaceful way.

carlosdgarcia's curator insight, September 11, 2013 10:16 PM

Noonan is right. There is no need for a military intervention. There is nothing to prove, it won't do anything besides have American causalties. Something DOES need to be done though, and the best thing could possibly be what the pope said. Punish Assad and whoever else allowed the chemical weapons to be used. And who cares what Iran and North Korea think. Let them judge.

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Video: Denis McDonough: 'Outraged' at Ted Cruz's Al Qaeda comments

Video: Denis McDonough: 'Outraged' at Ted Cruz's Al Qaeda comments | M Almond AP GOV | Scoop.it
Denis McDonough, in an interview on ABC's 'This Week' said he was 'outraged' at Ted Cruz's comments that our forces would be serving as 'Al Qaeda's air force.' The interview was immediately followed by one with Sen.

Via Teresa Herrin
Melissa Aleman's insight:

Of course when using the name Al Qaeda in the same sentence as ally and America, most would be outraged to the sound of that. Although Cruz said tha,t I feel that he didnt necessarily mean it whole heartedly but in the sense to catch the attention of the public and prove his point. Maybe Ted Cruz shouldnt have said that in the sense that now people will probably focus on him saying that more than his point he's trying to make, but even if he didnt say that I kinda lean toward Cruz's side in that we shouldn't get involved.

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Sammy Masri's curator insight, September 17, 2013 12:25 AM

30 seconds of generalized response isn't much to go on, and McDonough's statement showed it. Rather than namby-pamby about the issue, everyone needs to grab their fears by the horns are realize: "Yes, we will possibly be helping some groups that are maybe connected to Al-Qaeda. But in the meantime, we can help a whole country of civilians, who, when pressed, will vote for the more reasonable members of the rebels, IF the US helps in time."

 

No more of this "small, calculated, concise" strike nonsense.

Tianna Kelly's curator insight, December 1, 2013 9:02 PM

My initial reacton to Senator Cruz's was similar to McDonough's; Cruz's statement was clearly crafted to be sensational and make headlines. Although I am not a fan of potential United States military action in Syria, Cruz's comments were purposefully disrespectful and, as McDonough iterated, "outrageous".

Paulina Ho's curator insight, December 19, 2013 7:35 PM

It seems very normal and typical for hte Chief of Staff to assure the public that there will be no boots on the ground, but I believe that no amount of assurance that this will be no Libya or Afghanistan, will persuade the American public to join this war.