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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
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Th2 Cytokines Inhibit Lymphangiogenesis

Th2 Cytokines Inhibit Lymphangiogenesis | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
by Ira L. Savetsky, Swapna Ghanta, Jason C. Gardenier, Jeremy S. Torrisi, Gabriela D. García Nores, Geoffrey E. Hespe, Matthew D. Nitti, Raghu P. Kataru, Babak J.

 

Abstract

 

Lymphangiogenesis is the process by which new lymphatic vessels grow in response to pathologic stimuli such as wound healing, inflammation, and tumor metastasis. It is well-recognized that growth factors and cytokines regulate lymphangiogenesis by promoting or inhibiting lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) proliferation, migration and differentiation. Our group has shown that the expression of T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines is markedly increased in lymphedema, and that these cytokines inhibit lymphatic function by increasing fibrosis and promoting changes in the extracellular matrix. However, while the evidence supporting a role for T cells and Th2 cytokines as negative regulators of lymphatic function is clear, the direct effects of Th2 cytokines on isolated LECs remains poorly understood. Using in vitroand in vivo studies, we show that physiologic doses of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) have profound anti-lymphangiogenic effects and potently impair LEC survival, proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. Inhibition of these cytokines with targeted monoclonal antibodies in the cornea suture model specifically increases inflammatory lymphangiogenesis without concomitant changes in angiogenesis. These findings suggest that manipulation of anti-lymphangiogenic pathways may represent a novel and potent means of improving lymphangiogenesis.


Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, June 4, 2015 11:30 AM

Citation: Savetsky IL, Ghanta S, Gardenier JC, Torrisi JS, García Nores GD, Hespe GE, et al. (2015) Th2 Cytokines Inhibit Lymphangiogenesis. PLoS ONE 10(6): e0126908. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0126908

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments
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Acupuncture for Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Treatment

Acupuncture Today is a leading provider of acupuncture and oriental medicine news, info and research information in the world

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:34 AM

A study reported in "Acupuncture in Medicine" shows that acupuncture and topical herbs have the potential to clinically cure 44 percent and positively affect 52 percent of lymphedema cases when used together for 12 weeks. Acupuncture appears safe and may reduce lymphedema associated with breast cancer treatments.

Lymphedema is an abnormal buildup of lymph fluid that causes swelling and sometimes pain. It is a common complaint of male and female breast cancer patients following surgery. The likelihood of developing lymphedema increases with more extensive surgery, increased number of lymph nodes removed, and amount of radiation therapy to the axilla following surgery.

Natalie Palmer's curator insight, August 15, 2013 8:48 AM

This is interesting and beneficial information since lymphedema can be a painful challenge for many.

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Act with Love Blog | Breast Cancer Survivors, We Need Your Input!

Act with Love Blog | Breast Cancer Survivors, We Need Your Input! | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"We are soliciting your suggestions regarding side effects from your surgical, radiation, hormonal and/or chemotherapy and targeted therapy.  Although physicians and researchers have developed questionnaires in the past, there has never, to my knowledge, been a questionnaire developed by those who experience the problems.  We are interested to learn about any symptoms or side effects that you have experienced related to your treatment, including joint pain, chemobrain, lymphedema, numbness, pain in the chest wall, sexual problems, and anything else that you’ve noticed.  This is our chance to document what you are experiencing rather than just what the doctors THINK you are experiencing."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:21 PM

"If you want to help, first make sure you have joined HOW. They ask that you email at how@dslrf.org.  It will help if you can, as in the game show Jeopardy!, put your response in the form of a question rather than a paragraph describing what you went through.  For example, “Is it normal to keep forgetting things that were so easy to remember before my breast cancer?”  or “Will the numbness in my toes ever go away?”  Remember they will have the information about your health and cancer treatment from previous HOW questionnaires, so you don’t need to repeat it."

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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NEW SUPPORT FOR BREAST CANCER PATIENTS AVAILABLE THROUGH FINANCIAL GRANT PROGRAM

NEW SUPPORT FOR BREAST CANCER PATIENTS AVAILABLE THROUGH FINANCIAL GRANT PROGRAM | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"The Patient Advocate Foundation is pleased to announce the launch of a new program within PAF's patient service programs.

Financially and medically qualified patients may use the one-time grant of $300 to cover expenses for lymphedema care and supplies, durable medical equipment, transportation costs associated with getting to and from treatment, prosthesis and wigs, or childcare and/or eldercare necessitated by treatment."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:10 PM

To apply, patients should call the Financial Aid Fund division of PAF at (855) 824-7941. Additional details of this program can be found at www.patientadvocate.org/gethelp.

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Extensiveness of breast cancer surgery linked to risk of lymphedema

Extensiveness of breast cancer surgery linked to risk of lymphedema | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Breast cancer survivors who have extensive surgery are four times more likely to develop arm lymphedema. According to a new study, the extensiveness of surgery to treat breast cancer proportionately increases the risk of developing the debilitating disorder.

According to the lead author, Tracey DiSipio, PhD, from Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, women who had undergone an axillary lymph node dissection, which is an invasive surgery to remove lymph nodes under the arm, were four times more likely to experience swollen or disfigured arms compared with women who had received a sentinel lymph node biopsy."


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Preventing post-surgical problems for breast cancer patients :: WRAL.com

Preventing post-surgical problems for breast cancer patients :: WRAL.com | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
Women who undergo breast cancer surgery can often experience uncomfortable swelling associated with lymphedema, but a new device is helping catch the symptoms earlier, allowing doctors to begin preventative care soon after surgery.

Via Susan Zager
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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Patients\' Fear Of Developing Lymphedema Far Exceeds Risk Following Breast Cancer Treatment

Patients\' Fear Of Developing Lymphedema Far Exceeds Risk Following Breast Cancer Treatment | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
Women who have had the lymph nodes under their arm surgically removed during breast cancer treatment are warned to avoid certain practices that can cause lymphedema - a condition that causes chro

Via Susan Zager
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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Axillary Radiotherapy Gives Good Local Control, Lowers Lymphedema Rates in Node-Positive Breast Cancer

Axillary Radiotherapy Gives Good Local Control, Lowers Lymphedema Rates in Node-Positive Breast Cancer | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy both provide good locoregional control for patients with breast cancer with a positive axillary sentinel node, but the lower rate of lymphedema associated with radiotherapy should make it the standard treatment for these patients, according to results from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer AMAROS trial.

“We all know that axillary lymph node dissection is associated with high rates of side effects,” said Emiel J.T. Rutgers, MD, PhD, of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, during an Oral Abstract Session on Monday. “And axillary radiotherapy is associated with good regional control and limited side effects in a couple of small studies.”

The AMAROS study tested radiotherapy versus dissection in women with a positive sentinel lymph node; patients who had previous axillary treatment of any type or a prior malignancy were excluded from the trial. In total, 4,806 patients were included, 1,425 of whom (29.7%) had a positive axillary sentinel node. In the intent-to-treat protocol, 744 patients were randomly assigned to undergo dissection and 681 were randomly assigned to undergo axillary radiotherapy. Approximately 85% of patients in each group ultimately received the treatment to which they were assigned."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 4, 2013 10:17 AM

For the abstract go to: http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/content/109779-132


According to the article:

"Tari A. King, MD, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Discussant for the session, noted that the ACOSOG Z0011 trial found no improvement in regional control with lymph node dissection versus sentinel lymph node biopsy alone, and no effect on survival. The AMAROS trial now suggests that radiotherapy can offer similar results to dissection, together with an important reduction in lymphedema. She added that although some may criticize the study for being underpowered, the low rate of events represents the interplay between local and systemic therapy.  "

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Genetic Markers Linked To the Development of Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors | ucsf.edu

Genetic Markers Linked To the Development of Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors | ucsf.edu | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"The researchers also learned that the risks of developing lymphedema increased significantly for women who had more advanced breast cancer at the time of diagnosis, more lymph nodes removed or a significantly higher body mass index.

 

Bradley Aouizerat, PhD

The study is the first to evaluate genetic predictors of lymphedema in a large group of women using a type of technology, bioimpedance spectroscopy, to measure increases in fluid in the arm. Bioimpedance spectroscopy is a noninvasive procedure that allows one to measure body composition including an increase in fluid in an arm or a leg."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 19, 2013 7:27 AM

"The researchers found that women with lymphedema had:

  • More advanced breast cancer at the time of diagnosis;
  • A higher number of positive lymph nodes;
  • Were more likely to have a significantly higher body mass index.
  • The authors also found associations between lymphedema and four genes known to play a role in the development of lymphedema."
Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Exercise Can Improve Survivors' Quality of Life

Exercise Can Improve Survivors' Quality of Life | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"At one time, women with breast cancer, especially in the advanced stages, were often told by their doctor to rest and limit their exercise. But newer research has shown that exercise is not only safe and possible during and after breast cancer treatment, but that it also can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life.

Studies of breast cancer survivors have shown that regular exercise significantly improves physical functioning and reduces fatigue. Certain kinds of exercise appear to help breast cancer survivors at high risk for arm, breast and chest swelling (lymphedema) avoid the condition. And some types of exercise can improve symptoms for those who already have it. "Click here to edit the title


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 2, 2013 3:09 PM

This article is great for those who want to exercise before, during, and/or after breast cancer treatment.

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Black Women Less Likely to Get Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and More Likely to Have Lymphedema on Axillary Lymph Node Dissection

Black Women Less Likely to Get Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and More Likely to Have Lymphedema on Axillary Lymph Node Dissection | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Although sentinel lymph node biopsy is the recommended method for axillary staging of node-negative breast cancer, racial disparities in access to care were found in a study presented at the 2012 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Black women were 12% less likely than white women with breast cancer to receive sentinel lymph node biopsy for axillary staging. Additionally, black women were twice as likely as white women to develop lymphedema when undergoing axillary lymph node dissection compared to patients having a sentinel node biopsy, the study found."


Via Susan Zager
Rebecca Boomershine's insight:

a greater focus to this population and educated on the risk factors of Lymphedema. Also should have access to RTW garments that match skin tone. 

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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Axillary Radiotherapy Gives Good Local Control, Lowers Lymphedema Rates in Node-Positive Breast Cancer

Axillary Radiotherapy Gives Good Local Control, Lowers Lymphedema Rates in Node-Positive Breast Cancer | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy both provide good locoregional control for patients with breast cancer with a positive axillary sentinel node, but the lower rate of lymphedema associated with radiotherapy should make it the standard treatment for these patients, according to results from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer AMAROS trial.

“We all know that axillary lymph node dissection is associated with high rates of side effects,” said Emiel J.T. Rutgers, MD, PhD, of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, during an Oral Abstract Session on Monday. “And axillary radiotherapy is associated with good regional control and limited side effects in a couple of small studies.”

The AMAROS study tested radiotherapy versus dissection in women with a positive sentinel lymph node; patients who had previous axillary treatment of any type or a prior malignancy were excluded from the trial. In total, 4,806 patients were included, 1,425 of whom (29.7%) had a positive axillary sentinel node. In the intent-to-treat protocol, 744 patients were randomly assigned to undergo dissection and 681 were randomly assigned to undergo axillary radiotherapy. Approximately 85% of patients in each group ultimately received the treatment to which they were assigned."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 4, 2013 10:17 AM

For the abstract go to: http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/content/109779-132


According to the article:

"Tari A. King, MD, of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Discussant for the session, noted that the ACOSOG Z0011 trial found no improvement in regional control with lymph node dissection versus sentinel lymph node biopsy alone, and no effect on survival. The AMAROS trial now suggests that radiotherapy can offer similar results to dissection, together with an important reduction in lymphedema. She added that although some may criticize the study for being underpowered, the low rate of events represents the interplay between local and systemic therapy.  "

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Less Lymphedema with Axillary Radiotherapy than Node Dissection, but Comparable Disease Control : ASCO 2013

Less Lymphedema with Axillary Radiotherapy than Node Dissection, but Comparable Disease Control : ASCO 2013 | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"A European phase III clinical trial found that lymphedema was twice as common among women with sentinel lymph node–positive early breast cancer who had axillary lymph node dissection compared to those who had axillary radiotherapy. Overall and disease-free survival 5 years after treatment were equivalent.

This study suggests that for patients who need axillary lymph node treatment, axillary radiotherapy is a good alternative to axillary lymph node dissection and can reduce the risk of lymphedema, without diminishing patients’ survival. Axillary radiotherapy can be combined with radiotherapy received by women who have chosen breast conservation surgery."

 


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 10, 2013 2:14 PM

To see the abstract to this study go to: http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/content/109779-132

The conlusion of the study was as follows:

"ALND (Axilary Lymph Node Dissection) and ART (Axillary radiotherapy) after a positive SNB provide excellent and comparable regional control. ART reduces the risk of short-term and long-term lymphedema compared to ALND." There was no differnece in the QOL (quality of life). The study seemed to point out even though there were no difference in QOL the ART seemed to have less cases of lymphadema. Since this is more common in Europe, I think there needs to be more study and I will be interested to see if it is looked into more in America.

Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Innovative Technique Seeks to Prevent Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients

Innovative Technique Seeks to Prevent Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"A team of surgeons and members of the breast cancer program of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center is conducting a two-year pilot study of an innovative microsurgery technique coupled with imaging technology to not only prevent lymphedema but also potentially detect and treat it early.

Lymphedema, the accumulation of lymph fluid in the arm and painful swelling due to blocked lymph drainage, occurs in up to 13 percent of breast cancer patients after sentinel node biopsy and external-beam radiation, increasing to 40 percent following complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and radiation."

 

 


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, August 1, 2013 2:52 PM

According to the article:


"The LYMPHA technique creates a bypass to restore lymphatic flow by connecting lymph vessels to a branch of the axillary vein, a pathway normally severed by node removal or blocked by tissue fibrosis resulting from radiation, says Dr. Feldman, chief of the Division of Breast Surgery and the Vivian L. Milstein Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

Previous techniques for preserving lymphatic flow were lengthy and complex, and surgeons could not predict which patients would develop lymphedema or benefit from intervention. The LYMPHA bypass adds only 20–30 minutes to breast cancer surgery and ALND. “In addition to removing all potentially cancerous lymph nodes, we can now restore lymphatic flow and reduce the patient’s risk of developing lymphedema,” says Dr. Feldman."


To be considered for the study, breast cancer patients needing lymph node dissection should contact Amiya Vaz at 212-305-1317 or by email at: av2454(at)columbia(dot)edu.

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Las Vegas Man Lived With 132-Pound Scrotum For Four Years

Las Vegas Man Lived With 132-Pound Scrotum For Four Years | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
Wesley Warren suffered from a condition known as scrotal lymphedema.
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The future of doctor-patient relationships

The future of doctor-patient relationships | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
When combined with private social networking for healthcare, mobile apps for doctor-patients relationship management, become a tremendous force multiplier for care teams in low-income developing countries that have high levels of mobile penetration...

 

(...) "Mobile apps enable small numbers of doctors to provide quality healthcare to large numbers of patient where the key success factor is not the latest in nuclear medicine cardiac scanning technology but a cheap, simple and immediately accessible digital communications channel for a doctor to talk to patients and rescue workers to cope with diaster operations and management.


Healthcare delivery is cheap – because we eliminate the cost of coming to the office and we make the most of mobile and private networking technology without having to carry the cross of electronic medical records and government mandated data sharing.


When a nurse, or paramedic or specialist has the time to explain things, patients feel respected when they remember the encounter as a positive experience and are more likely to take the nurse/paramedic/physician advice. Sure – it’s best done face-to-face – but when the only option is a phone call or a private message or sharing guidance in a private group for lymphedema patients and caregivers – digital channels are a winner."


Via Camilo Erazo
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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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Microvascular filtration is increased in the forearms of patients with breast cancer–related lymphedema

Microvascular filtration is increased in the forearms of patients with breast cancer–related lymphedema | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL) is a frequent and debilitating complication of breast cancer treatment. The pathophysiology is complex and remains poorly understood;.."


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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science
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Understanding Lymphedema - a new Online Continuing Education Course for ... - DigitalJournal.com (press release)

Understanding Lymphedema - a new Online Continuing Education Course for ...DigitalJournal.com (press release)These basic knowledge and skills are not usually taught in medical programs, nursing programs, physical therapy programs, or occupational...


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Blood test may allow for early diagnosis of lymphedema

Blood test may allow for early diagnosis of lymphedema | Lymphedma | Scoop.it
A set of proteins circulating in blood may flag the presence of lymphedema, which is difficult to diagnose before the onset of physical symptoms.

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Lymph Node Surgery

Lymph Node Surgery | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"In contrast to rapid developments in the treatment of cancer, the treatment of lymphedema has not changed significantly over the last century.  More recently, microsurgical transfer of lymph nodes from the groin or axilla to the affected limb has been receiving increased attention in the treatment of lymphedema.  While this technique has been used abroad with reported success, there is a lack of prospective data and rigorous evaluation of outcomes which has limited its widespread use.  However, we have seen first hand the improvement of lymphedema in our patients following this procedure with long-term follow-up."


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Rescooped by Rebecca Boomershine from Breast Cancer News
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CureToday.com: News Archives - Acupuncture eases lymphedema in breast cancer patients: pilot study

CureToday.com: News Archives - Acupuncture eases lymphedema in breast cancer patients: pilot study | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"Acupuncture significantly reduced limb circumference in patients with breast-cancer-related lymphedema, in a new pilot study published in Cancer.

"We now have an intervention that will actually control lymphedema," lead author Dr. Barrie Cassileth of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer in New York City told Reuters Health. "There isn't any other intervention at this point in time that reduces arm circumference in a safe, inexpensive way.""


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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 20, 2013 11:21 AM

Acupuncture can help with lymhadema. It works to help patients with many side effects, depending on the patient. It's a great tool to have.

Shaftesbury Clinic's curator insight, May 21, 2013 6:11 AM

Acupuncture can be a very helpful treatment alongside conventional care, which may help patients to cope with and manage their symptoms.

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Lymphedema: Early Detection Valuable, But Methods Debated : Oncology Times

Lymphedema: Early Detection Valuable, But Methods Debated : Oncology Times | Lymphedma | Scoop.it

"While the risk of lymphedema after breast cancer surgery may be less today than in the past due to the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy, the problem is still a chronic, disabling condition for many breast cancer survivors."


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