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Sharing Hub: Living Well with Lung Cancer

Sharing Hub: Living Well with Lung Cancer | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Find valuable Lung Cancer resources and information to share with your communities.
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Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS): Provide coverage for Lung Cancer Screening with LDCT

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS): Provide coverage for Lung Cancer Screening with LDCT | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Screening for lung cancer with low dose CT scans (LDCT) can save thousands of lives every year. Many private health insurers already provide coverage...
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Sign the petition please! 

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Help Make Hope Happen « LUNGevity Foundation

Help Make Hope Happen «  LUNGevity Foundation | LungCancer | Scoop.it
By Sue Bersh Five years ago I held my best friend’s hand and watched her take her last breath. For the 2-1/2 years leading up to that moment, I watched
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Bristol plans big lung cancer study, pairing immunotherapies - Reuters

Bristol plans big lung cancer study, pairing immunotherapies Reuters (Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co on Tuesday said it plans this year to begin a late-stage trial testing whether a combination of two of its high-profile immunotherapies can...
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Molecular Targeted Agents and Biologic Therapies for Lung Ca... : Journal of Thoracic Oncology

Molecular Targeted Agents and Biologic Therapies for Lung Ca... : Journal of Thoracic Oncology | LungCancer | Scoop.it

"Tabulated below are “targeted” or novel agents that are being or have been evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. Only compounds that have entered clinical trials have been listed. The compounds are listed by class, and within each class, they are listed in the order of their phase of clinical development, with those in the latest phase being listed first"


Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, March 17, 2013 12:55 PM

Excellent resource for the current status of targeted therapies in NSCLC

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Ex-Google health chief launches an online community for cancer patients

Ex-Google health chief launches an online community for cancer patients | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Google's former lead health strategist has launched a new website, SmartPatients, which helps cancer patients connect with each other, and learn more about their disease.

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High-Risk Human Papillomavirus-Positive Lung Cancer: Molecular Evidence for a Pattern of Pulmonary Metastasis

Infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (hrHPV) is associated with cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancers. Since a causal contribution of hrHPV infection to lung cancer (LC) is still a matter of debate, a comprehensive study was performed to delineate hrHPV involvement in LC.

 

hrHPV presence in a tumor with primary presentation in the lungs signifies pulmonary metastasis from a primary hrHPV-positive cancer elsewhere in the body. No support was found for an attribution of hrHPV infection to the development of primary LC.

 


Via Cancer Commons, Katie Brown
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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:04 PM

van Boerdonk RA, Daniels JM ... Snijders PJ, Hei, J Thorac Oncol, Apr 8, 2013

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Dr. Natasha Leighl’s Highlights in Lung Cancer, 2012, Parts 1 and 2: New Options for Patients with EGFR Mutations, ALK and ROS1 Rearrangements « LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog

Dr. Natasha Leighl’s Highlights in Lung Cancer, 2012, Parts 1 and 2: New Options for Patients with EGFR Mutations, ALK and ROS1 Rearrangements «  LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Here are the first two podcasts from Dr. Natasha Leighl's webinar on "Highlights in Lung Cancer from 2012". Dr. Leighl is a longtime friend who is a lung cancer
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Maintenance Therapy: Many Interpretations of the Leading Options « LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog

Maintenance Therapy: Many Interpretations of the Leading Options «  LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog | LungCancer | Scoop.it
As explained by several leading experts around the US, here are the leading options for patients who have completed first line doublet chemotherapy without demo
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Response to Cabozantinib in Patients with RET Fusion-Positive Lung Adenocarcinomas

"The discovery of RET fusions in lung cancers has uncovered a new therapeutic target for patients whose tumors harbor these changes. In an unselected population of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), RET fusions are present in 1-2% of cases. This incidence rises substantially, however, in never-smokers with lung adenocarcinomas that lack other known driver oncogenes. While pre-clinical data provide experimental support for the use of RET inhibitors in the treatment of RET fusion-positive tumors, clinical data on response are lacking. We report preliminary data for the first three patients treated with the RET inhibitor cabozantinib on a prospective phase 2 trial for patients with RET fusion-positive NSCLCs (NCT01639508)..."


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 2013 5:11 PM

Drilon AWang LHasanovic A, et al. Cancer Discov. Mar 26, 2013.

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FDA seeks to fast track Novartis lung cancer drug

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has designated a compound developed by Novartis AG to treat a type of non-small cell lung cancer for fast-track development and review, the Swiss drugmaker said on Friday."


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:37 PM

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mar 15, 2013.

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LKB1 Inactivation Dictates Therapeutic Response of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer to the Metabolism Drug Phenformin

"The LKB1 (also called STK11) tumor suppressor is mutationally inactivated in ∼20% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). LKB1 is the major upstream kinase activating the energy-sensing kinase AMPK, making LKB1-deficient cells unable to appropriately sense metabolic stress. We tested the therapeutic potential of metabolic drugs in NSCLC and identified phenformin, a mitochondrial inhibitor and analog of the diabetes therapeutic metformin, as selectively inducing apoptosis in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. Therapeutic trials in Kras-dependent mouse models of NSCLC revealed that tumors with Kras and Lkb1 mutations, but not those with Kras and p53 mutations, showed selective response to phenformin as a single agent, resulting in prolonged survival. This study suggests phenformin as a cancer metabolism-based therapeutic to selectively target LKB1-deficient tumors."


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 9, 2013 1:19 PM

Shackelford DB, Abt E ... Mischel PS, Shaw RJ. Cancer Cell. Jan 24, 2013

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Call for help from single mum - ABC Far North Qld - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Call for help from single mum - ABC Far North Qld - Australian Broadcasting Corporation | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Aubrey Anderson is a 30-year-old single mum with a 14-week-old baby and like all parents she just wants to watch that baby grow, but because of a tumour in her lung behind her heart, doctors say that's unlikely.
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LUNGevity Hero: Doug Kammerer « LUNGevity Foundation

LUNGevity Hero: Doug Kammerer «  LUNGevity Foundation | LungCancer | Scoop.it
It is with great excitement that we launch our monthly LUNGevity Hero spotlight to honor some of our most important allies in our fight against lung cancer.  L
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A breathalyzer to detect lung cancer?

A breathalyzer to detect lung cancer? | LungCancer | Scoop.it

Early detection of lung cancer can improve prognosis of the disease. Thus, British researchers are working on developing a test that can pick up early traits of the disease, making cure more likely.

A team of experts at the University of Huddersfield are developing a breathalyzer test that can detect very early signs of the malignancy.


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Single mum, new born baby, lung cancer - ABC Local

Single mum, new born baby, lung cancer - ABC Local | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Single mum, new born baby, lung cancer ABC Local Aubrey Anderson is a 30-year-old single mum with a 14-week-old baby and like all parents she just wants to watch that baby grow, but because of a tumour in her lung behind her heart, doctors say...
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Q&A with Mark Socinski, MD, on the POINTBREAK Trial of Maintenance Therapy for NSCLC - Chemotherapy Advisor

Q&A with Mark Socinski, MD, on the POINTBREAK Trial of Maintenance Therapy for NSCLC - Chemotherapy Advisor | LungCancer | Scoop.it
Editorial Advisory Board member Dr. Socinski discusses the key clinical insights brought to light by the POINTBREAK trial, presented at the 2012 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

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Brian Shields's curator insight, March 18, 2013 6:10 PM

Nice update on an important trial.

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Lessons Learned From Lung Cancer Genomics: The Emerging Concept of Individualized Diagnostics and Treatment

The advent of novel therapeutics that specifically target signaling pathways activated by genetic alterations has revolutionized the way patients with lung cancer are treated. Here, we have summarized these developments into six conceptual paradigms that illustrate the transition from empirical cancer medicine to mechanistically based individualized oncology.

 


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 18, 2013 11:02 AM

Buettner R, Wolf J, Thomas RK. J Clin Oncol. Apr 15, 2013.

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LUNGevity offers the largest online network of support for all people affected by lung cancer. - LUNGevity Foundation

LUNGevity offers the largest online network of support for all people affected by lung cancer. - LUNGevity Foundation | LungCancer | Scoop.it
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I Want to Fight My Lung Cancer: What Should My Diet Be, and What About Supplements? « LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog

I Want to Fight My Lung Cancer: What Should My Diet Be, and What About Supplements? «  LUNGevity Foundation Expert Blog | LungCancer | Scoop.it
The question of what and how to eat is one of the most common ones patients and caregivers have about how to manage cancer, and that's understandable: we want t
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Thankful for Early Detection « LUNGevity Foundation

Thankful for Early Detection «  LUNGevity Foundation | LungCancer | Scoop.it
On March 24, 2005, at 46 years old, I was diagnosed with Non-Small Cell Adenocarcinoma Lung Cancer. There were no symptoms. Because of chest pain on my right si
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KRAS Mutation as the Biomarker of Response to Chemotherapy and EGFR-TKIs in Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Clues For Its Potential Use in Second-Line Therapy Decision Making

"In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), knowledge of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status is fundamental for selecting the treatment involving EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). Little information is available regarding the response and progression-free survival (PFS) in platinum-based chemotherapy (CT) versus EGFR-TKIs in the presence or absence of KRAS mutation, particularly in patients without EGFR mutation..."


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 2013 1:47 PM

Campos-Parra AD, Zuloaga C, Manríquez ME, Avilés A, et al. Am J Clin Oncol. Mar 28, 2013.

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Mice with up to 200 tumors completely cured of lung cancer using a gene therapy inhibiting c-myc

Mice with up to 200 tumors completely cured of lung cancer using a gene therapy inhibiting c-myc | LungCancer | Scoop.it

Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) scientists eradicate lung tumours in a pre-clinical mouse model. Previous studies had already shown that Myc was a key protein in tumour development and had established how to inhibit Myc through gene therapy. The protein Myc is involved in the development of diverse tumours and so Myc-targeted therapy could make a positive contribution to the therapeutic options for different types of cancer.

 

The study has managed to eliminate mouse lung tumours by inhibiting Myc, a protein that plays a key role in the development of many different tumours. The results, published in the journal Genes & Development, confirm that repeated, long-term treatment does not cause side effects. Even more importantly, no resistance to treatment has been encountered, which is one of the biggest concerns with anticancer therapies. These results show that anticancer therapies based on Myc inhibition are a safe, effective therapeutic option in new drug development.

 

Myc is a protein that plays a big role in regulating gene transcription and it is involved in cell processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (programmed cell death - an essential part of regenerating tissues and eliminating damaged cells). It acts as a regulator gene that controls the expression of some 15% of human genes. However, imbalances in this protein bring about uncontrolled cell growth which in turn can lead to the onset of cancer in different tissues. In fact, deregulated Myc is found in most tumours, including cervical, breast, colon, lung and stomach cancer.

 

The work conducted by the Mouse Models of Cancer Therapy group at the VHIO, led by Dr Laura Soucek, shows that Myc can be controlled and inhibited through a mutant called Omomyc that hijacks Myc and prevents it from acting. “Even if we clearly identify a mechanism behind tumour development, it is still extremely complex to pinpoint how to intervene in cells' internal machinery or modify genetic processes,” explained Dr Soucek. “We have found a way to inhibit Myc through Omomyc,” she continued. “We induced Omomyc expression in mice through gene therapy and managed to activate and deactivate it by administering an antibiotic to the mice in their drinking water.”

 

In the study, multiple lung tumours were induced in the mouse (up to 200 tumours in each individual) and Myc inhibition episodes were achieved by activating Omomyc expression for 4-weeks, followed by 4-week rest periods. This therapy - known as metronomic therapy - was maintained for more than a year, regularly checking tumour progress in each mouse. All mice became tumour free after the first inhibition period, but 63% of cases then relapsed. After the second Myc inhibition period, only 11% of the initial tumours reappeared. According to Dr Soucek, “the most important finding was that there were no signs of resistance to treatment. This is one of the biggest disadvantages of many anticancer therapies: the disease develops resistance and can return even more aggressively.”

 

Finally, only two remaining tumours were found after more than one year of treatment among the mice that received eight inhibition and rest cycles. Dr Soucek found that Omomyc expression had been suppressed in these tumours, and this was the only adaptive mechanism that mice developed to treatment. “These results are hugely positive for us, because one year of life in a mouse is equivalent to almost 40 human years. The fact that the results are maintained over time, that there is no tumour relapse and no resistance, suggests that Myc-targeted therapy may offer an unprecedented way forward."

 

These encouraging results provide sufficient scientific evidence to consider taking the next step: inhibiting Myc in patients. “Now our challenge for the future is to make Myc inhibition feasible from a pharmacological point of view, so that it can be administered, and done so safely. This will be the last step before designing clinical trials with Myc inhibitors,” explained Dr Soucek. “We're so excited about reaching this turning point and I am quite certain that it will change the course of cancer therapy, despite there being a long road ahead.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Chanelle Savich's curator insight, March 13, 2013 11:04 PM

for students looking for PRO articles on animal based research.