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Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers

Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Experimental drugs being tested in clinical trials for leukaemia may also boost the body’s immune response against other forms of cancer, according to research from University College London (UCL).


"The drugs target an important protein called p110δ, produced in large amounts in white blood cells called ‘leukocytes’.


"Leukaemias can develop if leukocytes become cancerous, making p110δ a promising target for treating this form of cancer.


"And recent clinical trials using these drugs have shown encouraging results. But until now the potential benefit of these drugs for other types of cancer had remained unexplored.


"In the latest study, published in Nature, researchers working with mice bearing solid tumours found that the drugs - called p110δ inhibitors - helped boost their immune response against a range of tumour types – including breast cancer."


Editor's note: Scientists have tested new drugs in mice with a variety of tumor types, including breast cancer, and found that the drugs may help the mice fight off cancer. These drugs are already being used in humans in clinical trials for leukemia, so it might not be long before scientists try the drugs in volunteer patients with other types of cancer.

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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At ASCO, Next-Gen EGFR Inhibitors Show Early Promise in Lung Cancer Patients with T790M Mutations

"Next-generation EGFR inhibitors for treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who have acquired resistance to first-generation drugs in this class accurately hit mutant EGFR tumor cells and caused fewer serious side effects, early data presented at a major cancer conference showed.


"Researchers at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting here this week, presented preliminary data from human studies on three next-generation EGFR inhibitors: AstraZeneca's AZD9291, Clovis Oncology's CO-1686, and Hanmi Pharmaceutical's HM61713. All three agents showed promising activity against patients who had EGFR mutations, had received prior treatment with a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor – such as Roche's Tarceva (erlotinib) and AstraZeneca's Iressa (gefinitib) – and had T790M mutations."


Editor's note: For a more reader-friendly explanation of these new drugs, check out the "Drug resistance" section of our Chief Scientist's latest blog post.

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GenomeWeb  |  Jun 4, 2014

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Survey Sheds Light on Common Clinical Practice for Incompletely Resected Lung Cancer

"A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumour has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) says.

"Jean Yves Douillard, from the ICO Institut de Cancerologie de l'Ouest René Gauducheau, France, Chair of the ESMO Educational Committee, was commenting on a paper published in the journal Lung Cancer. In the study, researchers led by Raffaele Califano of The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK, surveyed 768 oncologists from 41 European countries about the treatments they offered patients who had 'R1 resected' non-small-cell lung cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 10, 2014

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Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System

Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results of a new study on mice and a phase 1 trial of humans suggest that prolonged cycles of fasting - for 2-4 days at a time - not only protect against toxic effects of chemotherapy, but also trigger stem cell regeneration of new immune cells and clearing out of old, damaged cells.


"The study, by researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and published in the journalCell Stem Cell, is the first to show that a natural intervention can trigger regeneration of an organ or system through stem cells.


"The team believes the findings could benefit people with immune system damage, for example if they have received chemotherapy treatment for cancer. It could also benefit the elderly whose immune systems are weakened through aging, making them more susceptible to disease."

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 7, 1:13 PM

Intuitively this week, my body felt like it needed to fast.  Intuitively, even thought I'd only planned a two day juice fast, it turned into four.  With the right plan for fasting, and doctor's supervision as needed depending on your state of health or knowledge about how to fast correctly, it is highly doable.  

 

I use a company that specializes in juicing and provides a whole kit of raw juices designed to give me different nutrients at different times of the day and it's all organic.  I was never hungry and only had one afternoon dealing with a detox headache from going off caffeine. The rest of the time I was completely energized.  Returning to food now, my body is craving raw vegetables and has no desire for caffeine or some of the other nutritional "slips" into foods that aren't healthy for me.

 

Amazing to see more natural paths to healing being embraced by the medical community.  Medical interventions are sometimes very necessary and so I am grateful that we have them.  It's not an either/or...it's an and - how can more "traditional" medical approaches and some natural approaches work together for best outcomes...that's an exciting place to be.

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Living With Cancer: Chronic, Not Cured

Living With Cancer: Chronic, Not Cured | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"At the end of yoga sessions for cancer patients, we are told to say to ourselves, 'I am whole, healed and healthy in this and every moment.' Perversely, since in yoga we express aspirations as if they were already so, the sentence reminds me of people who congratulate me on being 'cancer free.' Stable disease often goes unrecognized.


"Perhaps the concept of chronic cancer has been hard to comprehend because public discussion tends to focus on the initial diagnosis of breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer yields good survival rates and many patients can consider themselves cured. Often we assume a clear-cut partition between survivors and the terminally ill."


Editor's note: This article addresses the under-recognition of chronic cancer that is neither cured nor quickly progressing, and how patients cope with finding themselves in this "gray area."

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The New York Times  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 6, 12:27 PM

Finally!  Credit to the advocates for finally creating recognition for a segment of the cancer survivor population that has long been kept out of conversations - and, yes, even some support groups.  Education is the first step.  Chronic and metastatic disease can be a confronting conversation but to ignore the unique challenges, concerns and needs of any part of the population dealing with the impact of cancer is not acceptable.  Wonderful to see a mainstream media source bringing this issue to the forefront.  Education leads to less fear, less judgment, less ignorance and greater compassion, connection and support.

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, June 7, 12:41 PM

This article raises an important facet of some cancers -- that of a chronic condition rather than either a "cure" or an actively progressing disease. How others view this "gray area" vs. how cancer patients view it can make a difference in how supported the individual feels. Nonetheless, my view is that the cancer patient's perspective, attitudes and beliefs trump what goes on externally, and that we can choose happiness regardless of what is going on around us.

Teresa Levitch's curator insight, July 4, 9:00 AM

Given the long term effects of cancer treatment, such as Radiation Fibrosis, Chemo Brain, and Secondary Cancers ,after we are declared in remission we live in a gray area..

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Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC

Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Thoracic radiotherapy along with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival in patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer, according to results of a new study presented at ASCO.


"Ben Slotman, MD, PhD, of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, presented the study and said that previous work had shown that PCI could improve both symptomatic brain metastases and overall survival at 1 year. 'In that study, we also noticed that the vast majority of patients after chemotherapy had intrathoracic disease' and intrathoracic progression, he said, which was the impetus for the new study using thoracic radiotherapy."


Editor's note: To learn more about new prospects for treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC), see our two-part blog feature on the topic.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 5, 2014

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New Laws Give Dying Patients ‘Right to Try’ Unproven Drugs

New Laws Give Dying Patients ‘Right to Try’ Unproven Drugs | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Colorado, Missouri and Louisiana are poised to become the first states in the nation to give terminally ill patients the right to try experimental drugs without the blessing of the Food and Drug Administration, setting the stage for what could be a lengthy battle over who should decide whether a drug is too risky to try.


"Lawmakers in the three states have passed “Right to Try” laws with unanimous votes in recent weeks, after high-profile, social media campaigns in which families of dying patients have pushed for access to unapproved but potentially lifesaving drugs. Colorado’s governor is expected to sign that state’s law Saturday."


Editor's note: New cancer drugs can take a long time to reach the clinic, even after they have already proven safe and beneficial. Some patients are successful in gaining early access to drugs (see our Chief Scientist's blog post on so-called "compassionate access"), but it is a difficult process. Some drug companies are trying to remedy the issue by starting "expanded access trials" that give drugs to patients unable to enroll in the clinical trials testing them. For example, Novartis made its promising drug LDK378 available under expanded access in trial number NCT01947608 in September, 2013.

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The Washington Post  |  May 16, 2014

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The Washington Post  |  May 16, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 5, 11:12 AM

Let's see more states get behind this kind of legislation.  Cancer survivors and their loved ones have enough challenges and stressed to cope with - fighting for the right to try every option available should not be one of them.

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Astrazeneca’s Medimmune Presents Encouraging Immunotherapy Data at ASCO 2014

"MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, presented results today from its novel investigational immunotherapy portfolio, focusing on MEDI4736, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2014 Annual Meeting.  Overall, studies demonstrated durable clinical activity and tolerability for MEDI4736 across a range of tumor types.


"This announcement follows the recent progression of the first Phase III study for MEDI4736, an investigational, engineered, human monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Signals from PD-L1 help tumors avoid detection by the immune system. It is believed that by targeting PD-L1, MEDI4736 may block this ligand from sending out signals to T-cells to ‘ignore’ tumor cells, thereby countering cancer’s immune-evading tactics.


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments that boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer are a promising area of cancer research. A new immunotherapy drug called MEDI4736 is being tested in volunteer patients with different cancer types, and has shown good results for some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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MedImmune  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Cyramza Yields a Modest Survival Benefit in Second-line NSCLC

"Cyramza™ (ramucirumab, IMC-1121B; Eli Lilly) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of VEGFR-2. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. On February 19, 2014, Lilly announced via press release that the REVEL trial was positive for both overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III REVEL trial (NCT01168973) were reported at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The trial evaluated docetaxel with or without Cyramza in squamous or non-squamous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following disease progression after one prior platinum-based therapy."


Editor's note: A new targeted drug called Cyramza (aka ramucirumab) shows promise as a potential treatment for people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial, scientists tested the drug on volunteer patients with stage IV NSCLC. Compared to standard chemotherapy alone, patients who were treated with chemo plus Cyramza lived longer and had more time pass before their cancer worsened.

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OBR  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Immunomedics Announces Objective Responses in Five Types of Solid Cancer With IMMU-132

"Immunomedics, Inc., (Nasdaq:IMMU) today reported that 71% of patients (34 of 48) with diverse metastatic solid cancers had durable disease stabilization after receiving treatments with the Company's novel investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), IMMU-132. These include 7 patients (15%) with colorectal, small-cell and non-small-cell lung, esophageal, and triple-negative breast cancers showing partial responses with tumor shrinkage of 30% or more as measured by computed tomography (CT)."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new cancer drug called IMMU-132, which may work in a variety of cancer types. IMMU-132 is an immunotherapy, meaning it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients found promising results, including in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

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NASDAQ  |  Jun 2, 2014

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MEDIA ALERT New Data Show Giotrif® (Afatinib) Provided More than One Year Additional Survival for Lung Cancer Patients with the Most Common Type of EGFR Mutation (del19) Compared to Chemotherapy

"Boehringer Ingelheim today announced results of the pre-specified individual, as well as the exploratory combined, analyses of two Phase III trials (LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6). These data, to be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), demonstrated for the first time that patients with NSCLC with the most common epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (exon 19 deletions; del19) lived more than one year longer if treated with first-line afatinib compared to chemotherapy."


Editor's note: This article discusses the results of a clinical trial that tested a targeted drug called afatinib (aka Giotrif, or Gilotrif)  on volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial found that patients whose tumors had a particular mutation called del19 in the EGFR gene lived more than one year longer if treated with afatinib than if treated with chemotherapy. EGFR mutations and other mutations are detected via molecular testing, and can be used by oncologists to help develop personalized lung cancer treatment plans.

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Boehringer Ingelheim  |  Jun 2, 2014

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'Liquid Biopsy' Offers New Way to Track Lung Cancer

'Liquid Biopsy' Offers New Way to Track Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Scientists have shown how a lung cancer patient's blood sample could be used to monitor and predict their response to treatment – paving the way for personalised medicine for the disease.


"The recent study, published in the journalNature Medicine, also offers a method to test new therapies in the lab and to better understand how tumours become resistant to drugs.


"Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and new treatments are desperately needed. In many cases the tumour is inoperable and biopsies are difficult to obtain, giving scientists few samples with which to study the disease."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 3, 2014

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ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.


"Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found."


Editor's note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Cancer Patients Assail Insurer Policies on Costly Drugs

Five patient advocacy groups for diseases including cancer and AIDS urged the U.S. to force Obamacare insurers to lower co-payments on costly drugs, saying some plans discriminate against people with serious illness.


"Representatives of the groups, which acknowledged receiving funding from pharmaceutical companies, spoke today at an event organized by the industry’s Washington-based lobbyists. That group released a study showing that 60 percent of mid-level plans on the new health exchanges placed multiple sclerosis and cancer drugs on tiers with the highest level of co-payments, in many cases requiring 30 percent of the price or more."

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Bloomberg  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Few Circulating Cancer Cells Could Cue Risk of Metastases

"A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients' chances of survival, say researchers. Metastasis accounts for an estimated 90 percent of cancer deaths. For decades, researchers tried to develop a way to gauge a cancer's risk of metastasizing from a blood sample -- the long-sought-after liquid biopsy."

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ScienceDaily | Jun 9, 2014
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Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests

Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Up to 40 percent of lung cancer patients do not respond to a targeted therapy designed to block tumor growth—a puzzling clinical setback that researchers have long tried to solve. Now, scientists at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute have discovered why that intrinsic resistance occurs—and they pinpoint a drug they say could potentially reverse it."


"Their findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that over-expression of the growth protein Cripto-1 makes lung cancer cells resistant to the drug erlotinib (Tarceva®). Experiments in cell lines and in animals demonstrated that blocking Cripto-1 signaling transduction restored sensitivity to the drug, one of a number of EGFR inhibitors used in non-small cell lung carcinoma and other cancers."


Editor's note: Lung cancer patients who try the targeted therapy drug erlotinib (brand name Tarceva) may be intrinsically resistant to it; it has no effect on their tumor growth. Researchers have now found that abnormalities involving a gene called Cripto-1 can make a tumor resistant to Tarceva, and that drugs that block Cripto-1's role in tumor cells can restore sensitivity to Tarceva. These studies were done on human cancer cells in the lab and in animals, but a new clinical trial with volunteer patients will test whether a drug called AZD0424 might undo Tarceva resistance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), allowing them to benefit from Tarceva treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 9, 2014

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Biomarkers Accurately Distinguish Mesothelioma from Non-Cancerous Tissue

Biomarkers Accurately Distinguish Mesothelioma from Non-Cancerous Tissue | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Scientists have identified four biomarkers that may help resolve the difficult differential diagnosis between malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and non-cancerous pleural tissue with reactive mesothelial proliferations (RMPs). This is a frequent differential diagnostic problem in pleural biopsy samples taken from patients with clinical suspicion of MPM. The ability to make more accurate diagnoses earlier may facilitate improved patient outcomes. This new study appears in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics."


Editor's note: Diagnosis of cancer is not always straightforward. New techniques allow doctors to use the molecular/genetic characteristics of a tumor to more quickly and accurately diagnose cancer. In the research described here, scientists identified new molecular characteristics ("biomarkers") that could be used to help identify mesothelioma tumors.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 6, 2014

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ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival

ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab modestly improved survival in squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a pivotal trial, but many called the effect too small to count.


"Adding the drug to a standard chemotherapy regimen improved overall survival by 16% (P=0.012), Nick Thatcher, MD, of Christie Hospital in Manchester, England, and colleagues found in the SQUIRE trial.


"While only about a 6-week gain over chemotherapy alone (median 11.5 versus 9.9 months), Thatcher called the findings an important advance."


Editor's note: Necitumumab is a drug that may hold promise for some patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial to test the drug on volunteer patients, researchers found that necitumumab can increase survival by 6 weeks, compared to standard chemotherapy treatment. Some researchers say a 6 week increase in survival time is not terribly meaningful, and may be setting the bar too low for treatment of squamous NSCLC.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings

Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers with UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Centerreport that two new experimental drugs have shown great promise in the treatment of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, which accounts for about 85 percent of all lung cancers. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.


"The drugs—ramucirumab and CO-1868—were shown in separate clinical trials to increase survival times with fewer toxic side effects than standard treatments. The findings were presented this week at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago."


Editor's note: For more on the ramucirumab findings, see our previous news post. To learn more about targeted therapies like CO-1686 and ramucirumab, visit our lung cancer Basics.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Xcovery Presents Interim Phase 1 Results of X-396 in ALK positive
NSCLC at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting

Xcovery Presents Interim Phase 1 Results of X-396 in ALK positive <br/>      NSCLC at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Xcovery , a developer of next-generation targeted therapeutics for cancer, today presented preliminary results at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) from a phase 1 study of X-396, a potent small molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, that showed X-396 is well tolerated and has antitumor activity in patients with ALK positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new targeted drug called X-396. The drug is meant to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing. A clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients found promising results for X-396. It appeared to benefit patients whether or not they had previously taken and grown resistant to crizotinib, another ALK-targeted drug.

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MarketWatch  |  Jun 3, 2014

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AstraZeneca Seeking to Get Cancer Drugs to Patients Early

AstraZeneca Seeking to Get Cancer Drugs to Patients Early | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"British patients could benefit from AstraZeneca's promising new cancer drugs well before they complete clinical testing, the Telegraph can reveal.


"Pascal Soriot, chief executive, told the Telegraph he was looking to make two of Astra's most eye-catching cancer drugs widely available to patients as soon as possible.


"Britain's recently launched early access to medicines scheme, which aims to get drugs to patients years earlier than the normal regulatory process allows, is among the programmes in Mr Soriot's sights. The US, France and Japan have also established pathways to fast-track promising new drugs to patients ahead of final regulatory approval."

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The Telegraph  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.


"Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word 'cancer' means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says."

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Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma

Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Aduro BioTech, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the presentation of safety and efficacy data from a Phase 1b clinical trial of its novel immunotherapy CRS-207 in combination with standard chemotherapy in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Of the 16 evaluable patients, 69% (11/16) had confirmed durable partial responses (PR) with 25% (4/16) experiencing stable disease (SD) after CRS-207 and chemotherapy. The results were presented by Raffit Hassan, M.D., co-chief of the Thoracic and GI Oncology Branch at the National Cancer Institute, in a poster presentation at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting (ASCO) held in Chicago."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new drug called CRS-207 for treating mesothelioma. CRS-207 is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial testing CRS-207 in volunteer patients found promising results for the drug.

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, June 5, 2:39 AM

CRS-207, based on Aduro’s live-attenuated, double-deleted (LADD) Listeria monocytogenesimmunotherapy platform, has been engineered to induce a potent innate immune response as well as an adaptive immune response targeting mesothelin, an antigen over-expressed in MPM tumors.


CRS-207 plus GVAX in a Phase II advanced pancreatic cancer trial (ECLIPSE) in 93 evaluable patients extended overall survival to 6.1 months from the GVAX arm alone.

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Researchers Develop Process to Help Personalize Treatment for Lung Cancer Patients

"Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium, have developed a process to analyze mutated genes in lung adenocarcinoma to help better select personalized treatment options for patients. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer in the United States with approximately 130,000 people diagnosed each year.


"The study, published in the May 21 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, investigated 10 highly mutated and altered genes that contribute to cancer progression, termed oncogenic driver genes, in more than 1,000 lung cancer patients. Patients with adenocarcinoma have a high probability of having mutated oncogenic driver genes in their tumors."


Editor's note: More and more, doctors are prescribing personalized cancer treatments based on genetic mutations found in patients' tumors. Learn more about personalized medicine for lung cancer in The Basics.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Tracer Could Indicate Radiation Benefit to Patient

Tracer Could Indicate Radiation Benefit to Patient | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A world-first radiotherapy treatment trial by University of WA researchers could have a major impact on the quality of life for mesothelioma patients.


"Funded by an almost $100,000 Cancer Council WA grant, the research team is exploring why some patients respond to radiotherapy treatment while others don't, as well as developing tests to predict whether patients will respond to avoid people being treated unnecessarily."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 3, 2014

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