Lung Cancer Dispatch
4.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ClinicalTrials.gov Reopens Despite U.S. Government Shutdown

ClinicalTrials.gov Reopens Despite U.S. Government Shutdown | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Numerous federal services in the U.S. have been suspended due to the ongoing government shutdown. Among the services affected was the federal registry of clinical trials, accessible via the website ClinicalTrials.gov. New trials were not being entered into the registry and made available for enrollment. As a result, many people, including patients with advanced cancer, were unable to enroll in studies offering potentially lifesaving experimental treatments. However, after a U.S. Congressman contacted the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which administers the database, a small number of furloughed workers was called back to reopen the website. While the website is not fully operational, processing of clinical trial registrations has resumed, along with updates of the most critical information.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Insider | Oct 4, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:56 PM

Science Insider | Oct 4, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:56 PM

Science Insider | Oct 4, 2013

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New PD-1 Blocker May Shrink Lung Tumors

An experimental immunotherapy drug shrank tumors in a quarter of people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), report researchers from a small clinical trial. Called MK-3475, the drug blocks PD-1, a cell surface protein that disguises tumor cells from our immune systems. To see if these findings hold up in a larger, more rigorous trial, the researchers plan to start a phase II/III clinical trial soon.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Bloomberg Businessweek │Oct 1, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ALK Inhibitor on Track for Phase II Lung Cancer Trial

Early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that an experimental ALK inhibitor drug will progress to the next phase of testing, researchers reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Called TSR-011, the new ALK inhibitor shrank tumors or kept them from growing in three people with non-small cell lung cancers that had abnormal ALK genes and that resisted a current ALK inhibitor called crizotinib. The researchers expect that TSR-011 will advance to a phase II trial of NSCLC patients with ALK abnormalities by end of year.

Cancer Commons's insight:

TESARO, Inc.│Sep 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

MET Inhibitor Fails to Prolong Life in NSCLC Trial

MET Inhibitor Fails to Prolong Life in NSCLC Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A clinical trial of a MET inhibitor has been stopped because the drug doesn't keep people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) alive longer, researchers reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The phase III trial included 1,048 people with NSCLC, where half were given the MET inhibitor tivantinib, in combination with erlotinib, which inhibits a protein linked to abnormal cell division. Although tivantinib did not extend life, it did keep tumors from growing for awhile (3.6 mo with this drug vs 1.9 mo without it). Now, the researchers are analyzing the results to see if tivantinib benefitted people with tumors that make too much of the MET protein.

Cancer Commons's insight:

European Society For Medical Oncology│Sep 29, 2013

more...
Raja Mudad's curator insight, October 3, 2013 7:27 AM

A new oral drug may help a subset of patients with NS|CL|C who have over expression of cmet

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Blood Pressure Drug Boosts Chemotherapy Delivery in Mice

Blood Pressure Drug Boosts Chemotherapy Delivery in Mice | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

One reason chemotherapies fail is that blood vessels are collapsed in the middle of tumors, blocking the delivery of anticancer drugs. Now, new research suggests that a blood pressure drug called losartan may facilitate chemotherapy throughout tumors. Losartan decompresses tumor blood vessels, increasing blood flow and chemotherapy drug delivery in mouse models of breast and pancreatic cancer. To see if these findings will also hold for people, a phase II clinical trial of pancreatic cancer patients is underway. This trial is currently accepting new participants.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Nature Communications │Oct 1, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:58 PM

Nature Communications │Oct 1, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:12 PM

Nature Communications │Oct 1, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Immune-Based Drug Shows Promise Against Lung Cancer, Especially in Smokers

Immune-Based Drug Shows Promise Against Lung Cancer, Especially in Smokers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Results from an early clinical trial suggest that the drug MPDL3280A is effective against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phase I study found that tumors shrank in 23% of patients with advanced NSCLC treated with MPDL3280A. The effect was more pronounced in smokers (who had a 26% response rate) than in nonsmokers (a 10% rate), making it the first treatment with stronger activity in smokers. MPDL3280A inhibits PD-L1, a protein expressed on cancer cells that suppresses the immune response. Blocking PD-L1 allows the immune system to keep attacking the cancer. The tumor cells in smokers may carry more mutations, provoking a stronger attack from the unleashed immune system, which could explain the stronger effects in smokers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | Sep 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Higher Healthcare Spending Associated with Fewer Cancer Deaths

The more a country’s government spends on healthcare, the lower the rate of deaths from cancer in that nation, a study in the European Union (EU) found. Higher gross domestic product (GDP), a higher percentage of GDP invested in healthcare, and more health expenditure per person per year were all linked to fewer deaths from cancer. EU member nations who score higher on these factors actually record a higher incidence of cancer, possibly because of better screening programs that detect more cases of cancer. However, in these countries, a significantly lower proportion of those diagnosed with cancer die from it.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 1, 2013 1:08 PM

ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 1, 2013 1:08 PM

ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer Drug Retaspimycin Fails Clinical Trial

A phase II clinical trial found no survival benefit for the lung cancer drug retaspimycin in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial examined NSCLC patients with a history of smoking who were given the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere) either with or without retaspimycin. Adding retaspimycin did not improve overall survival in NSCLC patients in general or in the subset of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (a type of NSCLC closely linked to smoking). The company will complete enrollment in a separate study investigating retaspimycin in combination with everolimus (Afinitor) by the end of 2013, but will begin no further clinical trials with retaspimycin.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | Sep 25, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

UK Health Authority Issues Final Rejection for Cancer Drug Xalkori

UK Health Authority Issues Final Rejection for Cancer Drug Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) confirmed its decision to reject using National Health Service funding to provide crizotinib (Xalkori) to patients. Xalkori is used for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the ALK gene. While NICE acknowledges that Xalkori is effective in these patients, they do not consider its benefit substantial enough to warrant its high cost. Xalkori has been found to extend the time without cancer progression by an average of 5.1 months compared to standard chemotherapy; it is unclear whether it increases overall survival. UK patients can still take Xalkori, but would have to pay the full cost themselves (£37,512 - £51,579 for a complete treatment course).

Cancer Commons's insight:

PharmaTimes | Sep 25, 2013

more...
Raja Mudad's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:31 AM

We are very lucky in this country (so far!!) to be able to use cutting edge, science-based treatments for cancers.  Xalkori (crizotinib) for ALK + patients with lung cancer will not be covered in the UK.

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Married Cancer Patients More Likely to Survive

Married Cancer Patients More Likely to Survive | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Married people are 20% less likely to die from cancer, a recent study found. Married patients were less likely to be diagnosed with an advanced stage of the disease and more likely to undergo the best treatment plan for their disease state. Moreover, even at the same cancer stage and undergoing the same treatment, married patients were significantly less likely to die. For several cancers, including prostate and colorectal cancer, the effect of marriage on survival was greater than that of chemotherapy. Several factors may explain these findings. Spouses may remind each other to get regular medical check-ups and encourage each other to stick to their cancer treatments. Social support may also alleviate depression, lower stress, and strengthen the immune system.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:13 PM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:14 PM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 14, 2013 2:35 PM

Great news...but what about those who are not married?  How can we turn these findings into tools to increase survival for more people, even if they are single? 

 

Looks like a lot of opportunity for technology based apps that support accountabilty for regular checkups (Keep a Breast Foundation (http://www.keep-a-breast.org/) has a great, free app that is a self-check reminder) and social media like Facebook and peer to peer organizations such as stupidcancer.com for Young Adults, Imerman Angels for survivors and caregivers to help overcome isolation.

 

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDG-PET Imaging May Help Predict Survival after Treatment of Advanced Lung Cancer

People with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are usually treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, radiation interferes with the standard method of scanning for lung abnormalities, computed tomography (CT), making its measurements difficult to interpret. This creates the risk that leftover tumor fragments or new cancer spread may be overlooked. A different imaging methodology, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), may be more accurate in such patients. FDG-PET measures sucrose uptake into cells. High uptake values indicate highly active cells, suggesting the presence of cancerous tissue. In a recent clinical trial, higher standardized uptake values (SUVs) in FDG-PET scans predicted lower survival in people with stage III NSCLC who had received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, suggesting that the method accurately detected cancerous tissue.

Cancer Commons's insight:

CancerNetwork | Sep 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Cancer Experts Organization Decries Cuts in Biomedical Research Funding

Cancer Experts Organization Decries Cuts in Biomedical Research Funding | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Over 200 medical research advocacy organizations urged the U.S. Congress to invest in biomedical research during the Rally for Medical Research Hill Day. In a statement supporting the event, the president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) criticized cuts in federal funding for biomedical research. He referenced a recent survey showing that three-quarters of cancer researchers report that the current federal funding situation is negatively impacting their ability to conduct research, more than one-third have had to lay off skilled staff, and many young researchers are choosing to leave the field. These difficulties undermine the promise of recent scientific advances that would otherwise offer the prospect of significant progress against cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post | Sep 18, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

'Super Responders' May Hold Clues for Cancer Treatment

'Super Responders' May Hold Clues for Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In rare, previously unexplained cases, individual cancer patients respond to treatment much better than others do. Now, faster and cheaper DNA sequencing is allowing researchers to search the entire genetic material of such patients for the causes of their 'super responder' status. In one case, researchers linked one patient's exceptional response to Afinitor (everolimus) to a mutation in the TSC1 gene. They plan to develop a test for this mutation, hoping to identify other cancer patients who will respond strongly to Afinitor. Such studies may resurrect drug candidates that were abandoned after clinical trials, where they were ineffective in most, but very effective in a few patients. Clinical trials and clinics focusing specifically on super responders are being planned.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | Sep 15, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Roche Gets Breakthrough Status for Lung Cancer Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted breakthrough therapy designation for a lung cancer treatment  called alectinib, made by Roche. The designation was based on new data presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECC).  Alectinib is reported to be effective in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the ALK gene. Imporantly, tumor shrinkage was seen in patients whose cancer worsened on crizotinib (Xalkori), the currently approved drug for this subgroup of patents.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Drug Discovery and Development | Sep 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

First T790M Inhibitor Shows Promise in Early Lung Cancer Trial

First T790M Inhibitor Shows Promise in Early Lung Cancer Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Researchers may finally have found a treatment for a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that resists currently available therapies, according results presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. These resistant NSCLCs have an EGFR mutation called T790M, which is more common in Asian people; the experimental treatment is a T790M inhibitor called AZD9291. In an ongoing phase I clinical trial that included 12 people with lung cancers that had the T790M mutation, tumors shrank in more than half. This trial is currently enrolling new patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Street│Sep 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New ALK Inhibitor Shrinks Lung Cancer in Early Trial

New ALK Inhibitor Shrinks Lung Cancer in Early Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

On the strength of promising results from an ongoing clinical trial, reseachers are starting a new trial for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has abnormal ALK genes. This update was presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The phase I/II trial included 34 people with NSCLC with ALK abnormalities who were treated with an ALK inhibitor called AP26113. Tumors shrank in nearly all of the patients, including tumors that had spread to the brain, as well as those that resisted another ALK inhibitor called crizotinib (Xalkori). The new trial will test how well AP26113 shrinks NSCLCs that both have ALK abnormalities and are resistant to crizotinib.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. │Sep 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Greenlights NSCLC Vaccine Trial for Subgroups

An experimental lung cancer vaccine does not extend life overall, but may still benefit some people, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve further trials for these groups. These findings were reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Called belagenpumatucel-L, the vaccine is based on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and boosts the immune response. The phase III clinical trial included 532 people with NSCLC who had already undergone chemotherapy and the vaccine benefitted two subgroups. People who had previously been treated with radiation lived longer (40 mo with radiation vs 10 mo without radiation), as did people whose lung cancers were not adenocarcinomas (20 mo for nonadenocarcinomas vs 12 mo for adenocarcinomas).

Cancer Commons's insight:

European Society for Medical Oncology│Sep 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Molecular Profiling Helps Guide Treatment of Cancers of Unknown Origin

In cases of cancer that has spread throughout the body, it can sometimes be difficult to determine where the cancer originally developed. A large, new study found that in such cases, molecular profiling of the cancer tissue, even if it is not from the original ('primary') tumor, can meaningfully guide the choice of treatment. Such profiling identified useful biomarkers in 77% of the examined patients, including various genetic mutations, along with over- or underexpression of different proteins. These biomarkers then informed the selection of targeted therapies, which were highly effective in many cases. Indeed, determining the molecular profile of the cancer tissue appeared to be more useful than finding out which body part the cancer originated from.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape | Sep 29, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 1, 2013 2:09 PM

Medscape | Sep 29, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 1, 2013 2:09 PM

Medscape | Sep 29, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Antidepressant Drugs May Also Treat SCLC

Antidepressant Drugs May Also Treat SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Two drugs that are currently approved to treat symptoms of depression may also be effective against small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Researchers used bioinformatics, which combines mathematics and computer science to analyze large amounts of biological data, to pinpoint drugs likely to act on pathways that are important in SCLC. They identified the antidepressant imipramine (Tofranil) and the sedative/anti-nausea medication promethazine (Phenergan). Both drugs killed SCLC cells both in cell culture and in mouse models of chemotherapy-resistant SCLC. SCLC tumors arise from cells that are part of the hormone and nervous system, which may explain the effectiveness of these drugs. A new clinical trial will explore the effectiveness of desipramine (Norpramin), a drug similar to Tofranil, in SCLC.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Requirement for Randomized Clinical Trials May Be Reduced for Some New Cancer Drugs

Requirement for Randomized Clinical Trials May Be Reduced for Some New Cancer Drugs | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

To gain regulatory approval, new drugs must complete randomized clinical trials involving large numbers of patients. In these trials, some participants receive the drug, while others receive a standard treatment for the disease, to assess whether the new drug is truly superior to existing treatments. However, in cases where preliminary data strongly suggest that a new drug is more effective than standard treatments, such as with targeted cancer therapies, some experts argue that large, randomized trials are ethically indefensible, because they mandate that many patients receive treatment that is likely inferior. In the U.S., a new 'breakthrough therapy' pathway has been created for such drugs, which greatly reduces the requirement for large, randomized clinical trials and speeds up the approval process.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | Sep 26, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer Vaccine Brought Back for New Clinical Trial

A new clinical trial will reexamine the lung cancer vaccine tecemotide, formerly known as Stimuvax. Tecemotide stimulates the patient's immune system to attack tumor cells. Although the drug previously failed in the START clinical trial, drugmakers reported that later analyses showed that tecemotide increased survival in the subset of patients who had been treated with chemoradiotherapy (simultaneous chemotherapy and radiation therapy, or CRT) before tecemotide. Like START, the new trial, START2, will enroll patients with locally advanced, stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that cannot be removed with surgery. However, START2 will exclusively focus on patients who have previously received CRT.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | Sep 25, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDG-PET Distinguishes Low- and High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients After Radiotherapy

FDG-PET Distinguishes Low- and High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients After Radiotherapy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans may be able to detect early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who are at high risk of treatment failure after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A retrospective study examined patients with early-stage NSCLC who were ineligible for or refused surgery and were instead treated with SBRT. Patients with lower FDG-PET readings prior to SBRT treatment survived longer, and those whose FDG-PET readings changed more after SBRT were less likely to experience treatment failure. FDG-PET scans may therefore help identify which patients are at lower or higher risk of recurrence; high-risk patients may opt for additional treatment and/or more frequent surveillance after treatment. FDG-PET has shown similar predictive value in early-stage NSCLC treated with surgery.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Sep 24, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Patient Feedback Can Provide Valuable Evidence about Cancer Treatments

Patient Feedback Can Provide Valuable Evidence about Cancer Treatments | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Findings from a recent clinical trial validate patients as a crucial source of evidence in cancer research. The trial investigated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving chemotherapy plus standard- or high-dose radiotherapy. The high-dose arm of the trial was eventually closed, because its patients had shorter survival than those treated with standard-dose radiation. Notably, health care providers had not reported higher toxicity in high-dose patients. However, patients in this group had reported lower quality of life than those in the standard-dose group, suggesting that patient feedback can pinpoint treatment effects not captured by provider reports. Patients also reported a higher quality of life with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT).

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Sep 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Two New Trials of Mesothelioma Treatments Begin in the UK

Mesothelioma is a form of lung cancer strongly associated with exposure to asbestos. Even though asbestos has been banned or heavily regulated in most developed nations, due to delayed onset, the number of mesothelioma cases is predicted to climb until around 2020. In the UK, which has the highest mesothelioma incidence worldwide, two new clinical trials are aiming to find treatments for the disease. The Meso2 trial will investigate ganetespib, while the COMMAND trial will examine defactinib. Defactinib specifically targets cancer stem cells, which often survive cancer treatment and cause cancer recurrence. The drug may therefore help prevent relapse after first-line therapy.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Sep 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

U.S. Cancer Experts' Report Emphasizes Successes, Need for More Funding

U.S. Cancer Experts' Report Emphasizes Successes, Need for More Funding | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Over 200 medical research advocacy organizations urged the U.S. Congress to invest in biomedical research during the Rally for Medical Research Hill Day. In a statement supporting the event, the president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) criticized cuts in federal funding for biomedical research. He referenced a recent survey showing that three-quarters of cancer researchers report that the current federal funding situation is negatively impacting their ability to conduct research, more than one-third have had to lay off skilled staff, and many young researchers are choosing to leave the field. These difficulties undermine the promise of recent scientific advances that would otherwise offer the prospect of significant progress against cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Los Angeles Times | Sep 17, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:23 PM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 17, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:23 PM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 17, 2013