Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find
3.6K views | +0 today
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective

Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Combining cetuximab (Erbitux), bevacizumab (Avastin), and traditional chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appeared to be safe and effective in a phase II clinical trial. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received Erbitux and Avastin in addition to carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane) as first-line treatment, followed by maintenance treatment with Erbitux and Avastin. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Serious side effects were relatively rare; the rate was comparable to that of either Erbitux or Avastin alone. Both Erbitux and Avastin have shown efficacy in NSCLC by themselves, but may be more effective when given together. An ongoing phase III clinical trial will further investigate this drug combination.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today | Nov 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer

Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new computer program may soon help doctors decide whether patients should get tested for cancer based on their symptoms. The software is not meant to replace the physician’s judgment, but rather supplement it, developers say. Many general practitioners do not have specific cancer expertise, or the time to calculate each patient’s cancer risk in detail–a task made instantaneous by the computer program. The software also analyzes each symptom in the context of all other relevant information in a patient’s record–age, sex, smoking status, family history–along with any other symptoms reported during earlier visits. Ensuring timely testing for patients at risk of cancer is a critical step towards early treatment with a higher chance of success.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Research UK | Nov 5, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:26 PM

Cancer Research UK | Nov 5, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:26 PM

Cancer Research UK | Nov 5, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Abnormal Chromosome Numbers May Play an Important Role in Cancer Development

Abnormal Chromosome Numbers May Play an Important Role in Cancer Development | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer genetics has traditionally focused on mutations in individual genes. A new study, however, focuses on chromosomes, the structures on which genes are located. Cancer cells often have too many or too few copies of a chromosome. This phenomenon, called “aneuploidy”, is often considered to be just a byproduct of the cancer cell’s chaotic state. In the study, researchers identified genes likely to promote or suppress tumor growth; they then noted on which chromosomes these genes were located. Chromosomes containing more tumor-promoting than tumor-suppressing genes were more likely to be multiplied inside cancer cells, while chromosomes with more tumor-suppressing genes were likely to be deleted. This finding suggests that chromosome deletions or multiplications may indeed be a cause of cancer, instead of an effect.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Oct 31, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:37 PM

ScienceDaily | Oct 31, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:37 PM

ScienceDaily | Oct 31, 2013

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Alternative Therapies Can Benefit People with Lung Cancer

New guidelines extend care for lung cancer to nontraditional treatments, including mind–body therapies to alleviate anxiety and pain as well as acupuncture for nausea during chemotherapy. Adopted by the Society of Integrative Oncology (SIO), these guidelines are evidence based and were drawn from a review of existing studies. Importantly, the researchers stress that alternative therapies are not enough on their own, but rather must be integrated with traditional care. The lung cancer guidelines are the SIO's fourth set, and the next guidelines will focus on how integrative therapies can benefit people with breast cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Society of Integrative Oncology│Oct 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

FDA to Regulate Personalized Medicine

Now that medical treatment is increasingly tailored to patient subtypes (eg, lung cancer patients with mutations in the ALK gene can be treated with Xalkori), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released a new report explaining how it will regulate personalized therapies and tests. The first targeted therapy used in the U.S. was trastuzumab, which is for HER2 breast cancer and was approved in 1998. Since then, the FDA has approved more than 100 treatments that target specific genetic abnormalities, including four drugs for cancer subtypes that are identified by companion test kits.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:38 PM

Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:06 AM

Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

IDing Multiple Mutations Could Expand Cancer Treatment Options

IDing Multiple Mutations Could Expand Cancer Treatment Options | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Many tumors have more than one genetic abnormality and researchers want to be able to identify them all at once. Having multiple targets for therapies could help circumvent the drug resistance that often develops during cancer treatment. New research suggests that this approach may be possible—in a pilot study of nine people, the researchers identified genetic changes more comprehensively by comparing tumor DNA to normal DNA from the same person. The researchers also compared the activity of tumor genes to that of normal genes. Next, they hope to speed the DNA sequencing turnaround time and to optimize the process for verifying treatment targets in tumor biopsies.

Cancer Commons's insight:

PLOS One│Oct 30, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:51 PM

PLOS One│Oct 30, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:05 PM

PLOS One│Oct 30, 2013

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

When Cancer Care Is Too Much of a Good Thing

When Cancer Care Is Too Much of a Good Thing | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Some routine cancer tests and treatments can do more harm than good. Based on clinical evidence, the American Society of Clinical Oncology highlights cancer care that should be curbed in an annual Top Five List. This year's recommendations include:

  • Not giving antinausea drugs at the beginning of chemotherapies that are only moderately likely to cause nausea;
  • Not treating breast cancers that have spread with combination chemotherapy—unless symptom relief is urgent;
  • Not monitoring for cancer recurrence with advanced imaging technologies—such as positron-emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and radionuclide bone scans—unless there are symptoms of cancer;
  • Not screening men for prostate cancer unless they are likely to live at least another 10 years; and
  • Not giving people targeted therapies unless their tumor has the specific genetic abnormality that is targeted.
Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post│Oct 29, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 30, 2013 4:43 PM

ASCO Post│Oct 29, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:04 PM

ASCO Post│Oct 29, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Giving Lung Cancer Surgeons a 3-D View

Giving Lung Cancer Surgeons a 3-D View | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is performed using surgical tools on long, thin 'stalks' that are inserted through small incisions (less than 1 inch). A small video camera on a flexible tube is introduced through another small hole to guide the surgeon's work. MIS offers less pain and faster recovery than traditional surgery. However, previously, the camera had only been able to transmit two-dimensional images to the surgeon, who had to perform the surgery without proper depth perception. Now, three-dimensional (3-D) video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) adds a new dimension. Surgeons wear 3-D goggles during the surgery, giving them a clearer picture of the region on which they are operating. VATS can be used for various chest surgeries, including lung cancer surgeries.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Compassionate Use of Unapproved Drugs Raises Difficult Ethical Issues

Compassionate Use of Unapproved Drugs Raises Difficult Ethical Issues | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Patients with terminal illnesses, including late-stage cancer patients, are understandably eager to try still-unapproved experimental drugs once other options have been exhausted. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently created a program to make it easier for drug companies to grant 'compassionate use,' which allows patients in extraordinary need access to otherwise unauthorized treatments. However, the decision to dispense experimental drugs is left to the companies, which are often reluctant to take this risky step. Experimental drugs are just that–experimental; they may have catastrophic side effects or simply not work. When these drugs are given outside the framework of a well-designed clinical trial, it becomes impossible to judge decisively whether they actually work. And if all patients could bypass clinical trials, there would be no incentive for anyone to enroll in these clinical trials, meaning that new drugs would never be properly studied and approved. Compassionate use therefore needs to be approved by experienced medical professionals on a case-by-case basis, and remain an option of last resort only.

Cancer Commons's insight:

New York Times | Oct 31, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:51 AM

New York Times | Oct 31, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:51 AM

New York Times | Oct 31, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Detecting Lung Cancer in Phlegm

Detecting Lung Cancer in Phlegm | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

With a new test, getting screened for lung cancer may be as simple as hocking up a loogie. The LuCED test analyzes coughed-up phlegm (strictly called 'sputum' once it has been spit out) for evidence of lung cancer. The test creates detailed three-dimensional (3-D) images of the cells inside the phlegm. In pilot tests, LuCED exhibited over 95% sensitivity (meaning it very rarely missed lung cancer when it was present) and 99.8% selectivity (meaning that it almost never falsely detected lung cancer when it was absent). In contrast, up to 96% of 'lung cancer' findings by computed tomography (CT) are actually false alarms. A highly specific, noninvasive test could greatly promote more effective screening and early detection of lung cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Codex | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Previously Neglected Lymph Nodes Are Significant in Mesothelioma

To assess cancer stage, that is, how far advanced a cancer is, doctors routinely examine lymph nodes. However, a subset of lymph nodes located between the ribs near the spine, the so-called posterior intercostal lymph nodes, are not usually assessed in cancer staging. In a retrospective study of patients who had undergone surgery for mesothelioma (a type of lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure), researchers found that the cancer had spread to the posterior intercostal lymph nodes in over half of these patients. Patients who had no evidence of cancer in the posterior intercostal lymph nodes lived nearly 2.5 years longer, on average, than those who had. The posterior intercostal lymph nodes appear to be highly significant and should be biopsied routinely in mesothelioma patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Penn Medicine | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical

Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The GALAXY-1 clinical trial examines patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), receiving either ganetespib (a new cancer drug) and docetaxel (Taxotere, a chemotherapy drug) or Taxotere alone as second-line treatment. Recent interim results show ganetespib-treated patients surviving 10.4 months on average (vs 8.4 months in the Taxotere-only group) and experiencing a 10% reduction in the risk of death. This is a smaller difference than was seen in preliminary results in September, 2012 and June, 2013 (31% and 18% reduction in risk of death, respectively). It is also unclear whether the effect is indeed caused by ganetespib or due to chance. However, the drug’s makers emphasize that ganetespib may be more effective in certain patient subgroups.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Street | Oct 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer 'Breathalyzer' Detects Exhaled Biomarkers

Lung Cancer 'Breathalyzer' Detects Exhaled Biomarkers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new test may be able to detect lung cancer by examining patients’ breath. Researchers compared the exhaled breath from lung cancer patients to that from patients with noncancerous lung growths and from cancer-free individuals at high risk of lung cancer. The exhalations were analyzed using a colorimeter sensor array, a device that contains multiple indicators that change colors when exposed to different chemicals. The distinctive color patterns produced by exhaled breath from lung cancer patients allowed researchers to distinguish these individuals from those without lung cancer with great accuracy. This method may allow the detection of lung cancer using a fast, noninvasive test.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

IMGN901 Demonstrates No Significant Benefit, Possible Harm in Small Cell Lung Cancer

IMGN901 Demonstrates No Significant Benefit, Possible Harm in Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The makers of lorvotuzumab mertansine (IMGN901) have halted a clinical trial investigating the use of the drug in extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). An independent monitoring group recommended ending the trial because patients treated with IMGN901 in addition to the chemotherapy agents etoposide (Etopophos) and carboplatin (Paraplatin) fared no better than patients treated with Etopophos and Paraplatin only. Furthermore, the patient group receiving IMGN901 appeared to have higher rates of infections and infection-related deaths, with at least one death potentially related to IMGN901.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Yahoo! Finance | Nov 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Early Results For New Lung Cancer Immunotherapies Inspire Optimism

Three new immunotherapy drugs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – nivolumab, lambrolizumab (MK-3475), and MPDL-3280A – have produced encouraging early results. All three interfere with PD-1 and PD-L1, molecules that interact to shield tumors from being attacked by the body's immune system. In phase I trials, more than 20% of participants experienced tumor shrinkage in response to each of the three drugs. For these patients, effects tended to be rapid and long-lasting. Most continue to respond favorably to treatment at this time, having been in the trials for up to 7 months (MPDL-3280A), an average of 9 months (lambrolizumab), or an average of 1.5 years and ranging up to 2.5 years (nivolumab). Overall toxicity was acceptable, though some cases of severe side effects were seen, including two deaths with nivolumab.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape | Oct 31, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Stronger Case for Targeted Therapies Against Lung Cancer

New research provides compelling evidence that targeted treatments benefit people with lung cancer. Researchers at 14 U.S. centers found that of nearly 1,000 people with lung cancers who were tested for 10 genetic abnormalities, 63% had an abnormality and 23% of these were treated with the appropriate targeted therapy. Those who received targeted treatments lived 1.5 times longer than those who did not (a median of 3.5 vs 2.4 years, respectively). People with ALK abnormalities lived longest at 4.3 years; followed by those with sensitizing EGFR mutations at 4.0 years; other EGFR mutations at 3.3 years; and KRAS mutations at 2.4 years. These findings were presented at the 2013 World Conference on Lung Cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape│Oct 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Inflammatory Protein Linked to Lung Cancer

While inflammation is part of the normal immune response, chronic inflammation is linked to many diseases, including cancer. Now, new research shows that white blood cells near non-small cell lung cancers have high levels of a protein that amplifies inflammation. Called TREM-1, this protein is not found in white blood cells from normal lung tissue. These findings were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians. TREM-1 has also been linked to liver cancer and some breast cancers; researchers suspect that this protein helps tumor cells invade tissue and spread to other parts of the body. In addition, recent research shows that TREM-1 can be inhibited with prostaglandins, which are antiinflammatory biomolecules that promote healing.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape│Oct 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Test for Hard-to-ID Cancers That Have Spread

Test for Hard-to-ID Cancers That Have Spread | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

While identifying cancer types is key to proper treatment, this can be difficult once tumors have spread. Each year, more than 400,000 people in the U.S. have cancers that spread, and the diagnosis is uncertain in about 30% of them. Now, more people will have access to a test that classifies tumors based on the expression of 92 genes. Called CancerTYPE ID, the test will be used by Mayo Medical Laboratories, which serves the Mayo Clinic as well as more than 5,000 other hospitals worldwide. The test can distinguish more than 50 types of cancer, including tumors that are easily confused, such as breast, cervical, endometrial, and ovarian.

Cancer Commons's insight:

bioTheranostics│Oct 29, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 30, 2013 4:09 PM

bioTheranostics│Oct 29, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:06 PM

bioTheranostics│Oct 29, 2013

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

'Quality-of-Life' Care Extends Life for People with Cancer

'Quality-of-Life' Care Extends Life for People with Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Improving the quality of life—palliative care—for people with cancer can also increase survival, according a new pilot study. These findings will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 Quality Care Symposium. Palliative care addresses uncontrolled symptoms, helps guide decision-making, and coordinates treatment. This service is underused and the researchers found that routinely offering it to people makes them twice as likely to take advantage of it (82% vs 41%). With palliative care, hospital readmissions dropped from 36% to 17% and hospice use rose from 14% to 25%. Best of all, people who got palliative care lived longer, with the ratio of expected to actual deaths dropping from 1.35 to 0.59.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Mount Sinai Medical Center│Oct 29, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:05 PM

Mount Sinai Medical Center│Oct 29, 2013

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:13 PM

Just as the definition of palliative care has, until recently, had a limited viewpoint of being somehow related to only hospice, tying "quality of life" to palliative care can lead to similar limitations. 

 

Quality of life must include ALL areas of life, not just medical symptoms or health challenges.  Often stress, anxiety and worries come from the impact cancer has on other areas such as finances, relationships, career and more. 

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:13 PM

Just as the definition of palliative care has, until recently, had a limited viewpoint of being somehow related to only hospice, tying "quality of life" to palliative care can lead to similar limitations. 

 

Quality of life must include ALL areas of life, not just medical symptoms or health challenges.  Often stress, anxiety and worries come from the impact cancer has on other areas such as finances, relationships, career and more.

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

New Way to Find and Kill Cancer Cells

New Way to Find and Kill Cancer Cells | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A tiny new particle could pack a powerful anticancer punch, promising to speed diagnosis and pinpoint drug delivery. Conventional nanoparticles can only carry cancer-fighting materials on their surfaces, limiting their effectiveness. In contrast, the new 'Janus' nanoparticle has a porous interior that lets it carry cancer tests and treatments at the same time. Other uses for the new particle include delivering fluorescent dyes to illuminate cancer cells, making them easier for surgeons to find. This technological advance was presented at the 2013 Materials Science & Technology Conference in Canada.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Daily│Oct 28, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:21 PM

Science Daily│Oct 28, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 12:04 PM

Science Daily│Oct 28, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer

Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new test for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients may help guide treatment decisions. The myPlan Lung Cancer test analyzes gene expression in patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma, a type of NSCLC, to predict their chances of dying within the next 5 years. A study showed that patients with a high-risk myPlan Lung Cancer score had nearly double the risk of death (35%) than patients with a low-risk score (18%). myPlan Lung Cancer results were better predictors of survival than cancer stage; tumor size; or the patient's age, sex, or smoking status. More accurate risk predictions could help identify early-stage NSCLC patients for whom aggressive treatment after surgery would be advisable despite the possibility of side effects.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch | Oct 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Cancer Drug ADI-PEG 20 May 'Starve Out' Mesothelioma

New Cancer Drug ADI-PEG 20 May 'Starve Out' Mesothelioma | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Early promising results are emerging for ADI-PEG 20, a new cancer drug that breaks down arginine. Arginine is an amino acid—a building block for proteins—that is necessary for cell function. Normal cells can produce their own arginine, but many tumor cells cannot. By depriving the body of arginine, ADI-PEG selectively disrupts cancer cells. In a phase II clinical trial, ADI-PEG prolonged the time without cancer progression in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, a type of lung cancer. Almost half of the patients had a partial response to the drug, defined as their tumors shrinking at least 30%.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Yahoo! Finance | Oct. 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Gilotrif Shows Effectiveness in Various Patient Populations with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

Afatinib (Gilotrif) is a new lung cancer drug for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene. The LUX-Lung 3 clinical trial demonstrated that Gilotrif is superior to chemotherapy as first-line treatment in a global population of patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC. The LUX-Lung 6 trial confirmed these findings specifically in an Asian population; Asia has a three times higher rate of EGFR-mutant NSCLC than Western countries. More recent evidence indicates that Gilotrif is as effective in patients with rare EGFR mutations as it is in those with common mutations. Finally, Gilotrif recently showed effectiveness in NSCLC patients whose cancer had spread to the brain.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Moneylife | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Early Evidence Supports CO-1686 as a Treatment Option in Drug-Resistant EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

Early Evidence Supports CO-1686 as a Treatment Option in Drug-Resistant EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Drugs known as EGFR inhibitors—such as erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), and afatinib (Gilotrif)—are very effective in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the EGFR gene. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance, usually caused by new EGFR mutations. T790M is the most common EGFR drug resistance mutation. CO-1686 is a novel drug that inhibits EGFR with the T790M mutation, as well as other mutant EGFR. A small study showed that eight of nine patients who had the T790M resistance mutation experienced more than 10% tumor shrinkage when treated with CO-1686. And, a new formulation of CO-1686 has been found to produce higher, more consistent, well-tolerated drug concentrations in patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Yahoo! Finance | Oct 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Immune System Marker May Help Diagnose Lung Cancer and Predict Outcomes

Immune System Marker May Help Diagnose Lung Cancer and Predict Outcomes | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A recent study found that the complement system, a part of the body's immune response, is activated in lung tumors. Levels of C4d, a breakdown product of the complement system, were elevated in tissue and fluid samples from lung cancer patients. C4d elevation was specific for lung cancer and was not observed in patients with non-cancer lung diseases. More advanced lung cancer was associated with higher C4d levels, but even early-stage lung cancer patients had elevated Cd4 levels. Moreover, higher C4d levels in tumor tissue and blood were associated with shorter survival, even after controlling for cancer stage. C4d blood levels fell after surgical removal of lung tumors. C4d may therefore help diagnose lung cancer, predict outcomes, and monitor response to lung cancer treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medwire News | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.