Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find
3.6K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Cancer Commons
onto Lung Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients

Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, has signed an exclusive world-wide licensing agreement with MedVax Technologies, Inc., for the licensing of groundbreaking cancer peptide vaccine technologies.


"The anticancer vaccine technologies are designed for the treatment and prevention of cancers associated with the HER2 protein. These include breast, ovarian, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The commitment by MedVax will allow innovative clinical trials for various cancers to be conducted in the near future."


Editor's Note: Cancer vaccines are a type of "immune therapy," which means that they boost a patient's immune system to fight cancer. To learn more about immune therapies for lung cancer, read our blog feature on the topic.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 18, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

No Survival Benefit of Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Partial Pleurectomy vs Talc Pleurodesis in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

"In light of nonrandomized studies suggesting benefit of video-assisted thoracoscopic partial pleurectomy (VAT-PP) in symptom control and survival, Rintoul et al performed a randomized trial (MesoVATS) of VAT-PP vs talc pleurodesis in malignant pleural mesothelioma. As reported in The Lancet, this UK study showed no survival improvement, more frequent complications, and longer hospital stay with VAT-PP."


Editor's note: A study with volunteer mesothelioma patients aimed to compare two treatments: video-assisted thoracoscopic partial pleurectomy (VAT-PP) and talc pleurodesis. All patients in the trial had malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion. The researchers wished to figure out which treatment was better in terms of symptom control and survival. They found that, between the two treatments, there was no significant difference in the number of patients still alive one year later. Also, patients treated with VAT-PP had more frequent complications and longer hospital stays.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  Jul 7, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients

Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Clovis Oncology has launched the TIGER2 study for its non-small cell lung cancer drug CO-1686, an agent the company is studying as a treatment for advanced patients with tumors characterized by EGFR mutations and the T790M resistance mutation.


"CO-1686 is an irreversible EGFR inhibitor. Clovis this week said it has dosed the first patient in the TIGER2 Phase I/II trial, which is focused on gauging the efficacy of CO-1686 in NSCLC patients who have progressed on their first and only anti-EGFR treatment."

Editor's note: Some people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have tumor cells with mutations in the EGFR gene (oncologists often use a tumor biopsy to check for this mutation in a patient). These patients can be treated with targeted drugs known as EGFR inhibitors. EGFR inhibitors can shrink tumors at first, but over time, tumors may become resistant to the drugs and start growing again. Often, this is because of a new, additional mutation that occurs in the EGFR gene called T790M. A new clinical trial is enrolling volunteer patients with the T790M mutation to test a new drug meant to overcome EGFR inhibitor resistance. The drug is called CO1-686.
Cancer Commons's insight:

Pharmacogenomics Reporter  |  Jun 25, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC

Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan outperformed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy in patients with sensitive relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a Japanese trial, though there was substantially increased toxicity with the regimen.


“ 'Topotecan is the only drug approved in the United States and the European Union for relapsed SCLC,' said Koichi Goto, MD, PhD, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East in Chiba, Japan. He presented results of the new trial at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. Sensitive relapse refers to cancers that respond to initial chemotherapy and relapse more than 3 months after completion of that therapy, while refractory cancers do not respond initially or relapse within that 3 month window."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test a new treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The new treatment is specifically for people with SCLC who were treated with chemotherapy successfully, but whose cancer returned more than 3 months after chemo—this is known as "sensitive relapsed SCLC." The new treatment combines three chemo drugs: cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan. In the clinical trial, some patients took the chemo combo and some were treated with the chemo drug topotecan, which is a standard treatment for the condition. Patients who took the new treatment lived longer, but they had more toxic side effects than the patients who took topotecan.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network  |  Jun 23, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer

A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Only 15% of patients with squamous cell lung cancer – the second most common lung cancer – survive five years past diagnosis. Little is understood about how the deadly disease arises, preventing development of targeted therapies that could serve as a second line of defense once standard chemotherapy regimens fail.


"Published online in Cell Reports on June 19, Huntsman Cancer Institute investigators report that misregulation of two genes, sox2 and lkb1, drives squamous cell lung cancer in mice. The discovery uncovers new treatment strategies, and provides a clinically relevant mouse model in which to test them."


Editor's note: Some tumors have specific genetic mutations that can allow them to be treated with drugs known as targeted therapies. Studying mice with squamous cell lung cancer tumors, scientists have now discovered two new tumor mutations that open up the possibility for new drugs to be developed for humans. The mutations also indicate that some drugs that already exist for other cancers may be used to treat people with squamous cell lung cancer. More investigation is required before the results of these findings might translate to treatments for patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 19, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment

FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA has issued an alert to health care professionals that docetaxel contains ethanol, which may cause patients to experience intoxication during and after treatment.


"The FDA is currently revising the labels of all docetaxel drug products to warn about this potential risk. Health care professionals should consider the alcohol content of docetaxel when prescribing or administering the drug to patients, especially in those whom alcohol intake should be avoided or reduced and when using it concomitantly with other medications."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 11:00 AM

Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 11:00 AM

Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Breathalyzer Test May Detect Deadliest Cancer

Breathalyzer Test May Detect Deadliest Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Lung cancer causes more deaths in the US than the next three most common cancers combined. Now a new breathalyzer test, embedded with a 'NaNose' nanotech chip to literally 'sniff out' cancer tumors, has been developed by a team of international researchers. It may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  Jun 18, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates? | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.


"Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ."

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 18, 10:20 AM

MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 18, 10:20 AM

MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Study Aims to Rapidly Test Lung Cancer Drugs

New Study Aims to Rapidly Test Lung Cancer Drugs | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A bold new way to test cancer drugs started Monday in hundreds of hospitals around the U.S. In a medical version of speed dating, doctors will sort through multiple experimental drugs and match patients to the one most likely to succeed based on each person's unique tumor gene profile.


"It's a first-of-a-kind experiment that brings together five drug companies, the government, private foundations and advocacy groups. The idea came from the federal Food and Drug Administration, which has agreed to consider approving new medicines based on results from the study.


"Its goal is to speed new treatments to market and give seriously ill patients more chances to find something that will help. Instead of being tested for individual genes and trying to qualify for separate clinical trials testing single drugs, patients can enroll in this umbrella study, get full gene testing and have access to many options at once."


Editor's note: Many patients enroll in clinical trials as volunteers to test new drugs they wouldn't otherwise be able to get. But it can be difficult for patients to enroll on clinical trials, and even more difficult to enroll in ones that do a good job of taking into account the specific molecular characteristics of a patients' tumor(s). Other aspects of traditional clinical trials make them inefficient and expensive, and it can take a long time for useful insights to emerge. The study described in this article attempts to overhaul clinical trial design for people with with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Each patient will have his or her tumor(s) checked for 200 specific mutations. Based on the combination of mutations, his or her oncologist will then be able to request certain experimental drugs for the patient to try. This will hopefully let more patients access their best treatment options faster, and it will allow oncologists to learn more rapidly about the effectiveness of different drugs in different patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The New York Times  |  Jun 16, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Improved Diagnostic Performance of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening

Improved Diagnostic Performance of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Investigators of the COSMOS (Continuous Observation of SMOking Subjects) study show good compliance and patient survival outcomes using a 5-year low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening protocol in individuals at high-risk of developing lung cancer. This protocol had fewer patients requiring further diagnostic follow-up compared to other studies, including the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST), with a minimal number of incorrect diagnoses."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 16, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results from the DELTA trial indicate no significant differences in progression-free (PF) or overall survival (OS) after treatment with docetaxel versus erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients unselected for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status.


"By contrast, in the subgroup of patients whose tumours were positive for EGFR mutations, PFS and OS were nonsignificantly longer in the erlotinib than the docetaxel group, whereas in those with wild-type tumours, docetaxel was significantly superior to erlotinib in terms of PFS, observe the researchers in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Editor's note: This story discusses the results of a clinical trial comparing the targeted drug erlotinib (aka Tarceva) with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel in volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the trial, patients whose tumors had mutations in the EGFR gene benefitted more from erlotinib than docetaxel, while patients without EGFR mutations (as detected by molecular testing) had better results from docetaxel.

Cancer Commons's insight:

medwireNews  |  Jun 13, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer

Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers have taken the next step in confirming the identity of previously unknown gene mutation that drives lung cancer development. Scientists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) originally identified the mutation in one patient out of nine with advanced lung cancer who responded well to the drug sorafenib. The clinical trial involved 306 participants total.


"Within two months of beginning treatment, the patient had demonstrated a near complete response, and she remained progression-free and asymptomatic for five years while continuing to take sorafenib by mouth."


Editor's note: Different patients' tumors have different genetic mutations. More and more, doctors are using patients' tumor genetics to match patients with treatments that are most likely to work for them. Now, researchers have discovered a mutation called S214C, which may help doctors predict some lung cancer patients' responses to treatment. The mutation was found in a patient in a clinical trial who responded particularly well to a drug called sorafenib.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don't always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.


"The study examined data from more than 1100 people aged 50 and older who made decisions about whether to undergo screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or prostate cancer in the previous 2 years. Participants were asked whether their physicians discussed the pros and cons of screening and of forgoing screening, and if they had been given a choice whether or not to be screened."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:31 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:31 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm

Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the first phase III trial assessing the combination of an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced nonadenocarcinoma non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the addition of the fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody figitumumab to paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve overall survival over chemotherapy alone. The study, reported by Langer et al in Journal of Clinical Oncology, was stopped early due to futility and an increased frequency of serious adverse events, including treatment-related death, in patients receiving figitumumab."


Editor's note: In a clinical trial with volunteer patients, a new drug called figitumumab did not show any benefits over standard chemotherapy. The clinical trial was stopped earlier than scheduled because of serious side effects of fogitumumab, including, for some patients, death.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  Jun 12, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Surgical Biopsy Proves Safe for Selected Late-Stage Lung Cancer Patients

Surgical Biopsy Proves Safe for Selected Late-Stage Lung Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers at UC Davis have determined that surgical biopsies can be safely performed on select patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer, which should enhance their access to drugs that target specific genetic mutations such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).


"The findings, published in the July issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, address a common problem in treatment for advanced lung cancer: insufficient tumor tissue available for molecular analysis, which is required before prescribing targeted therapy."


Editor's note: Surgical biopsies (removal of a small sample of a tumor) are used by doctors to figure out if a patient's tumor has certain genetic mutations. A tumor's genetic mutations can help determine which treatments are most likely to work. Some doctors are reluctant to take surgical biopsies from patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because of concerns that dangerous complications will arise. But a new study found that, with careful expert review and good surgical approaches, certain late-stage patients can safely have surgical biopsies.

Cancer Commons's insight:

UC Davis  |  Jun 26, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC

Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Poor baseline quality-of-life scores did not predict worse survival outcomes among patients undergoing non–small cell lung cancer surgery who were at high risk for adverse events.


"In a randomized, multicenter trial, Hiran C. Fernando, MD, chief of the division of thoracic surgery at Boston Medical Center, evaluated 212 patients with NSCLC who were randomly assigned to undergo sublobar resection or sublobar resection with brachytherapy."


Editor's note: This story describes a study that tracked the quality of life of volunteers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were undergoing surgery to remove their tumors and who were at high risk for harmful side effects of the surgery. The study aimed to determine if low quality of life before surgery was linked with worse outcomes of the surgery. Contrary to previous studies, this study found that poor quality of life did not predict poor surgical outcomes.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Jun 24, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The presence of a six-gene profile in the microRNA of patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts reduced survival likelihood after first-line treatment with targeted therapy followed by chemotherapy for disease progression, indicate research results.


"While the findings 'should be further validated', the researchers believe their analysis 'supports the hypothesis that circulating [microRNA's] may further be developed as predictive markers for EGFR-targeted treatment' in an NSCLC population whose response to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors is unknown."


Editor's note: This story describes a new, blood test-based method by which oncologists may be able to predict the effects of targeted therapy treatment on the survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it may be able to predict the effects of first-line treatment with drugs known as EGFR inhibitors, which are prescribed to people whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In a study with volunteer patients, scientists took blood samples just before and just after the patients began taking the drugs bevacizumab or erlotinib. The scientists identified six different kinds of a molecule called microRNA that, if present, were associated with a lower chance of survival (29 months versus more than 45 months). More testing will be needed to determine if this six-gene signature can be used widely; it would be a non-invasive alternative to making predictions and monitoring treatment effectiveness using repeat tumor biopsies.

Cancer Commons's insight:

medwireNews  |  June 20, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC

Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The addition of ramucirumab to docetaxel improved outcomes over placebo with docetaxel as a second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to results of the REVEL trial presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago.


“ 'Despite advancements in genomics and identification of predictive biomarkers such as EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangement, there is still no… targeted therapy for the majority of patients with squamous and non-squamous carcinoma,' said Maurice Pérol, MD, of the Cancer Research Center of Lyon in France. Ramucirumab specifically targets VEGFR-2 and inhibits angiogenesis, and it has been shown to improve outcomes in gastric cancer as monotherapy."


Editor's note: This article describes a treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that combines a new targeted drug called ramucirumab with the standard chemotherapy drug docetaxel. In a clinical trial to test the treatment in volunteer patients who had already received one previous treatment, it was found that ramucirumab plus docetaxel provided better patient outcomes than docetaxel plus a placebo.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network  |  Jun 19, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

New Tool Predicts Financial Pain for Cancer Patients

New Tool Predicts Financial Pain for Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In an online report in the journal Cancer, a team of University of Chicago cancer specialists have described the first tool—11 questions, assembled and refined from conversations with more than 150 patients with advanced cancer—to measure a patient’s risk for, and ability to tolerate, financial stress. The researchers refer to the expense, anxiety, and loss of confidence confronting cancer patients who face large, unpredictable costs, often compounded by decreased ability to work, as “financial toxicity,” and they have named their patient-reported outcome measure COST (COmprehensive Score for financial Toxicity)."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  Jun 20, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 10:55 AM

The ASCO Post  |  Jun 20, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 10:56 AM

The ASCO Post  |  Jun 20, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Study Investigates Online Information Available to Lung Cancer Patients

Study Investigates Online Information Available to Lung Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers from The University of Manchester have begun a study to look at the online information available to lung cancer patients in an era of diagnosis by google.


"Lung cancer affects around 41,000 people in the UK each year and has one of the lowest survival rates of any cancer, which experts think is partly because people do not get treatment early enough or recognise the symptoms.


"The Medical Research Council-funded study will include a systematic review of the information about lung cancer currently available online to see how this can be improved."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 19, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

More than 130 Lawmakers Urge Coverage for Lung Cancer Test that Could Cost Medicare Billions

More than 130 Lawmakers Urge Coverage for Lung Cancer Test that Could Cost Medicare Billions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"More than 130 lawmakers are urging the Obama administration to expand coverage for a lung-cancer test under Medicare that could cost the program billons, calling the screening important for vulnerable seniors.

"In a letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the lawmakers called for a timely decision on coverage for low-dose CT scans for older patients at higher risk of developing lung cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

StarTribune  |  Jun 17, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

No Long-Term Anxiety or Distress Associated with Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening

No Long-Term Anxiety or Distress Associated with Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Examination and review of several studies that evaluated patient-centered outcomes for individuals undergoing low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer found that screening does not appear to significantly influence overall health-related quality of life or result in long-term changes in anxiety or distress, but that positive results in the short-term, do increase distress levels."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 16, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

What Cancer Costs You Later: $4,000 a Year

What Cancer Costs You Later: $4,000 a Year | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Having cancer is bad enough. And the lifetime consequences have been well-documented — a higher risk of other cancers, heart disease and general weakness from the treatment.


"Now a new federal study shows there’s a financial burden too — on average, $4,000 a year for men and $3,000 for women over and above what people who haven’t had cancer spend.


"And that’s just direct medical costs. Cancer survivors also have thousands in lost productivity, from having to cut work hours or even quit their jobs, the report finds."

Cancer Commons's insight:

NBC News  |  Jun 12, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 16, 11:20 AM

NBC News  |  Jun 12, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 16, 11:20 AM

NBC News  |  Jun 12, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

An Innovative Pain Treatment Will be Tested in One of the Largest Clinical Trials in Cancer Pain

"More than 500 patients who suffer from severe chronic pain related to cancer can participate in one of the largest trials in cancer pain in 145 hospitals spread over 21 countries worldwide.


"Many cancer patients suffer from severe chronic pain related to their cancer. Unfortunately many of these patients are not satisfied with their current treatment options for the management of their pain due to the limitations of these treatments.[1] The German pharmaceutical company Grünenthal is investigating the efficacy and safety of the new analgesic cebranopadol for the treatment of severe chronic pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. Patients suffering from cancer-related severe pain are encouraged to check if they qualify to participate in a large cancer pain phase III trial, the so-called CORAL trial. The CORAL trial aims to show that the investigational drug cebranopadol can provide equally strong analgesia as a standard strong opioid in cancer patients while causing considerably fewer side effects. As the first trial of cebranopadol's phase III clinical program, referred to as the OCEANIC PROGRAM(R), Grünenthal will start the CORAL trial in 145 hospitals spread over 21 countries, including the United Kingdom. More than 500 patients are planned to complete this trial by 2016. More information about the CORAL trial and participating hospitals is available athttp://www.oceanic-program.com."


Editor's note: Clinical trials are research studies with volunteer patients. Learn more about them.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 16, 10:44 AM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 16, 10:45 AM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Uutilizing Genetic Health Care Professional Reduces Unnecessary Testing, Study Shows

Uutilizing Genetic Health Care Professional Reduces Unnecessary Testing, Study Shows | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures.


"Up to 10 percent of cancers are inherited, meaning a person was born with an abnormal gene that increases their risk for cancer. "Pre-test genetic counseling in which a health care provider takes a thorough family history and discusses the potential risks and benefits of genetic testing is standard of care as recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and National Society of Genetic Counselors," said Tuya Pal, M.D., a board-certified geneticist at Moffitt and senior author of the paper."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:44 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:44 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

A Wide Variety of Cancers Imaged and Treated with New Tumor-Targeting Agent

"Scientists at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) report that a new class of tumor-targeting agents can seek out and find dozens of solid tumors, even illuminating brain cancer stem cells that resist current treatments.


"What's more, years of animal studies and early human clinical trials show that this tumor-targeting, alkylphosphocholine (APC) molecule can deliver two types of 'payloads' directly to cancer cells: a radioactive or fluorescent imaging label, or a radioactive medicine that binds and kills cancer cells.


"The results are reported in today's issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, and featured in the journal's cover illustration and podcast."


Editor's note: This story discusses a new method to make cancer cells visible to oncologists, and to deliver drugs directly to cells. The method uses a molecule called APC, which makes a beeline for cancer cells and can deliver imaging labels or radiotherapy treatments.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:29 AM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 11:29 AM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014