Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find
2.8K views | +0 today
Suggested by Cancer Commons
onto Lung Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Reevaluating the 5-Year Cancer Survival Milestone

Reevaluating the 5-Year Cancer Survival Milestone | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Reaching 5 years without a relapse is considered a significant milestone by many cancer patients, sometimes dubbed a 'cancerversary.' The importance attached to the 5-year mark originates from the evaluation of blood cancers in the 1930s. At the time, these cancers were frequently and rapidly lethal. Patients who managed to survive for 5 years could reasonably be considered cured. Over time, the 5-year criterion expanded to all other cancer types, although its applicability varies. For some cancers, the likelihood of a recurrence indeed drops drastically after 5, or even just 2 years without a relapse. For other cancer types, such as breast cancer, the probability of a recurrence does not decrease significantly, even after many disease-free years. However, even without strong statistical implications, reaching the 5-year milestone holds personal meaning for many cancer patients as an occasion for celebration or reflection.

Cancer Commons's insight:

New York Times  |  Dec 6, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Cancer ‘Miracle’ Patients Studied Anew for Disease Clues

Cancer ‘Miracle’ Patients Studied Anew for Disease Clues | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The history of oncology is rife with reports of patients with advanced cancer who staged miraculous recoveries.


"Now scientists are starting to use sophisticated DNA sequencing technology to determine if these “exceptional responders” carry gene variations that can lead to new treatment approaches, better targeted therapies or even the re-emergence of experimental drugs once deemed failures.


"The mystery surrounding Jan Crisitello, a 70-year-old grandmother of four, is a case in point. Five years ago, 29 patients with advanced melanoma enrolled in a trial of a drug under development by Pfizer Inc. (PFE) Only one, Crisitello, came away with her cancer in remission. Now, she is being studied to see how her unique genome may have interacted with the drug to spur her recovery."


Editor's note: To learn more about personalized medicine, click here.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 11, 2:39 PM

Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 11, 2:39 PM

Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Among patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer without a mutation of a certain gene, conventional chemotherapy, compared with treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, was associated with improvement in survival without progression of the cancer, but not with overall survival, according to a study."


Editor's note: The drugs discussed in this story, "epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors," are targeted therapies that are used to treat lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Scientists wanted to find out whether the drugs could also help patients without EGFR mutations. However, it was found that the drugs were no more effective than chemotherapy in improving patients' overall survival. This supports the idea that EGFR inhibitor drugs should only be given to patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  Apr 8, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Study Identifies Potential Predictor of Clinical Outcome in Patients With Lung Cancer Treated With the Investigational Immunotherapy MK-3475

Study Identifies Potential Predictor of Clinical Outcome in Patients With Lung Cancer Treated With the Investigational Immunotherapy MK-3475 | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the investigational immune checkpoint inhibitor MK-3475, those whose tumors had high levels of the protein PD-L1 had significantly better outcomes, according to results of a phase I clinical trial presented here at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, April 5-9.

"Preliminary data from the trial, which were reported earlier this year, showed that MK-3475 treatment was well tolerated and led to durable, objective responses in previously treated patients with NSCLC, particularly those with tumors found to have high levels of PD-L1 prior to treatment. 

"The latest results extend these data, showing that at six months after starting treatment, 41 percent of patients whose tumors had high levels of PD-L1 had no disease progression, compared with 17 percent of those whose tumors had low levels of PD-L1. Similarly, 72 percent of patients whose tumors had high levels of PD-L1 were alive at this time, compared with 53 percent of those whose tumors had low levels of PD-L1."


Editor's note: MK-3475 is an immunotherapy drug, which means it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. This study found that it was more effective in patients whose tumors had high levels of the protein PD-L1, as detected by molecular testing. To learn more about immunotherapy treatments for lung cancer, visit this blog post.

Cancer Commons's insight:

AACR  |  Apr 6, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Cancer Patients Face Treatment Disruptions Come June; Immediate and Severe Funding Cuts May Curtail Access to Cancer Clinical Trials

"The nation’s cancer clinical trial network, which provides care to thousands of patients across the United States, may have no choice but to abandon life-saving and life-extending research studies, including support for patients participating in those studies, due to crippling proposed budget cuts. For decades, federally-supported clinical trials have produced critical advances in the fight against cancer, representing one of the greatest returns on research investment anywhere. But this progress could soon grind to a halt due to far-reaching—and largely unnoticed—budgeting decisions that are happening in plain sight."


Editor's note: Clinical trials are not only important for testing the safety and effectiveness of new drugs; they also provide an avenue for patients who cannot benefit from standard treatment options to access new, cutting-edge treatments that could help them. In fact, our founder's life was saved by his involvement in a clinical trial.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2:06 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2:07 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Multimodal Approach Appears Promising for Treatment of Cancer Cachexia

Multimodal Approach Appears Promising for Treatment of Cancer Cachexia | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cancer cachexia is a complex, multifactorial metabolic syndrome characterized by weight and muscle loss with or without loss of fat mass.


"It occurs in 30% to 80% of patients with cancer, and it is identified as an independent predictor of shorter survival and increased risk for treatment failure and toxicity...


"Due to the lack of selectivity of anabolic androgens, a need for more selective anabolic agents has emerged, resulting in the development of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). These agents have the potential to elicit beneficial anabolic effects while avoiding many of the side effects observed with steroidal agents."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Mar 10, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 1:59 PM

Healio  |  Mar 10, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2:00 PM

Healio  |  Mar 10, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Team Identifies Novel Biomarker for Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Team Identifies Novel Biomarker for Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A team led by a scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has identified a new biomarker linked to better outcomes of patients with head and neck cancers and non-small cell lung cancer. The work could help scientists develop new diagnostics and therapies and help physicians determine the best long-term treatments for patients with these cancers.


"The findings, which were published this week online ahead of print by the journal Cancer, focus on a protein called Choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase-α CCT-α or CCTα, an 'antigen' that prompts the immune system to produce antibodies against it."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Scripps Research Institute  |  Apr 2, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

GSK Pulls Plug on Late-Stage Lung Cancer Trial

GSK Pulls Plug on Late-Stage Lung Cancer Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"GlaxoSmithKline has been forced to halt a Phase III trial assessing its MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).


"High hopes for the experimental immunotherapy - designed to help patients stave off the return of the disease after treatment - came after it emerged that researchers would not be able to identify a subset of patients who may benefit from its therapy, hot on the heels of other disappointing data."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy drugs are meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. We previously posted about the immunotherapy drug MAGE-A3. Even though it did not perform very well when tested in a clinical trial, researchers hoped to find a subset of patients who could benefit. However, it seems they could not.

Cancer Commons's insight:

PharmaTimes  |  Apr 2, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period

Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Race-based differences in cancer survival have not changed over time, and the disparities among black patients persist independent of treatment and disease stage, study results showed.


"Ayal A. Aizer, MD, MHS, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues used the SEER database to identify 2.7 million patients diagnosed with lung, breast, prostate or colorectal cancers between 1988 and 2007. The final analysis included more than 1 million patients."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 2, 4:19 PM

Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 2, 4:19 PM

Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Innate Pharma SA begins Phase I Trial with Lirilumab and Nivolumab in Selected Solid Tumors Under Cohort Expansion

"Biopharmaceutical company Innate Pharma SA (euronext paris:FR0010331421) reported on Monday that it has started the cohort expansion portion of the Phase I clinical trial testing the combination of the two investigational checkpoint inhibitors lirilumab and nivolumab in selected solid tumors...


"The company said the trial will test lirilumab (anti-KIR checkpoint inhibitor; BMS-986015) in combination with nivolumab (anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor BMS-936558) in solid tumors. The Phase I open label study will evaluate the safety of the combination of lirilumab and nivolumab and to provide preliminary information on the clinical activity of the combination. The primary outcome is safety."


Editor's note: Nivolumab is an immunotherapy drug that activates the immune system's T cells in the hopes that the patient's own immune system will be prompted to fight tumors. Nivolumab has already been shown to be a promising melanoma treatment on its own. Lirilumab is a drug that activates a different group of immune system cells known as natural killer cells (NK). This clinical trial combines both drugs to see if they work better together.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MENAFN  |  Mar 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts

Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the phase II Tailored Postsurgical Therapy in Early-Stage NSCLC (TASTE) trial (IFCT-0801), reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Wislez et al examined the feasibility of customized adjuvant treatment based on EGFR mutation status and expression of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1), a predictor of cisplatin response, in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although the trial met its primary endpoint of ≥ 80% of patients being able to start adjuvant chemotherapy within 2 months of surgery, a phase III trial of the customized approach was cancelled due to unreliability of ERCC1 immunohistochemical readouts."


Editor's note: This trial tested whether a particular molecular testing method could be used to decide which lung cancer patients might benefit from chemotherapy after surgery to keep the cancer from returning. While the results of the trial were promising, the third phase of the trial was canceled because of some unreliability of the molecular testing method. Another method called Pervenio, already performs a similar function.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  Mar 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Gene May Predict if Further Cancer Treatments are Needed

Gene May Predict if Further Cancer Treatments are Needed | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A new predictive tool that could help patients with breast cancer and certain lung cancers decide whether follow-up treatments are likely to help is being developed by researchers. The findings offer insight into helping patients assess treatment risk. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy that can destroy tumors also can damage surrounding healthy tissue. So with an appropriate test, patients could avoid getting additional radiation or chemotherapy treatment they may not need."


Editor's note: This study was performed in mice, so it will be several years before patients can benefit from it. However, doctors are already using molecular testing to guide treatment decisions, often for patients with advanced lung cancer. For early-stage patients, the Pervenio test can help determine whether lung cancer is likely to return after surgery, which can let doctors know to consider preventive ("adjuvant") treatments.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  Mar 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

NCCN to Host Policy Summit Concerning Biomarkers and Targeted Therapies in Clinical Trial Design

"With cancer increasingly recognized as being comprised of many subtypes differentiated by specific molecular profiles, identifying the most effective combination therapies is challenging. Defining appropriate patient subsets, selecting agents active against specific targets, predicting effective therapeutic combinations, and appropriately interpreting clinical trial results are significant problems for pharmaceutical companies, clinicians, statisticians, and regulators. These issues will need to be addressed in order to meet the needs of people with cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

NCCN  |  Mar 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ELCC 2014 Press Release: Call for More Awareness of Sexual Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

"Many lung cancer patients suffer difficulties with sexual expression and intimacy, yet for too long the topic has been ignored by doctors and researchers, experts have said at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).


“ 'It’s time that doctors and scientists paid more attention to this important issue,' said Stephane Droupy from the University Hospital of Nimes, France, speaking at a special session on sexual dysfunction after lung cancer treatment at ELCC."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ESMO  |  Mar 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites."


Editor's note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients' tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 10, 12:08 PM

ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 10, 12:09 PM

ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis.


"Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called 'liquid biopsies.'


"Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces — either intact cancer cells or fragments of tumor DNA — are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 9, 12:48 PM

The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 9, 12:49 PM

The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Roche Lung Cancer Pill Gets Reprieve in UK Reversal

"Britain's health cost watchdog NICE on Friday reversed an earlier decision to limit the use of Roche's Tarceva cancer pill on the state health service in a move the drugmaker said would help around 2,000 patients a year.


"New draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) now backs use of Tarceva for people with non-small-cell lung cancer that has progressed after chemotherapy in wider circumstances than originally suggested."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters  |  Apr 3, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Sorrento Announces Presentation of Data from Clinical Study of Resiniferatoxin for Intractable Cancer Pain at ASRA Meeting - San Francisco Business Times

Sorrento Announces Presentation of Data from Clinical Study of Resiniferatoxin for Intractable Cancer Pain at ASRA Meeting - San Francisco Business Times | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: SRNE; Sorrento) a late-stage clinical oncology company developing new treatments for cancer and its associated pain, today announced that investigators from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) presented data highlighting results from the first two dosing cohorts of the Phase I/II trial of resiniferatoxin (RTX) for the treatment of intractable cancer pain. The data were presented at the 39th Annual Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain Meeting, organized by the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA), in Chicago on April 3, 2014.


"Data from six patients with advanced cancer and severe refractory pain, who received either 13 or 26 mcg injection of RTX into the intrathecal space, showed a clinically meaningful improvement in quality of life following the single injection."

Cancer Commons's insight:

San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2:02 PM

San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2:02 PM

San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Prostate Cancer Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Quick, Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancers Looks Feasible

Quick, Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancers Looks Feasible | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The idea of a general, quick and simple blood test for a diverse range of cancers just came closer to reality with news of a new study published in Nature Medicine.


"Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine have devised an ultra-sensitive method for finding DNA from cancertumors in the bloodstream.


"Previous research has already shown circulating tumor DNA holds promise as a biomarker for cancer, but existing methods for detecting it are not sufficiently sensitive and do not cover a diverse range of cancers.


"Ways to increase the sensitivity and coverage of such tests exist, but these are cumbersome and time-consuming, and need lots of steps to customize for individual patients, so they are not feasible for use in clinics.


"The new approach promises to change that. It is highly sensitive and specific and should be broadly applicable to a range of cancers, say the researchers."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today  |  Apr 7, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 1:52 PM

Medical News Today  |  Apr 7, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 1:53 PM

Medical News Today  |  Apr 7, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Allegro Diagnostics Confirms Clinical Validation of BronchoGen™ Genomic Test for Improved Diagnosis of Lung Cancer in AEGIS-2 Clinical Trial

"Allegro Diagnostics Corp. today announced that the AEGIS-2 clinical trial has met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that the BronchoGen™ genomic test improves the accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis when used in combination with bronchoscopy. BronchoGen is Allegro Diagnostics’ lead genomic test, and it is built upon the company’s molecular testing platform that utilizes gene expression of cytologically normal epithelial cells in the respiratory tract to aid in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Endpoints in the clinical trial include the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value of BronchoGen for identifying patients with malignancy. Complete results from the clinical trial will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal."


Editor's note: Molecular testing of patients' tumor biopsies can be a powerful way to improve diagnosis and guide treatment decisions. Learn more about it.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Business Wire  |  Apr 2, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New General Concept for the Treatment of Cancer

New General Concept for the Treatment of Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A team of researchers from five Swedish universities, led by Karolinska Institutet and the Science for Life Laboratory, have identified a new way of treating cancer. The concept is presented in the journal Nature and is based on inhibiting a specific enzyme called MTH1, which cancer cells, unlike normal cells, require for survival. Without this enzyme, oxidized nucleotides are incorporated into DNA, resulting in lethal DNA double-strand breaks in cancer cells."


Editor's note: As stated in the article, it will be a couple of years before this treatment becomes available to patients in clinical trials. Other "targeted therapies" are already being used to treat cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 2, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 2, 4:22 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 2, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 2, 4:22 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 2, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Deploying the Body's Army

Deploying the Body's Army | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction."


Editor's note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 5:28 PM

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 5:28 PM

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Nintedanib: New Oral Angiogenesis Inhibitor in Lung Cancer

"A new oral angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of lung cancer could be edging closer to the market: Approval application for nintedanib (Boehringer Ingelheim) has been filed in Europe and is being prepared for the United States.


"The data for nintedanib come from the phase 3 trial known as LUME-Lung-1, recently published in the Lancet Oncology."


Editor's note: We previously posted a story about the potential benefits of the drug nintedanib for some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape  |  Mar 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Shift in NSCLC Trial Design, Interpretation Linked to Inefficiency

Shift in NSCLC Trial Design, Interpretation Linked to Inefficiency | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Changes in primary endpoints and an increase in trials that report positive outcomes have coincided with fewer statistically significant endpoint improvements and a decreased net survival benefit among phase 3 randomized controlled trials for non–small cell lung cancer, according to study results.


"Researchers evaluated data from 203 phase 3 randomized control trials of systemic therapy for NSCLC conducted between 1980 and 2010.


"Overall, the size and number of advanced NSCLC trials has increased over time, from 32 trials with a median sample size of 152 patients in the 1980s to 118 trials with a median of 413 patients between 2001 and 2010."


Editor's note: Clinical trials can be important treatment options for patients who cannot benefit from standard treatments. Learn more.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Mar 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One

Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Once you decode a tumor’s genome, what’s next? Oncologists hope that IBM’s Watson will help them find drugs for patients’ particular brain cancer mix...


"When Robert B. Darnell was a graduate student in the early 1980s, he spent a year sequencing a tiny fragment of DNA. Now Dr. Darnell is an oncologist and the president of the New York Genome Center, where the DNA-sequencing machines can decode his grad-school fragment in less than a ten-thousandth of a second."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 1:09 PM

The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 1:09 PM

The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients

ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cabazitaxel failed to meet a primary endpoint of showing superior progression-free survival (PFS) and additionally showed less favourable median overall survival (OS) compared to topotecan in an international, randomised open-label phase II trial performed in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), who had progressed during or after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The results were presented by Dr Tracey Evans of the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA in a proffered papers session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."


Editor's note: This trial found disappointing results for the drug cabazitaxel in treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC). To read about promising SCLC treatments, see this blog feature.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ESMO  |  Mar 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.