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Cancer Vaccine Could Use Immune System to Fight Tumors

Cancer Vaccine Could Use Immune System to Fight Tumors | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cincinnati Cancer Center (CCC) and UC Cancer Institute researchers have found that a vaccine, targeting tumors that produce a certain protein and receptor responsible for communication between cells and the body's immune system, could initiate the immune response to fight cancer.


"These findings, published in the online edition of the journalGene Therapy, build on previously reported research and could lead to new treatments for cancer."


Editor's Note: This cancer vaccine (interleukin-15, or IL-15) is currently being given to patients in several clinical trials for several different types of cancer. Visit clinicaltrials.gov to learn more.

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 3, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 3, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 3, 2014

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Clinical Trial Continues to Examine Lung Cancer Vaccine

Clinical Trial Continues to Examine Lung Cancer Vaccine | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new phase II/III clinical trial will further investigate the effectiveness of the lung cancer vaccine tergenpumatucel-L (HyperAcute-Lung immunotherapy, or HAL) against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC that has resisted previous treatment will receive either HAL or the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere). HAL consists of lung cancer cells that have been modified to prevent them from growing. A mouse gene has been inserted into these cells, causing them to express a molecule on their surface that human immune systems recognize as foreign. When the cells are injected into humans, they provoke a strong immune response, which stimulates the immune system to also attack the patient’s own lung cancer cells. A previous phase I/II trial of HAL had produced promising results.

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Medical Xpress  |  Dec 19, 2013

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Lung Cancer Vaccine Brought Back for New Clinical Trial

A new clinical trial will reexamine the lung cancer vaccine tecemotide, formerly known as Stimuvax. Tecemotide stimulates the patient's immune system to attack tumor cells. Although the drug previously failed in the START clinical trial, drugmakers reported that later analyses showed that tecemotide increased survival in the subset of patients who had been treated with chemoradiotherapy (simultaneous chemotherapy and radiation therapy, or CRT) before tecemotide. Like START, the new trial, START2, will enroll patients with locally advanced, stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that cannot be removed with surgery. However, START2 will exclusively focus on patients who have previously received CRT.

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Reuters | Sep 25, 2013

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Lung Cancer Vaccine May Increase Effectiveness of Chemotherapy

A phase II clinical trial of a vaccine aimed at treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has yielded promising findings. Tergenpumatucel-L (HyperAcute-Lung immunotherapy, or HAL) consists of genetically modified NSCLC cells that provoke a strong, targeted attack from the immune system. The treatment thus trains the patient’s immune system to attack NSCLC cells. Eight out of 28 patients with advanced NSCLC who received HAL experienced stable disease without further cancer growth. The average survival time for study participants was 11.3 months, which is longer than expected for their disease status, and one patient survived more than 50.0 months. Patients whose cancer progressed after HAL treatment were given chemotherapy. Over half of showed some degree of effectiveness, suggesting that HAL treatment may increase responsiveness to chemotherapy.

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Yahoo! Finance | June 1, 2013

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Clinical Trial to Examine Effectiveness of Lung Cancer Vaccine TG4010 in Select Patients

A new clinical trial will examine the effectiveness of the lung cancer drug TG4010. TG4010 acts like a vaccine: it sensitizes the immune system to MUC1, a protein expressed in high levels on many lung tumor cells, and thus primes the immune system to attack these cancer cells. A previous trial suggested that TG4010 is most likely to be effective in patients with low levels of a certain kind of immune cell called triple-positive activated lymphocytes or TrPAL. In the new trial, patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express high levels of MUC1 and who have low levels of TrPAL will receive either TG4010 or a placebo along with their standard treatment.

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Bloomberg  |  Jan 8, 2014

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FDA Greenlights NSCLC Vaccine Trial for Subgroups

An experimental lung cancer vaccine does not extend life overall, but may still benefit some people, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve further trials for these groups. These findings were reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Called belagenpumatucel-L, the vaccine is based on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and boosts the immune response. The phase III clinical trial included 532 people with NSCLC who had already undergone chemotherapy and the vaccine benefitted two subgroups. People who had previously been treated with radiation lived longer (40 mo with radiation vs 10 mo without radiation), as did people whose lung cancers were not adenocarcinomas (20 mo for nonadenocarcinomas vs 12 mo for adenocarcinomas).

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European Society for Medical Oncology│Sep 28, 2013

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Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies

Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors have been the primary treatment methods for many types of cancer for many years, but new studies may change that. Peptides, proteins made of small chains of 10 to 50 amino acids, are being examined as possible cost-effective, more successful, safer anticancer vaccines. Researchers have identified two regions on the HER1 (also known as the EGFR) protein as possible targets for these peptide-based drugs. These agents could be used in the treatment of lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancers. If successful, the EGFR-targeting peptide vaccines could be combined with immunotherapies for the HER2 and VEGF proteins, possibly reducing the likelihood that the cancer will develop resistance to the treatment, a common pitfall of monoclonal antibody drugs such as cetuximab (Erbitux).

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Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013

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Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013