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Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System

Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results of a new study on mice and a phase 1 trial of humans suggest that prolonged cycles of fasting - for 2-4 days at a time - not only protect against toxic effects of chemotherapy, but also trigger stem cell regeneration of new immune cells and clearing out of old, damaged cells.


"The study, by researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and published in the journalCell Stem Cell, is the first to show that a natural intervention can trigger regeneration of an organ or system through stem cells.


"The team believes the findings could benefit people with immune system damage, for example if they have received chemotherapy treatment for cancer. It could also benefit the elderly whose immune systems are weakened through aging, making them more susceptible to disease."

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:39 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:39 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 7, 2014 1:13 PM

Intuitively this week, my body felt like it needed to fast.  Intuitively, even thought I'd only planned a two day juice fast, it turned into four.  With the right plan for fasting, and doctor's supervision as needed depending on your state of health or knowledge about how to fast correctly, it is highly doable.  

 

I use a company that specializes in juicing and provides a whole kit of raw juices designed to give me different nutrients at different times of the day and it's all organic.  I was never hungry and only had one afternoon dealing with a detox headache from going off caffeine. The rest of the time I was completely energized.  Returning to food now, my body is craving raw vegetables and has no desire for caffeine or some of the other nutritional "slips" into foods that aren't healthy for me.

 

Amazing to see more natural paths to healing being embraced by the medical community.  Medical interventions are sometimes very necessary and so I am grateful that we have them.  It's not an either/or...it's an and - how can more "traditional" medical approaches and some natural approaches work together for best outcomes...that's an exciting place to be.

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Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness

Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Our bodies follow a 24-hour 'biorhythm' that affects most of our biological functions. This fact forms the basis of cancer chronotherapy, which takes time of day into account to plan cancer treatment. Administering cancer drugs at the right time can double effectiveness while reducing toxicity up to fivefold. However, individual differences in biorhythms mean that the 'right time' varies from one person to another. In a recent study, researchers linked gene expression in mice with the time point at which the chemotherapy agent irinotecan (Camptosar) produced the least toxicity. They developed a mathematical model that predicts each animal's ideal time point based on the expression of two genes. In the future, they hope to develop similar tools to help predict the best time for cancer treatment in human patients.

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Early Results For New Lung Cancer Immunotherapies Inspire Optimism

Three new immunotherapy drugs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – nivolumab, lambrolizumab (MK-3475), and MPDL-3280A – have produced encouraging early results. All three interfere with PD-1 and PD-L1, molecules that interact to shield tumors from being attacked by the body's immune system. In phase I trials, more than 20% of participants experienced tumor shrinkage in response to each of the three drugs. For these patients, effects tended to be rapid and long-lasting. Most continue to respond favorably to treatment at this time, having been in the trials for up to 7 months (MPDL-3280A), an average of 9 months (lambrolizumab), or an average of 1.5 years and ranging up to 2.5 years (nivolumab). Overall toxicity was acceptable, though some cases of severe side effects were seen, including two deaths with nivolumab.

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Medscape | Oct 31, 2013

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mTOR Inhibitors May Be Associated with Kidney Injury

A class of cancer drugs called mTOR inhibitors may produce kidney toxicity in at least some patients. mTOR inhibitors, including rapamycin (sirolimus/Rapamune), temsirolimus (Torisel), everolimus (Afinitor), and ridaforolimus, are used to treat certain forms of breast and kidney cancer, and are under investigation for several other cancers. Researchers described four cases of patients treated with mTOR inhibitors developing severe acute kidney injury. They recommend that doctors carefully monitor kidney function in patients receiving these drugs. However, other experts emphasize that it is unclear whether the mTOR inhibitors were indeed the cause of the kidney injury. In at least one case, the patient was also taking other drugs known to cause kidney toxicity.

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Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Contrary to Concerns, Drug to Treat Side Effects of Chemoradiotherapy May Not Undermine Treatment

Contrary to Concerns, Drug to Treat Side Effects of Chemoradiotherapy May Not Undermine Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The drug amifostine (Ethyol) reduces toxic side effects of chemotherapy and radiation. However, scientists are concerned that Ethyol may also protect tumors and undermine cancer treatment. To test this, a clinical trial examined the effects of Ethyol in patients with stage II and IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were treated with radiation and chemotherapy simultaneously. Patients who took Ethyol experienced no differences in survival or cancer progression compared to those who did not take Ethyol, suggesting that the drug did not undermine treatment. However, Ethyol did not improve quality of life or reduce throat inflammation during treatment, although it did appear to lessen swallowing difficulties. Not enough patients participated in the study to completely rule out a potential effect of Ethyol on survival.

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Lung Cancer | Mar 11, 2013

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Cyramza Yields a Modest Survival Benefit in Second-line NSCLC

"Cyramza™ (ramucirumab, IMC-1121B; Eli Lilly) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of VEGFR-2. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. On February 19, 2014, Lilly announced via press release that the REVEL trial was positive for both overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III REVEL trial (NCT01168973) were reported at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The trial evaluated docetaxel with or without Cyramza in squamous or non-squamous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following disease progression after one prior platinum-based therapy."


Editor's note: A new targeted drug called Cyramza (aka ramucirumab) shows promise as a potential treatment for people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial, scientists tested the drug on volunteer patients with stage IV NSCLC. Compared to standard chemotherapy alone, patients who were treated with chemo plus Cyramza lived longer and had more time pass before their cancer worsened.

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OBR  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Crizotinib Can Reduce Kidney Function and Testosterone Levels

Crizotinib Can Reduce Kidney Function and Testosterone Levels | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A recent study suggests that crizotinib (Xalkori) can reduce kidney function. Lung cancer patients treated with Xalkori saw their kidney function decrease by 23.9% on average. Kidney function recovered when Xalkori was discontinued. However, as patients usually have to take Xalkori for months or years, these findings still warrant caution, especially in patients taking other medications that affect kidney function or with preexisting kidney damage. In an earlier study, investigators had found that Xalkori decreased testosterone levels in 84% of male patients. Because cancer drugs like Xalkori increasingly receive accelerated approval, not all of their side effects are known by the time they are approved. Doctors therefore need to carefully monitor their patients for possible adverse effects.

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013

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Patient Feedback Can Provide Valuable Evidence about Cancer Treatments

Patient Feedback Can Provide Valuable Evidence about Cancer Treatments | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Findings from a recent clinical trial validate patients as a crucial source of evidence in cancer research. The trial investigated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving chemotherapy plus standard- or high-dose radiotherapy. The high-dose arm of the trial was eventually closed, because its patients had shorter survival than those treated with standard-dose radiation. Notably, health care providers had not reported higher toxicity in high-dose patients. However, patients in this group had reported lower quality of life than those in the standard-dose group, suggesting that patient feedback can pinpoint treatment effects not captured by provider reports. Patients also reported a higher quality of life with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT).

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Medical Xpress | Sep 23, 2013

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Switching from Iressa to Tarceva Halts Drug-Induced Immune Suppression in Lung Cancer Patient

Switching from Iressa to Tarceva Halts Drug-Induced Immune Suppression in Lung Cancer Patient | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Neutropenia (a reduction in white blood cells) is a rare, but potentially serious side effect of the cancer drug gefitinib (Iressa). Iressa is used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the EGFR gene. A patient with EGFR-mutant advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung (a type of NSCLC) was treated with Iressa. Her tumor shrank, but she experienced severe neutropenia, leaving her at risk of dangerous infections. She was switched to erlotinib (Tarceva), another EGFR inhibitor, after which her neutropenia cleared up. The patient has since continued on Tarceva without neutropenia or cancer progression for over nine months. This case suggests that Iressa-induced neutropenia can be safely treated by switching to Tarceva, although caution should be used in drawing conclusions from a single case study.

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Lung Cancer | Mar 14, 2013

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