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No Survival Benefit of Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Partial Pleurectomy vs Talc Pleurodesis in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

"In light of nonrandomized studies suggesting benefit of video-assisted thoracoscopic partial pleurectomy (VAT-PP) in symptom control and survival, Rintoul et al performed a randomized trial (MesoVATS) of VAT-PP vs talc pleurodesis in malignant pleural mesothelioma. As reported in The Lancet, this UK study showed no survival improvement, more frequent complications, and longer hospital stay with VAT-PP."


Editor's note: A study with volunteer mesothelioma patients aimed to compare two treatments: video-assisted thoracoscopic partial pleurectomy (VAT-PP) and talc pleurodesis. All patients in the trial had malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion. The researchers wished to figure out which treatment was better in terms of symptom control and survival. They found that, between the two treatments, there was no significant difference in the number of patients still alive one year later. Also, patients treated with VAT-PP had more frequent complications and longer hospital stays.

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The ASCO Post  |  Jul 7, 2014

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Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC

Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan outperformed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy in patients with sensitive relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a Japanese trial, though there was substantially increased toxicity with the regimen.


“ 'Topotecan is the only drug approved in the United States and the European Union for relapsed SCLC,' said Koichi Goto, MD, PhD, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East in Chiba, Japan. He presented results of the new trial at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. Sensitive relapse refers to cancers that respond to initial chemotherapy and relapse more than 3 months after completion of that therapy, while refractory cancers do not respond initially or relapse within that 3 month window."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test a new treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The new treatment is specifically for people with SCLC who were treated with chemotherapy successfully, but whose cancer returned more than 3 months after chemo—this is known as "sensitive relapsed SCLC." The new treatment combines three chemo drugs: cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan. In the clinical trial, some patients took the chemo combo and some were treated with the chemo drug topotecan, which is a standard treatment for the condition. Patients who took the new treatment lived longer, but they had more toxic side effects than the patients who took topotecan.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 23, 2014

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Study Investigates Online Information Available to Lung Cancer Patients

Study Investigates Online Information Available to Lung Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers from The University of Manchester have begun a study to look at the online information available to lung cancer patients in an era of diagnosis by google.


"Lung cancer affects around 41,000 people in the UK each year and has one of the lowest survival rates of any cancer, which experts think is partly because people do not get treatment early enough or recognise the symptoms.


"The Medical Research Council-funded study will include a systematic review of the information about lung cancer currently available online to see how this can be improved."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 19, 2014

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General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results from the DELTA trial indicate no significant differences in progression-free (PF) or overall survival (OS) after treatment with docetaxel versus erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients unselected for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status.


"By contrast, in the subgroup of patients whose tumours were positive for EGFR mutations, PFS and OS were nonsignificantly longer in the erlotinib than the docetaxel group, whereas in those with wild-type tumours, docetaxel was significantly superior to erlotinib in terms of PFS, observe the researchers in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Editor's note: This story discusses the results of a clinical trial comparing the targeted drug erlotinib (aka Tarceva) with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel in volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the trial, patients whose tumors had mutations in the EGFR gene benefitted more from erlotinib than docetaxel, while patients without EGFR mutations (as detected by molecular testing) had better results from docetaxel.

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medwireNews  |  Jun 13, 2014

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ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival

ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab modestly improved survival in squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a pivotal trial, but many called the effect too small to count.


"Adding the drug to a standard chemotherapy regimen improved overall survival by 16% (P=0.012), Nick Thatcher, MD, of Christie Hospital in Manchester, England, and colleagues found in the SQUIRE trial.


"While only about a 6-week gain over chemotherapy alone (median 11.5 versus 9.9 months), Thatcher called the findings an important advance."


Editor's note: Necitumumab is a drug that may hold promise for some patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial to test the drug on volunteer patients, researchers found that necitumumab can increase survival by 6 weeks, compared to standard chemotherapy treatment. Some researchers say a 6 week increase in survival time is not terribly meaningful, and may be setting the bar too low for treatment of squamous NSCLC.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

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ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.


"Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found."


Editor's note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients

No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In a Japanese phase III trial (DELTA) reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Kawaguchi et al found that erlotinib (Tarceva) was associated with no progression-free survival or overall survival advantage as second- or third-line therapy in EGFR-unselected patients with non–small cell lung cancer.


"In this open-label trial, 301 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, previous treatment with one or two chemotherapy regimens, evaluable or measurable disease, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned between August 2009 and July 2012 to erlotinib at 150 mg daily (n = 150) or docetaxel at 60 mg/m2every 3 weeks (n = 151). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In total, 109 patients (73%) in the erlotinib group and 90 (60%) in the docetaxel group had EGFR wild-type disease. Study treatment was third line in 19% and 14%, respectively."


Editor's note: This clinical trial tested a drug called erlotinib (brand name Tarceva), which is already known to be an effective treatment for lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, in this trial, the scientists were interested in whether erlotinib might help all patients, regardless of whether EGFR is mutated. The results show that erlotinib is no more effective than chemo for patients without EGFR mutations. But we recently posted another story about a protein test that may predict whether a patient without EGFR mutations might benefit from erlotinib treatment: http://www.cancercommons.org/news/proteomic-signature-for-egfr-inhibitor-therapy-predicts-survival-benefit-of-second-line-chemotherapy-vs-erlotinib-in-nsclc/.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 27, 2014

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Necitumumab Plus Chemotherapy Shows Overall Survival Benefit in Patients With Squamous NSCLC

Necitumumab Plus Chemotherapy Shows Overall Survival Benefit in Patients With Squamous NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A large phase III study investigating necitumumab (IMC-11F8) in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin as first-line treatment for advanced squamous non–small cell lung cancer show a statistically significant improvement in overall survival of patients with stage IV disease.


"Patients receiving necitumumab plus chemotherapy had a median survival of 11.5 months compared to 9.9 months for patients treated with chemotherapy alone.


"Progression-free survival and disease control rate were also significantly improved."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial that is testing the effectiveness of a new treatment for lung cancer patients. So far, the trial has found that the treatment is promising for people with stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To learn more about clinical trials, and the risks and advantages for patients who participate in them, click here.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 16, 2014

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Postop Opioid Use Tied to NSCLC Recurrence

Postop Opioid Use Tied to NSCLC Recurrence | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who experienced disease recurrence half a decade after surgery received a significantly higher dose of opioids postoperatively, researchers said here.


"In a retrospective study among patients treated for early-stage NSCLC, recurrence occurred in 26 who received a mean dose of 232 mg of opioids in the 96 hours after surgery compared with 124 mg of opioids administered to the 73 patients in whom there was no recurrence in 5 years (P=0.020), reported Dermot Maher, MD,from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and colleagues."

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MedPage Today  |  May 4, 2014

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Poor Quality of Life Does Not Predict Low Survival Rates in High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgery

Poor Quality of Life Does Not Predict Low Survival Rates in High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgery | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Quality of life is rarely reported in surgical publications, yet it can be an important metric that can be of use to physicians and patients when making treatment decisions. Prior studies of average-risk patients undergoing lobectomy suggested that low baseline quality-of-life scores predict worse survival in patients undergoing non–small cell lung cancer surgery.


"However, the results of a multicenter, longitudinal study of high-risk lung cancer patients who underwent sublobar resection counters this idea, finding that poor baseline global quality-of-life scores did not predict for worse overall survival or recurrence-free survival or greater risk of adverse events. Bryan F. Meyers, MD, presented the results of this research today on behalf of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology at the 94th American Association for Thoracic Surgery Annual Meeting in Toronto, Ontario."

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The ASCO Post  |  Apr 29, 2014

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Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening

Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"It is important to recognize and treat anxiety or depression among cancer patients, according to a clinical guideline published online April 14 in theJournal of Clinical Oncology...


"The panel recommends that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety periodically throughout care. Validated, published measures and procedures should be used for assessments. Different treatment pathways are recommended depending on symptom level. The risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality is increased by the failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 22, 2014

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New General Concept for the Treatment of Cancer

New General Concept for the Treatment of Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A team of researchers from five Swedish universities, led by Karolinska Institutet and the Science for Life Laboratory, have identified a new way of treating cancer. The concept is presented in the journal Nature and is based on inhibiting a specific enzyme called MTH1, which cancer cells, unlike normal cells, require for survival. Without this enzyme, oxidized nucleotides are incorporated into DNA, resulting in lethal DNA double-strand breaks in cancer cells."


Editor's note: As stated in the article, it will be a couple of years before this treatment becomes available to patients in clinical trials. Other "targeted therapies" are already being used to treat cancer.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 2, 2014

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ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients

ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cabazitaxel failed to meet a primary endpoint of showing superior progression-free survival (PFS) and additionally showed less favourable median overall survival (OS) compared to topotecan in an international, randomised open-label phase II trial performed in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), who had progressed during or after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The results were presented by Dr Tracey Evans of the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA in a proffered papers session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."


Editor's note: This trial found disappointing results for the drug cabazitaxel in treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC). To read about promising SCLC treatments, see this blog feature.

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ESMO  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC

Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Poor baseline quality-of-life scores did not predict worse survival outcomes among patients undergoing non–small cell lung cancer surgery who were at high risk for adverse events.


"In a randomized, multicenter trial, Hiran C. Fernando, MD, chief of the division of thoracic surgery at Boston Medical Center, evaluated 212 patients with NSCLC who were randomly assigned to undergo sublobar resection or sublobar resection with brachytherapy."


Editor's note: This story describes a study that tracked the quality of life of volunteers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were undergoing surgery to remove their tumors and who were at high risk for harmful side effects of the surgery. The study aimed to determine if low quality of life before surgery was linked with worse outcomes of the surgery. Contrary to previous studies, this study found that poor quality of life did not predict poor surgical outcomes.

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Healio  |  Jun 24, 2014

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General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The presence of a six-gene profile in the microRNA of patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts reduced survival likelihood after first-line treatment with targeted therapy followed by chemotherapy for disease progression, indicate research results.


"While the findings 'should be further validated', the researchers believe their analysis 'supports the hypothesis that circulating [microRNA's] may further be developed as predictive markers for EGFR-targeted treatment' in an NSCLC population whose response to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors is unknown."


Editor's note: This story describes a new, blood test-based method by which oncologists may be able to predict the effects of targeted therapy treatment on the survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it may be able to predict the effects of first-line treatment with drugs known as EGFR inhibitors, which are prescribed to people whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In a study with volunteer patients, scientists took blood samples just before and just after the patients began taking the drugs bevacizumab or erlotinib. The scientists identified six different kinds of a molecule called microRNA that, if present, were associated with a lower chance of survival (29 months versus more than 45 months). More testing will be needed to determine if this six-gene signature can be used widely; it would be a non-invasive alternative to making predictions and monitoring treatment effectiveness using repeat tumor biopsies.

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medwireNews  |  June 20, 2014

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Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates? | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.


"Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ."

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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Living With Cancer: Chronic, Not Cured

Living With Cancer: Chronic, Not Cured | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"At the end of yoga sessions for cancer patients, we are told to say to ourselves, 'I am whole, healed and healthy in this and every moment.' Perversely, since in yoga we express aspirations as if they were already so, the sentence reminds me of people who congratulate me on being 'cancer free.' Stable disease often goes unrecognized.


"Perhaps the concept of chronic cancer has been hard to comprehend because public discussion tends to focus on the initial diagnosis of breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer yields good survival rates and many patients can consider themselves cured. Often we assume a clear-cut partition between survivors and the terminally ill."


Editor's note: This article addresses the under-recognition of chronic cancer that is neither cured nor quickly progressing, and how patients cope with finding themselves in this "gray area."

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The New York Times  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 6, 2014 12:27 PM

Finally!  Credit to the advocates for finally creating recognition for a segment of the cancer survivor population that has long been kept out of conversations - and, yes, even some support groups.  Education is the first step.  Chronic and metastatic disease can be a confronting conversation but to ignore the unique challenges, concerns and needs of any part of the population dealing with the impact of cancer is not acceptable.  Wonderful to see a mainstream media source bringing this issue to the forefront.  Education leads to less fear, less judgment, less ignorance and greater compassion, connection and support.

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, June 7, 2014 12:41 PM

This article raises an important facet of some cancers -- that of a chronic condition rather than either a "cure" or an actively progressing disease. How others view this "gray area" vs. how cancer patients view it can make a difference in how supported the individual feels. Nonetheless, my view is that the cancer patient's perspective, attitudes and beliefs trump what goes on externally, and that we can choose happiness regardless of what is going on around us.

Teresa Levitch's curator insight, July 4, 2014 9:00 AM

Given the long term effects of cancer treatment, such as Radiation Fibrosis, Chemo Brain, and Secondary Cancers ,after we are declared in remission we live in a gray area..

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Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC

Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Thoracic radiotherapy along with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival in patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer, according to results of a new study presented at ASCO.


"Ben Slotman, MD, PhD, of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, presented the study and said that previous work had shown that PCI could improve both symptomatic brain metastases and overall survival at 1 year. 'In that study, we also noticed that the vast majority of patients after chemotherapy had intrathoracic disease' and intrathoracic progression, he said, which was the impetus for the new study using thoracic radiotherapy."


Editor's note: To learn more about new prospects for treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC), see our two-part blog feature on the topic.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 5, 2014

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New Strategies to Improve Quality of Life for Cancer Patients, Caregivers

New Strategies to Improve Quality of Life for Cancer Patients, Caregivers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"New strategies for easing the short- and long-term effects of cancer therapy and improving the quality of life of patients with cancer, as well as their caregivers have been released by researchers. "We've made incredible strides in cancer treatment, and more cancer survivors are alive today than ever before. But oncology isn't just about helping people live longer -- we need to ensure that patients have the best quality of life possible at every stage of their cancer journey," said one expert."

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ScienceDaily  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC

Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"There are conflicting data on whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy is beneficial in second-line treatment of lung cancer patients with unknown or wild-type EGFR status. In a phase III trial (PROSE) reported in The Lancet Oncology, Gregorc et al assessed the predictive value of a proteomic signature serum protein test for likely outcome of EGFR inhibitor therapy in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving second-line therapy with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (Tarceva) vs chemotherapy. They found that the test was predictive of differential survival benefit for erlotinib vs chemotherapy, with patients classified by the test as likely to have poor outcome on EGFR inhibitor therapy having better outcome on chemotherapy."

"Overall survival was significantly better with chemotherapy among patients with a proteomic classification of poor, whereas there was no difference between chemotherapy and erlotinib in patients with a classification of good."

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The ASCO Post  |  May 22, 2014

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Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know

Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"At first glance, the connection between a cancer diagnosis and depression might seem to be an obvious one. However, in patients battling this life-threatening disease, depression can have a serious impact, and even worsen the odds of survival. While the best approach to interrupting this vicious cycle is not fully understood, clinicians can help patients improve their odds by availing them of therapeutic resources and open communication."

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Healio  |  May 13, 2014

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:29 PM

So few survivors are being screened for anxiety and depression - which impact quality of life.  It's important for survivors and caregivers to be aware of these ten things and communicate with healthcare providers when necessary.

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Major Lung Resection Safer than Ever, Especially at the Busiest Hospitals

Major Lung Resection Safer than Ever, Especially at the Busiest Hospitals | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Major lung surgery has become progressively safer over the last few decades, although higher death rates at low-volume hospitals and an unexpected increase in mortality at 90 days compared to 30 days were observed. The study further suggests that choosing a center that performs major lung surgery regularly can have a strong impact on survival."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 29, 2014

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Half of All Cancer Patients Now Survive at Least 10 Years

Half of All Cancer Patients Now Survive at Least 10 Years | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Fifty per cent of people diagnosed with cancer today will survive their disease for at least 10 years, according to landmark figures published by Cancer Research UK today.


"In the early 1970s just a quarter of people diagnosed with cancer survived 10 years.


"Today, Cancer Research UK sets out an ambitious new strategy to accelerate progress with the ambition that three-quarters (75 per cent) of all cancer patients diagnosed in 20 years time will survive at least 10 years."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 29, 2014

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Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Among patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer without a mutation of a certain gene, conventional chemotherapy, compared with treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, was associated with improvement in survival without progression of the cancer, but not with overall survival, according to a study."


Editor's note: The drugs discussed in this story, "epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors," are targeted therapies that are used to treat lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Scientists wanted to find out whether the drugs could also help patients without EGFR mutations. However, it was found that the drugs were no more effective than chemotherapy in improving patients' overall survival. This supports the idea that EGFR inhibitor drugs should only be given to patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations.

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 8, 2014

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Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period

Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Race-based differences in cancer survival have not changed over time, and the disparities among black patients persist independent of treatment and disease stage, study results showed.


"Ayal A. Aizer, MD, MHS, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues used the SEER database to identify 2.7 million patients diagnosed with lung, breast, prostate or colorectal cancers between 1988 and 2007. The final analysis included more than 1 million patients."

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