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Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer

Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers have taken the next step in confirming the identity of previously unknown gene mutation that drives lung cancer development. Scientists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) originally identified the mutation in one patient out of nine with advanced lung cancer who responded well to the drug sorafenib. The clinical trial involved 306 participants total.


"Within two months of beginning treatment, the patient had demonstrated a near complete response, and she remained progression-free and asymptomatic for five years while continuing to take sorafenib by mouth."


Editor's note: Different patients' tumors have different genetic mutations. More and more, doctors are using patients' tumor genetics to match patients with treatments that are most likely to work for them. Now, researchers have discovered a mutation called S214C, which may help doctors predict some lung cancer patients' responses to treatment. The mutation was found in a patient in a clinical trial who responded particularly well to a drug called sorafenib.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

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'Super Responders' May Hold Clues for Cancer Treatment

'Super Responders' May Hold Clues for Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In rare, previously unexplained cases, individual cancer patients respond to treatment much better than others do. Now, faster and cheaper DNA sequencing is allowing researchers to search the entire genetic material of such patients for the causes of their 'super responder' status. In one case, researchers linked one patient's exceptional response to Afinitor (everolimus) to a mutation in the TSC1 gene. They plan to develop a test for this mutation, hoping to identify other cancer patients who will respond strongly to Afinitor. Such studies may resurrect drug candidates that were abandoned after clinical trials, where they were ineffective in most, but very effective in a few patients. Clinical trials and clinics focusing specifically on super responders are being planned.

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Reuters | Sep 15, 2013

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Study of ‘Super Responder’ Reveals Possible New Gene Target for Lung Cancer

Study of ‘Super Responder’ Reveals Possible New Gene Target for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A potential new gene mutation that might drive lung cancer development and growth has been identified by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James).


"A multi-institutional team led by OSUCCC-James researchers reports the findings in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study describes a patient with advanced lung cancer who was treated with the targeted drug sorafenib while on a clinical trial. Within two months, she demonstrated a near complete response, and she remained progression-free and asymptomic for five years while continuing to take sorafenib by mouth."

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The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center  |  Feb 24, 2014

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