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Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer

Study of 'Super Responder' Reveals New Oncogene for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers have taken the next step in confirming the identity of previously unknown gene mutation that drives lung cancer development. Scientists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) originally identified the mutation in one patient out of nine with advanced lung cancer who responded well to the drug sorafenib. The clinical trial involved 306 participants total.


"Within two months of beginning treatment, the patient had demonstrated a near complete response, and she remained progression-free and asymptomatic for five years while continuing to take sorafenib by mouth."


Editor's note: Different patients' tumors have different genetic mutations. More and more, doctors are using patients' tumor genetics to match patients with treatments that are most likely to work for them. Now, researchers have discovered a mutation called S214C, which may help doctors predict some lung cancer patients' responses to treatment. The mutation was found in a patient in a clinical trial who responded particularly well to a drug called sorafenib.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

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RET Mutations May Emerge as New Target for Lung Cancer Treatments

RET Mutations May Emerge as New Target for Lung Cancer Treatments | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A certain type of mutation in a protein, called RET, occurs in a significant subset of lung cancer patients, a recent study shows. Known as 'rearrangements,' these mutations fuse the RET gene with other nearby genes, resulting in a RET protein that contains parts of other proteins and is hyperactive. Patients with similar rearrangement mutations in another gene, ALK, can experience drastic improvements from treatment with ALK inhibitors such as crizotinib (Xalkori). This raises the hope that patients with RET rearrangement mutations may be similarly helped by drugs that block RET–either novel RET inhibitors or existing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as vandetanib (Caprelsa), sunitinib (Sutent), sorafenib (Nexavar), or ponatinib (Iclusig). Identifying patients who may benefit from such treatments would be made easier by the new test for RET mutations developed by the study’s authors. When examining a group of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who did not have mutations in other cancer-relevant genes, the researchers found that 15% had RET rearrangement mutations.

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Medical Xpress | June 3, 2013

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Study of ‘Super Responder’ Reveals Possible New Gene Target for Lung Cancer

Study of ‘Super Responder’ Reveals Possible New Gene Target for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A potential new gene mutation that might drive lung cancer development and growth has been identified by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James).


"A multi-institutional team led by OSUCCC-James researchers reports the findings in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study describes a patient with advanced lung cancer who was treated with the targeted drug sorafenib while on a clinical trial. Within two months, she demonstrated a near complete response, and she remained progression-free and asymptomic for five years while continuing to take sorafenib by mouth."

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The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center  |  Feb 24, 2014

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Tarceva May Be More Effective in Advanced NSCLC When Combined with Other Targeted Therapies

Tarceva May Be More Effective in Advanced NSCLC When Combined with Other Targeted Therapies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

An analysis of multiple clinical trials compared erlotinib (Tarceva) alone to combining Tarceva with other targeted therapies as second-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the various trials, Tarceva was combined with bevacizumab (Avastin), bortezomib (Velcade), everolimus (Afinitor), sorafenib (Nexavar), sunitinib (Sutent), entinostat, tivantinib, and R1507. While combined therapy produced more side effects, it was more effective than Tarceva alone. Notably, the trials included many patients who had not been tested for mutations in the EGFR and KRAS genes. In patients who had EGFR mutations and/or lacked KRAS mutations, Tarceva alone tended to control cancer progression better than combined therapy, highlighting the importance of biomarker testing to identify which patients are most likely to benefit from different therapies.

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PLoS ONE | Feb 8, 2013

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