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'Cold Caps' May Save Cancer Patients' Hair During Chemotherapy

'Cold Caps' May Save Cancer Patients' Hair During Chemotherapy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

To minimize hair loss during chemotherapy, some patients chill their scalps using specialized caps. The low temperatures are supposed to decrease blood flow in the scalp, preventing chemotherapy drugs from reaching the hair roots and damaging them. However, it is still unclear how well these 'cold caps' work and whether they are safe, and so far they have not been approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. Theoretically, shielding some areas of the body from chemotherapy might allow some cancer cells to survive the treatment, although the scalp is an uncommon site for cancer recurrence. An upcoming study at several U.S. hospitals will investigate the effectiveness and safety of cold caps to prevent chemotherapy hair loss.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Associated Press | Jul 22, 2013

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Associated Press | Jul 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:24 PM

Associated Press | Jul 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:24 PM

Associated Press | Jul 22, 2013

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Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer

Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer and its treatment can diminish quality of life, but two recent reviews of past clinical trials show that exercise can help restore a sense of well-being in both cancer patients and survivors. Measures of quality of life included fatigue, anxiety, and pain, while types of exercise included walking, bicycling, and yoga. The first review looked at 56 trials with a total of 4,826 people who were undergoing cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that exercise reduced anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbances and that the more intense the exercise, the greater the benefits. The second review examined 40 trials with a total of 3,500 people who had completed cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that people who exercised were less worried and felt less fatigue and pain. They also had better self images, which is key to avoiding the social isolation that can come with changes in appearance due to cancer treatments.

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans

Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Most people who survive cancer are left to deal with the physical and emotional aftermath of treatment on their own—but they still need help. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments range from heart damage and painful nerve death to depression and body image disorders. However, a recent survey found that only 17% of people who survived cancer were given a long-term care plan. Cancer survivors can seek help at seven U.S. centers that focus on care after cancer, as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. The U.S. has nearly 14 million cancer survivors today, with 18 million expected by 2022.

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Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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Looking Good Helps People with Cancer Feel Better, Too

Cancer treatments can extend and even save lives, but the cosmetic side effects can devastate a person's sense of self. These changes in appearance—from dry, itchy skin to loss of hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes to disfiguring surgery—can also lead to social isolation. Understandably, changes to the face are particularly distressing. Ways of coping with altered looks include makeup and wigs as well as physical activity and therapy. Women with cancer can get free beauty tips from makeup artists and wig stylists through the Look Good…Feel Better program, which is offered at more than 3,000 hospitals and community centers across the country.



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National Cancer Institute│Mar 27, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 2013 6:21 PM

National Cancer Institute │ Mar 27, 2013

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National Cancer Institute│Mar 27, 2013