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Breathalyzer Test May Detect Deadliest Cancer

Breathalyzer Test May Detect Deadliest Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Lung cancer causes more deaths in the US than the next three most common cancers combined. Now a new breathalyzer test, embedded with a 'NaNose' nanotech chip to literally 'sniff out' cancer tumors, has been developed by a team of international researchers. It may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression."

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ScienceDaily  |  Jun 18, 2014

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No Long-Term Anxiety or Distress Associated with Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening

No Long-Term Anxiety or Distress Associated with Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Examination and review of several studies that evaluated patient-centered outcomes for individuals undergoing low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer found that screening does not appear to significantly influence overall health-related quality of life or result in long-term changes in anxiety or distress, but that positive results in the short-term, do increase distress levels."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 16, 2014

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Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don't always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.


"The study examined data from more than 1100 people aged 50 and older who made decisions about whether to undergo screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or prostate cancer in the previous 2 years. Participants were asked whether their physicians discussed the pros and cons of screening and of forgoing screening, and if they had been given a choice whether or not to be screened."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 13, 2014

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Lung Cancer Screening Abnormalities Prompted Smoking Cessation

Lung Cancer Screening Abnormalities Prompted Smoking Cessation | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Smokers who received abnormal or suspicious lung cancer screening results were less likely to still smoke at the time of the next year’s screen, according to study results.


"Martin C. Tammemägi, PhD, of the department of health sciences at Brock University in Ontario, Canada, and colleagues reviewed National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) data on 14,692 adults who were current smokers at baseline and did not develop lung cancer during follow-up. The median age of patients was 60.6 years; a majority were men (58.7%) and non-Hispanic white (89.5%)."

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Healio  |  May 28, 2014

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The Ups and Downs of Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

The Ups and Downs of Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"As a form of cancer that kills 90% of those who develop it, lung cancer is a particularly fearsome adversary to the field of oncology. However, because half of patients with lung cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis, early detection offers hope for reduced mortality.


"To this end, several organizations — including the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American Lung Association (ALA) and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) — have updated their lung cancer screening guidelines to suggest screenings with low-dose CT."

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Healio  |  May 21, 2014

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CMS Advisory Panel Rejects Medicare Coverage for Lung Cancer Screening

CMS Advisory Panel Rejects Medicare Coverage for Lung Cancer Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A CMS panel today rejected the concept of national Medicare coverage of annual lung cancer screening for high-risk individuals.


"The Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) conducted a daylong hearing during which several clinicians and members of the public testified about the benefits and risks of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT."

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Healio  |  Apr 30, 2014

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Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis.


"Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called 'liquid biopsies.'


"Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces — either intact cancer cells or fragments of tumor DNA — are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them."

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis

DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators.


"Analyzing blood samples from 640 patients with various cancers, the researchers used digital polymerase chain reaction-based technology (a sophisticated method of multiplying and measuring the number DNA molecules) to evaluate how well the DNA fragments predicted the presence of tumors in the patients."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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MSC Lung Cancer Test Offers Fewer False Positives, Early Detection

MSC Lung Cancer Test Offers Fewer False Positives, Early Detection | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans are the currently recommended screening method for lung cancer in heavy smokers. However, these scans produce many false positives (identifying suspicious lung nodules when no cancer is actually present), needlessly exposing numerous people to the costs and risks of invasive follow-up procedures. Now, a large study has shown that a simple blood test may complement CT scans to reduce the false positive rate in lung cancer screening. The microRNA signature classifier (MSC) Lung Cancer assay measures the expression levels of several molecules called microRNAs to classify patients as low, intermediate, and high risk. In a trial of over 4,000 current or former smokers, the MSC Lung Cancer assay detected the vast majority of all lung cancers accurately, but produced a low rate of false positives. Moreover, the test detected some cancers up to 2 years before the CT scans.

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Medical News Today  |  Jan 15, 2014

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Inflammation Markers Offer Clue About Lung Cancer Risk

Inflammation Markers Offer Clue About Lung Cancer Risk | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Increased inflammation may be a warning of elevated lung cancer risk. A recent study analyzed blood samples taken from over 1,000 patients getting screened for lung cancer. Half of the patients went on to develop lung cancer in the following years. Eleven chemical markers of inflammation in the patients’ blood were associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The researchers developed an inflammation score based on the levels of four of these inflammation markers. Patients with the highest inflammation score were 2.8 times more likely to develop lung cancer than those with the lowest score (3.4 times more likely if the patients were current smokers). This inflammation score may therefore serve to identify high-risk patients in the future.

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ASCO Post  |  Dec 9, 2013

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Having That Persistent Cough Checked Out Early Can Save Lives

Having That Persistent Cough Checked Out Early Can Save Lives | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A public health campaign, encouraging people throughout England to go to the doctor early if they have symptoms that could indicate lung cancer, has yielded strong results. The Be Clear On Cancer campaign urged people with a cough lasting more than 3 weeks to see a doctor. In the months during which the campaign ran, 700 more people were diagnosed with lung cancer than in the same months of the previous year–an increase of 10%. Four hundred more people than usual were diagnosed in the early stages of lung cancer, when the disease is most treatable, and 300 more received lung cancer surgery. While most cases of a persistent cough are not due to lung cancer, campaign organizers stress that it is better to be safe.

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Medical Xpress  |  Dec 9, 2013

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Scan Donation Program Allows Patients to Contribute to Lung Cancer Research

People across the U.S. who undergo computed tomography (CT) lung scans to screen for lung cancer or monitor their existing cancer can now donate their scans to lung cancer research. The Give A Scan program strips the images of personal identifiers and adds them to a publicly available website, where they can be accessed by researchers worldwide at no charge. To provide additional data for investigators, patients can give (anonymized) information about their family cancer history, smoking history, exposure to other cancer-causing agents, and treatment regimens along with their scans, if they feel comfortable doing so. This material will help researchers better understand lung cancer and aid their efforts to develop more effective treatments and diagnostics.

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Yahoo! News  |  Dec 3, 2013

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New Technique Makes Testing Lung Fluid for Cancer Easier and More Accurate

New Technique Makes Testing Lung Fluid for Cancer Easier and More Accurate | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new technique examines the physical properties of cells from lung fluid to see whether they are likely to be cancerous. Pleural fluid, which lubricates lungs, can build up excessively (a condition called 'pleural effusion') in a number of lung diseases, including cancer. Examining cells from pleural effusions for cancer is traditionally done by visual inspection, which requires difficult, time-consuming dyeing or labeling of cells and is not always reliable. The new technique uses a rapid automated process that squeezes cells to assess their consistency. Cancer cells are more 'squishable' than healthy cells, which allows them to infiltrate tissues and spread. The new technique can analyze 1,000 cells per second and is more sensitive than the traditional approach.

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013

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More than 130 Lawmakers Urge Coverage for Lung Cancer Test that Could Cost Medicare Billions

More than 130 Lawmakers Urge Coverage for Lung Cancer Test that Could Cost Medicare Billions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"More than 130 lawmakers are urging the Obama administration to expand coverage for a lung-cancer test under Medicare that could cost the program billons, calling the screening important for vulnerable seniors.

"In a letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the lawmakers called for a timely decision on coverage for low-dose CT scans for older patients at higher risk of developing lung cancer."

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StarTribune  |  Jun 17, 2014

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Improved Diagnostic Performance of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening

Improved Diagnostic Performance of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Screening | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Investigators of the COSMOS (Continuous Observation of SMOking Subjects) study show good compliance and patient survival outcomes using a 5-year low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening protocol in individuals at high-risk of developing lung cancer. This protocol had fewer patients requiring further diagnostic follow-up compared to other studies, including the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST), with a minimal number of incorrect diagnoses."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 16, 2014

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One Step Closer to a Breath Test for Lung Cancer

One Step Closer to a Breath Test for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A test of organic compounds in exhaled breath can not only distinguish patients with lung cancer from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also define the stage of any cancer present, new research shows. The device requires blowing up a balloon, which is then attached to an extremely sensitive gold nanoparticle sensor. The particles in the sensor trap and then help to analyze volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath."

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ScienceDaily  |  May 31, 2014

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Bronchial Gene Test Rules Out Lung Cancer

Bronchial Gene Test Rules Out Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Gene analysis of the bronchial airway could reduce unnecessary invasive testing for suspected cases of lung cancer, a study suggested.


"A 17-gene test for normal epithelial cells gathered on bronchoscopy boosted the ability of that procedure to rule out cancer, Duncan Whitney, PhD, of test developer Allegro Diagnostics in Maynard, Mass., and colleagues found."

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MedPage Today  |  May 20, 2014

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Lung Cancer Screening Would Cost Medicare Billions

Lung Cancer Screening Would Cost Medicare Billions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Implementation of a national lung cancer screening program using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) will identify almost 55,000 additional lung cancer cases over 5 years, but will add more than $9 billion to Medicare expenditures, according to results of a new study.


"Joshua A. Roth, PhD, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, discussed the economic analysis during a press conference in advance of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, where results will be formally presented at the end of the month. He noted that following the positive results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended LDCT screening in healthy persons between the ages of 55 and 80 with at least 30 pack-years of smoking history. Medicare, meanwhile, is expected to release a draft decision on screening coverage in November of this year. 'That decision will likely heavily weight the Task Force’s recommendation,' Roth said."

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Cancer Network  |  May 15, 2014

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Management of Elderly Patients with Lung Cancer

"An expert opinion on managing treatment for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer has been recently published. This update includes recommendations for screening, surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, treatment of locally advanced and metastatic disease as well as new data on patient preferences and geriatric assessment."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 22, 2014

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ELCC 2014 News: Clinical Utility of miRNA Signature in Plasma of Smokers Included in LD-CT Lung Cancer Screening

"Recent results indicate that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) screening reduces lung cancer mortality in high risk subjects. However, high false positive rates, costs and potential harm highlight the need for complementary biomarkers. Led by Dr Ugo Pastorino, a group of researchers from Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy, retrospectively evaluated a non-invasive plasma miRNA signature classifier in prospectively collected samples from smokers within the randomised Multicentre Italian Lung Detection (MILD) trial. Their findings indicate that microRNA signature classifier has predictive, diagnostic and prognostic value and its combined use with LD-CT may improve screening performance. The results were presented in a proffered papers session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."


Editor's note: LD-CT is a lung cancer detection method that has been shown to reduce risk of death from lung cancer for high-risk patients. However, it sometimes leads to "false-positives," in which suspected cancer later turns out not to be cancer. A new, non-invasive blood test to look for specific kinds of miRNA molecules was shown to be promising as a potential companion test to complement LD-CT screening.

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ESMO  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates

Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Medical imaging techniques that use high doses of radiation, including computed tomography (CT) scans, play an important role in modern medicine, including cancer screening. However, these procedures may themselves increase the incidence of cancer. Radiation exposure from medical imaging in the U.S. has increased more than sixfold between the 1980s and 2006. Several studies have linked multiple CT scans to increased cancer risk. Moreover, there are no official guidelines on the correct radiation doses for different medical imaging techniques, meaning that doses at one hospital may be up to 50 times higher than at another. Clear standards are needed to ensure that high-radiation imaging techniques are only used when clearly medically necessary and that the lowest feasible radiation doses are employed.

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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Annual Lung Cancer Screening Recommended for High-Risk Individuals

Annual Lung Cancer Screening Recommended for High-Risk Individuals | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has published its final recommendations on lung cancer screening. The panel advises annual computed tomography (CT) scans for high-risk individuals (heavy smokers or former heavy smokers who have quit within the past 15 years) between 55 and 80 years of age. The recommendation is based on the results of a comprehensive review of the existing evidence and on modeling studies predicting the benefits and harms of different screening programs. Some experts have criticized the use of modeling data in developing the guidelines. Others consider practical concerns in implementing the recommendation, such as how to actually select those patients eligible and refer them to screening.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jan 2, 2014

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CT Scans May Overdiagnose Lung Cancer

CT Scans May Overdiagnose Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scans have emerged as an effective screening tool for lung cancer, especially in high-risk patients. However, the method may have a significant rate of overdiagnosis, that is, detection of cancers that would not have caused any symptoms during the patient’s lifetime. These cancers may be slow growing or otherwise clinically insignificant. Overdiagnosis can lead to unnecessary treatment, generating significant cost and anxiety and risking medical complications. A large study comparing LDCT screening with another screening method, chest radiography, estimated that 18.5% of the lung cancer cases detected represented overdiagnoses. For cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and bronchioalveolar carcinoma (cancer of the air sacs), estimated overdiagnosis rates were 22.5% and 78.9%, respectively.

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Medical News Today  |  Dec 9, 2013

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Lung Cancer Scans Can Also Warn of Heart Disease Risk

Lung Cancer Scans Can Also Warn of Heart Disease Risk | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Computed tomography (CT) scans are used to screen for possible lung cancer, but they can also be used to assess patients’ risk of heart disease, recent evidence shows. Doctors can use images of a patient’s chest region to look for calcium deposits in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Heavier deposits are associated with greater heart disease risk. A study of over 1,500 people who had undergone lung cancer screening found that a simple visual inspection of their CT scan images for calcium deposits was as successful in identifying their relative heart disease risk as the current 'gold standard' heart disease risk analysis. These findings are particularly relevant because people at high risk of lung cancer (ie, older people with a history of heavy smoking) are also more likely to have heart disease.

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MedPage Today  |  Dec 4, 2013

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Advances in Screening and Surgery Improve Lung Cancer Survival

Advances in Screening and Surgery Improve Lung Cancer Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

New U.S. guidelines recommending low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans to screen for lung cancer in high-risk individuals are leading to earlier detection and better survival for lung cancer patients. Screening is available without a prescription for people who have smoked the equivalent of at least a pack of cigarettes per day for 30 years. The scans can uncover lung cancer in early stages, when the chances for successful treatment are the highest. Recent medical advances have also made lung cancer surgery less invasive. Robotic surgeries can often be performed through small incisions in the chest, without the need to crack open ribs. These developments mean more lung cancer patients can undergo surgery and those who do have an easier recovery.

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Tampa Bay Times  |  Nov 29, 2013

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