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Radiation Therapy Can Treat Suspected Lung Cancer Without Biopsy

Radiation Therapy Can Treat Suspected Lung Cancer Without Biopsy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Some patients with suspected lung cancer cannot undergo a biopsy due to other illnesses or overall frailty; for others, biopsies are performed, but with inconclusive results. For these patients, the diagnosis of lung cancer often rests on strong evidence from computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scans. In many of these cases, lung cancer also cannot be treated with surgery. A recent study confirms radiation therapy as a safe and effective method for controlling lung cancer in such patients. Thirty-four patients with unbiopsied lung cancer received stereotaxic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Tumors stopped growing in all patients but 1, shrank in 7 patients, and disappeared entirely in 8 of them. No severe side effects were observed. Another study demonstrated that SBRT, in which focused, high doses of radiation are given over a relatively small number of sessions, is more effective against inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than traditional, conventionally fractioned radiotherapy (CFR).

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MedPage Today  |  Dec 2, 2013

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New Clinical Trial Will Study Novel Lung Cancer Drug Vantictumab

New Clinical Trial Will Study Novel Lung Cancer Drug Vantictumab | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new clinical trial will investigate the safety of vantictumab (OMP-18R5), a new lung cancer drug targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs, the actively multiplying cells responsible for generating tumors, are thought to be central in cancer relapse by 'repopulating' tumors, even if the bulk of the tumors cells are destroyed during treatment. Vantictumab blocks the Wnt pathway, a key molecular signaling pathway used by CSCs. Patients with previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive vantictumab in combination with the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere). In addition to the safety of the drug combination, the trial will also investigate how effective it is and whether any biomarkers predict how well patients respond.

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MarketWatch  |  Nov 15, 2013

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Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies

Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors have been the primary treatment methods for many types of cancer for many years, but new studies may change that. Peptides, proteins made of small chains of 10 to 50 amino acids, are being examined as possible cost-effective, more successful, safer anticancer vaccines. Researchers have identified two regions on the HER1 (also known as the EGFR) protein as possible targets for these peptide-based drugs. These agents could be used in the treatment of lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancers. If successful, the EGFR-targeting peptide vaccines could be combined with immunotherapies for the HER2 and VEGF proteins, possibly reducing the likelihood that the cancer will develop resistance to the treatment, a common pitfall of monoclonal antibody drugs such as cetuximab (Erbitux).

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Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 26, 2013 4:50 PM

Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013

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Four-Drug Combination Shown to Be Safe and Effective for NSCLC

Four-Drug Combination Shown to Be Safe and Effective for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A combination of the drugs carboplatin (Paraplatin), paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane), cetuximab (Erbitux), and bevacizumab (Avastin) has demonstrated effectiveness against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase II clinical trial. One hundred two patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received the four-drug combo as a first-line treatment. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Patients went an average of 7 months without their cancer progressing; the average survival time was 15 months. Four treatment-related deaths occurred, including two due to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding), which can be a rare but serious effect of Avastin treatment. This side effect profile was within the predefined safety margin. A phase III trial further investigating this drug combination for NSCLC is currently enrolling participants.

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MedwireNews  |  Dec 2, 2013

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Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective

Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Combining cetuximab (Erbitux), bevacizumab (Avastin), and traditional chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appeared to be safe and effective in a phase II clinical trial. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received Erbitux and Avastin in addition to carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane) as first-line treatment, followed by maintenance treatment with Erbitux and Avastin. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Serious side effects were relatively rare; the rate was comparable to that of either Erbitux or Avastin alone. Both Erbitux and Avastin have shown efficacy in NSCLC by themselves, but may be more effective when given together. An ongoing phase III clinical trial will further investigate this drug combination.

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Medical News Today | Nov 5, 2013

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