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Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period

Racial Disparities in Cancer Survival Persisted Over 20-Year Period | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Race-based differences in cancer survival have not changed over time, and the disparities among black patients persist independent of treatment and disease stage, study results showed.


"Ayal A. Aizer, MD, MHS, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues used the SEER database to identify 2.7 million patients diagnosed with lung, breast, prostate or colorectal cancers between 1988 and 2007. The final analysis included more than 1 million patients."

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Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

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Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 2, 2014 7:19 PM

Healio  |  Apr 2, 2014

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Long or Ultralong Cigarettes Increase Lung Cancer Risk

Long or Ultralong Cigarettes Increase Lung Cancer Risk | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Smokers of long or ultralong cigarettes are at greater risk for lung and oral cancer than smokers of regular and king-size cigarettes, a recent study determined. Researchers analyzed urine tests from over 3,500 smokers and found that those who smoked long or ultralong cigarettes had higher levels of tobacco-related carcinogens (cancer-causing substances). Female, black, and older smokers were more likely to smoke long or ultralong cigarettes.

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Medical Xpress | Oct 28, 2013

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Foreign-Born Hispanic Lung Cancer Patients Have Higher Survival Rates

Hispanic lung cancer patients have higher survival rates than their non-Hispanic white (NHW) counterparts, even though they are more likely to be diagnosed at advanced disease stages and less likely to receive treatment. A study of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found that foreign-born Hispanic patients had a lower risk of dying from the disease than both NHW and U.S.-born Hispanic patients with the same diagnosis. The survival advantage of foreign-born over U.S.-born Hispanic patients was especially pronounced in low-income and/or mostly Hispanic neighborhoods. The reasons for this pattern are unclear, but may include community social support, differences in diet and/or smoking rates, or the fact that healthier individuals are more likely to migrate to another country.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology | Aug 19, 2013

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Cancer Survivors' Lifestyles Put Them at Risk for Heart Disease

Cancer Survivors' Lifestyles Put Them at Risk for Heart Disease | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that cancer survivors are at greater risk for heart disease, highlighting the need for incorporating lifestyle changes into their continuing care. In a self-reported survey, the researchers found that 1,582 people who had survived cancer (breast, colorectal, gynecologic, or prostate) also had more risk factors for cardiovascular disease including smoking, high body mass index, physical inactivity, hypertension, and diabetes. Hispanic and black survivors had more of these risk factors than white survivors. In addition, nearly one-third of those surveyed said that their health care provider had not suggested reducing their risk of heart disease by, for example, exercising and losing weight.

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Medical News Today│Apr 18, 2013

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Gilotrif Shows Effectiveness in Various Patient Populations with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

Afatinib (Gilotrif) is a new lung cancer drug for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene. The LUX-Lung 3 clinical trial demonstrated that Gilotrif is superior to chemotherapy as first-line treatment in a global population of patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC. The LUX-Lung 6 trial confirmed these findings specifically in an Asian population; Asia has a three times higher rate of EGFR-mutant NSCLC than Western countries. More recent evidence indicates that Gilotrif is as effective in patients with rare EGFR mutations as it is in those with common mutations. Finally, Gilotrif recently showed effectiveness in NSCLC patients whose cancer had spread to the brain.

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Moneylife | Oct 28, 2013

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Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults

Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A UK survey found that older individuals who use the Internet are more likely to engage in cancer-preventive behaviors. Adults aged 50 years and older who were regular Internet users were 50% more likely to get screened for colorectal cancer than non-users. They were also more physically active, smoked less, and ate more fruits and vegetables. Younger, wealthier, and more educated respondents were more likely to use the Internet, and fewer women and non-white survey participants used the Internet. However, the link between Internet use and cancer-preventive behaviors remained even after controlling for these factors. Given the apparent beneficial influence of Internet use on cancer outcomes, the survey’s authors urge policymakers to promote better Internet access for currently underserved demographics.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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Cancer Patients Want to Be More Involved in Treatment Decisions

Cancer Patients Want to Be More Involved in Treatment Decisions | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Some cancer patients feel that they do not have enough say in their treatment decisions, a recent survey from the UK reveals. While 70% of respondents felt satisfied with their level of involvement, patients with certain rarer cancer types expressed a wish for more participation in treatment decisions, including those with rectal, ovarian, multiple myeloma, and bladder cancers. The desire for greater involvement was also more common in younger patients and ethnic minorities. While the survey was performed in the UK, similar issues are likely to affect patients in other countries, including the U.S. Several U.S. states have recently introduced legislation to support shared medical decision-making.

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Medical Xpress | Aug 6, 2013

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Medical Xpress | Aug 6, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 8, 2013 12:56 PM

Medical Xpress | Aug 6, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 8, 2013 12:56 PM

Medical Xpress | Aug 6, 2013

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Residential Segregation Associated with Higher Rates of Lung Cancer Death for Black Patients

A recent study revealed that residential segregation is tied to increased rates of death from lung cancer for black U.S. Americans, even after controlling for socioeconomic status and smoking rates. For black patients, rates of death from lung cancer increase with higher levels of racial segregation in their county of residence, while for white patients lung cancer mortality rates are lower in more segregated regions. The study’s authors suggest that public health initiatives aimed at reducing lung cancer deaths should be prioritized in highly segregated areas.


Primary source: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1558105#qundefined

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MedPage Today | Jan 16, 2013

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