Lung Cancer Dispatch
4.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Targeted Drugs May Offer Treatment for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

New Targeted Drugs May Offer Treatment for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Abnormalities in the KRAS gene are the most common mutations in lung cancer, especially in lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, no effective targeted therapy directed at KRAS has been found. Instead, researchers have begun to focus on blocking molecules 'downstream' in the chain of chemical reactions through which KRAS affects the cell. Two such molecules are TBK1 and MEK. A recent study found that the drug CYT387 blocks TBK1. CYT387 reduced tumor growth in mice with KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma. Also in mice, CYT387 and the MEK inhibitor AZD6244, given together, shrank aggressive lung tumors with mutations in both the KRAS and the TP53 gene. Researchers now hope to investigate the two drugs in people.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post  |  Jan 29, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

E-Cigarette Vapor Promotes Cancer-Like Transformations of Airway Cells with Predisposing Mutations

E-Cigarette Vapor Promotes Cancer-Like Transformations of Airway Cells with Predisposing Mutations | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

E-cigarettes (electronic cigarettes that use a battery-powered system to deliver nicotine without producing smoke) are advertised as a safer alternative to tobacco cigarettes. However, very few studies have investigated how e-cigarettes affect lung function and lung cancer risk. Researchers examined human airway cells with mutations in the TP53 and KRAS genes, which are often mutated in the airways of current or former smokers at high risk of lung cancer. When the cells were exposed to e-cigarette vapor, they developed cancer-cell-like behaviors and gene expression changes very similar to what was seen when these cells were exposed to tobacco smoke. E-cigarettes may increase the risk of developing lung cancer in high-risk people, including current and former tobacco smokers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post  |  Jan 8, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Blocking a Cell Survival Mechanism May 'Defuse' Lung Cancer

A new study suggests that blocking a cell survival mechanism may render lung cancer tumors less deadly. To provide energy for their rapid multiplication, cancer cells digest some of their own internal parts in a process called autophagy (literally 'self-eating'). Autophagy also clears away old, damaged cell components. When scientists blocked autophagy in a mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the cancer cells accumulated defective cell structures and turned from aggressive lung cancer tumors into oncocytomas, a more easily-controlled tumor type that usually does not spread to other parts of the body. Inhibiting autophagy also activated the so-called 'tumor suppressor gene' p53, which halts tumor growth. Autophagy may present a promising target in lung cancer treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Jul 1, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Antioxidants May Actually Speed Lung Cancer Growth in Some Cases

Antioxidants May Actually Speed Lung Cancer Growth in Some Cases | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Antioxidants are chemicals that neutralize particles called free radicals that can damage DNA. Preventing such damage may help lower cancer risk for some people. However, tumors themselves can contain high levels of free radicals; by eliminating these free radicals, antioxidants may help cancer cells grow. In a laboratory, lung cancer cells treated with the antioxidants vitamin E and acetylcysteine (ACC) multiplied faster than untreated cells. Vitamin E and ACC also increased tumor growth and decreased survival time in mice with lung cancer. The so-called 'tumor suppressor' protein p53 can sense certain free radicals to detect cells with DNA damage and stop their growth. Antioxidants may interfere with this cancer-suppressing mechanism by reducing free radical levels. Taking antioxidants may therefore not be recommended for lung cancer patients and smokers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jan 29, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer Is Associated With 'Aged' Immune Cells

As cells age, they eventually stop multiplying, a state known as 'senescence.' Accumulation of senescent cells is thought to contribute to the symptoms of aging. A study examining T cells, a type of immune cell, found that lung cancer patients had more senescent T cells, much like healthy patients during aging. T cells from both aged individuals and lung cancer patients had increased levels of senescence-promoting proteins and lower levels of proteins that promote continued cell multiplication. This 'artificial aging' of immune cells may weaken the immune system’s ability to attack the cancer. The study’s authors suggest that treatments to ward off senescence in immune cells may in the future help avoid the weakening of the immune system seen in cancer and other aging-related diseases.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Journal of Clinical Investigation | Nov 15, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Genetic Variation in P53 May Contribute to Lung Cancer Risk

A study of individuals with and without lung cancer in North India found that those carrying a particular version (or “polymorphism”) of a gene for the protein p53 were more likely to have lung cancer, independent of their age or smoking rate. P53 belongs to a class of proteins called “tumor suppressor proteins,” and is involved in DNA repair, regulating cell growth, and inducing cell death in damaged or abnormal cells. The findings suggest that this version of the p53 gene, called Arg72Pro, may contribute to higher susceptibility for lung cancer, at least in the North Indian population.


Research paper: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/dna.2012.1792

Cancer Commons's insight:

DNA and Cell Biology | Jan 14, 2013

more...
No comment yet.