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Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates? | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.


"Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ."

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer

Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A study of Italians who consume a diet rich in resveratrol -- the compound found in red wine, dark chocolate and berries -- finds they live no longer than and are just as likely to develop cardiovascular disease or cancer as those who eat or drink smaller amounts of the antioxidant."

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.


"Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford's Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman's overall risk of cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Three Metastasis Myths, Debunked

Three Metastasis Myths, Debunked | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Persistent rumors claim that a needle biopsy–a procedure in which a surgeon removes a small part of a suspected tumor using a needle–can cause cancer to spread. However, there is no evidence that this is the case. On the contrary, biopsies often allow early diagnosis and timely treatment of cancers. Likewise, there is no evidence that massage promotes cancer spread. Indeed, massage therapy for cancer patients can reduce pain, muscle tension, mental stress, and nausea. Cancer spread is driven by biological changes inside the cancer cells, not outside mechanical forces like a biopsy needle or a massage. Finally, sugar does not 'feed' cancer. Excess sugar consumption can contribute to obesity, which is associated with increased risk of several cancers, but by itself, sugar does not have any effect on cancer spread.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 25, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 25, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 25, 2013

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Online Dietary Recommendations For Cancer Patients Are Inconsistent

Online Dietary Recommendations For Cancer Patients Are Inconsistent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Dietary guidelines for cancer patients on the websites of even high-quality cancer treatment centers are inconsistent and contradictory, a recent survey showed. Of 21 institutions surveyed, only a minority provide their own online nutritional recommendations; the rest either link to external websites or provide no guidance at all. Half of the websites recommend a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, while the other half recommend equal amounts of fat and carbohydrates. Several specific foods are recommended on some websites, but discouraged on others. Many of the guidelines are aimed at avoiding weight loss; however, weight loss is a significant risk only in some cancer types and obesity is associated with poor outcomes in other cancer types. The survey underlines the need for studies leading to consistent, cancer-type-specific nutritional guidelines for cancer patients. Research paper: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2013.757629

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Medical News Today | Mar 28, 2013

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Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System

Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results of a new study on mice and a phase 1 trial of humans suggest that prolonged cycles of fasting - for 2-4 days at a time - not only protect against toxic effects of chemotherapy, but also trigger stem cell regeneration of new immune cells and clearing out of old, damaged cells.


"The study, by researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and published in the journalCell Stem Cell, is the first to show that a natural intervention can trigger regeneration of an organ or system through stem cells.


"The team believes the findings could benefit people with immune system damage, for example if they have received chemotherapy treatment for cancer. It could also benefit the elderly whose immune systems are weakened through aging, making them more susceptible to disease."

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 7, 10:13 AM

Intuitively this week, my body felt like it needed to fast.  Intuitively, even thought I'd only planned a two day juice fast, it turned into four.  With the right plan for fasting, and doctor's supervision as needed depending on your state of health or knowledge about how to fast correctly, it is highly doable.  

 

I use a company that specializes in juicing and provides a whole kit of raw juices designed to give me different nutrients at different times of the day and it's all organic.  I was never hungry and only had one afternoon dealing with a detox headache from going off caffeine. The rest of the time I was completely energized.  Returning to food now, my body is craving raw vegetables and has no desire for caffeine or some of the other nutritional "slips" into foods that aren't healthy for me.

 

Amazing to see more natural paths to healing being embraced by the medical community.  Medical interventions are sometimes very necessary and so I am grateful that we have them.  It's not an either/or...it's an and - how can more "traditional" medical approaches and some natural approaches work together for best outcomes...that's an exciting place to be.

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An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

An Apple a Day, and Other Myths | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of 'superfoods,' rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.


"But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string."

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer

No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A review by a panel of independent U.S. experts concludes that there is not enough evidence to recommend either for or against the use of most vitamin or mineral supplements to reduce the risk of cancer. However, the panel’s guidelines advise against the use of beta-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A) and vitamin E for cancer prevention, because there is relatively clear evidence that neither is effective. Indeed, beta-carotene supplements appear to increase lung cancer risk in people already at high risk of the disease. Instead, the panel recommends that healthy adults without nutritional deficiencies get their nutrients by eating a varied diet to minimize the risk of chronic disease, including cancer.

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults

Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A UK survey found that older individuals who use the Internet are more likely to engage in cancer-preventive behaviors. Adults aged 50 years and older who were regular Internet users were 50% more likely to get screened for colorectal cancer than non-users. They were also more physically active, smoked less, and ate more fruits and vegetables. Younger, wealthier, and more educated respondents were more likely to use the Internet, and fewer women and non-white survey participants used the Internet. However, the link between Internet use and cancer-preventive behaviors remained even after controlling for these factors. Given the apparent beneficial influence of Internet use on cancer outcomes, the survey’s authors urge policymakers to promote better Internet access for currently underserved demographics.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013