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Surgical Biopsy Proves Safe for Selected Late-Stage Lung Cancer Patients

Surgical Biopsy Proves Safe for Selected Late-Stage Lung Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers at UC Davis have determined that surgical biopsies can be safely performed on select patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer, which should enhance their access to drugs that target specific genetic mutations such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).


"The findings, published in the July issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, address a common problem in treatment for advanced lung cancer: insufficient tumor tissue available for molecular analysis, which is required before prescribing targeted therapy."


Editor's note: Surgical biopsies (removal of a small sample of a tumor) are used by doctors to figure out if a patient's tumor has certain genetic mutations. A tumor's genetic mutations can help determine which treatments are most likely to work. Some doctors are reluctant to take surgical biopsies from patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because of concerns that dangerous complications will arise. But a new study found that, with careful expert review and good surgical approaches, certain late-stage patients can safely have surgical biopsies.

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UC Davis  |  Jun 26, 2014

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Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC

Poor Baseline QOL Failed to Predict Worse Outcomes in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Poor baseline quality-of-life scores did not predict worse survival outcomes among patients undergoing non–small cell lung cancer surgery who were at high risk for adverse events.


"In a randomized, multicenter trial, Hiran C. Fernando, MD, chief of the division of thoracic surgery at Boston Medical Center, evaluated 212 patients with NSCLC who were randomly assigned to undergo sublobar resection or sublobar resection with brachytherapy."


Editor's note: This story describes a study that tracked the quality of life of volunteers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were undergoing surgery to remove their tumors and who were at high risk for harmful side effects of the surgery. The study aimed to determine if low quality of life before surgery was linked with worse outcomes of the surgery. Contrary to previous studies, this study found that poor quality of life did not predict poor surgical outcomes.

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Healio  |  Jun 24, 2014

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Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC

Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The addition of ramucirumab to docetaxel improved outcomes over placebo with docetaxel as a second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to results of the REVEL trial presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago.


“ 'Despite advancements in genomics and identification of predictive biomarkers such as EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangement, there is still no… targeted therapy for the majority of patients with squamous and non-squamous carcinoma,' said Maurice Pérol, MD, of the Cancer Research Center of Lyon in France. Ramucirumab specifically targets VEGFR-2 and inhibits angiogenesis, and it has been shown to improve outcomes in gastric cancer as monotherapy."


Editor's note: This article describes a treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that combines a new targeted drug called ramucirumab with the standard chemotherapy drug docetaxel. In a clinical trial to test the treatment in volunteer patients who had already received one previous treatment, it was found that ramucirumab plus docetaxel provided better patient outcomes than docetaxel plus a placebo.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 19, 2014

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Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm

Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the first phase III trial assessing the combination of an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced nonadenocarcinoma non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the addition of the fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody figitumumab to paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve overall survival over chemotherapy alone. The study, reported by Langer et al in Journal of Clinical Oncology, was stopped early due to futility and an increased frequency of serious adverse events, including treatment-related death, in patients receiving figitumumab."


Editor's note: In a clinical trial with volunteer patients, a new drug called figitumumab did not show any benefits over standard chemotherapy. The clinical trial was stopped earlier than scheduled because of serious side effects of fogitumumab, including, for some patients, death.

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The ASCO Post  |  Jun 12, 2014

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Survey Sheds Light on Common Clinical Practice for Incompletely Resected Lung Cancer

"A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumour has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) says.

"Jean Yves Douillard, from the ICO Institut de Cancerologie de l'Ouest René Gauducheau, France, Chair of the ESMO Educational Committee, was commenting on a paper published in the journal Lung Cancer. In the study, researchers led by Raffaele Califano of The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK, surveyed 768 oncologists from 41 European countries about the treatments they offered patients who had 'R1 resected' non-small-cell lung cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 10, 2014

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ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival

ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab modestly improved survival in squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a pivotal trial, but many called the effect too small to count.


"Adding the drug to a standard chemotherapy regimen improved overall survival by 16% (P=0.012), Nick Thatcher, MD, of Christie Hospital in Manchester, England, and colleagues found in the SQUIRE trial.


"While only about a 6-week gain over chemotherapy alone (median 11.5 versus 9.9 months), Thatcher called the findings an important advance."


Editor's note: Necitumumab is a drug that may hold promise for some patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial to test the drug on volunteer patients, researchers found that necitumumab can increase survival by 6 weeks, compared to standard chemotherapy treatment. Some researchers say a 6 week increase in survival time is not terribly meaningful, and may be setting the bar too low for treatment of squamous NSCLC.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Xcovery Presents Interim Phase 1 Results of X-396 in ALK positive
NSCLC at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting

Xcovery Presents Interim Phase 1 Results of X-396 in ALK positive <br/>      NSCLC at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Xcovery , a developer of next-generation targeted therapeutics for cancer, today presented preliminary results at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) from a phase 1 study of X-396, a potent small molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, that showed X-396 is well tolerated and has antitumor activity in patients with ALK positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new targeted drug called X-396. The drug is meant to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing. A clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients found promising results for X-396. It appeared to benefit patients whether or not they had previously taken and grown resistant to crizotinib, another ALK-targeted drug.

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MarketWatch  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Cyramza Yields a Modest Survival Benefit in Second-line NSCLC

"Cyramza™ (ramucirumab, IMC-1121B; Eli Lilly) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of VEGFR-2. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. On February 19, 2014, Lilly announced via press release that the REVEL trial was positive for both overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III REVEL trial (NCT01168973) were reported at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The trial evaluated docetaxel with or without Cyramza in squamous or non-squamous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following disease progression after one prior platinum-based therapy."


Editor's note: A new targeted drug called Cyramza (aka ramucirumab) shows promise as a potential treatment for people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial, scientists tested the drug on volunteer patients with stage IV NSCLC. Compared to standard chemotherapy alone, patients who were treated with chemo plus Cyramza lived longer and had more time pass before their cancer worsened.

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OBR  |  Jun 3, 2014

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MEDIA ALERT New Data Show Giotrif® (Afatinib) Provided More than One Year Additional Survival for Lung Cancer Patients with the Most Common Type of EGFR Mutation (del19) Compared to Chemotherapy

"Boehringer Ingelheim today announced results of the pre-specified individual, as well as the exploratory combined, analyses of two Phase III trials (LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6). These data, to be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), demonstrated for the first time that patients with NSCLC with the most common epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (exon 19 deletions; del19) lived more than one year longer if treated with first-line afatinib compared to chemotherapy."


Editor's note: This article discusses the results of a clinical trial that tested a targeted drug called afatinib (aka Giotrif, or Gilotrif)  on volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial found that patients whose tumors had a particular mutation called del19 in the EGFR gene lived more than one year longer if treated with afatinib than if treated with chemotherapy. EGFR mutations and other mutations are detected via molecular testing, and can be used by oncologists to help develop personalized lung cancer treatment plans.

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Boehringer Ingelheim  |  Jun 2, 2014

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ASCO: Zykadia Works Before or After Targeted Lung Ca Tx

ASCO: Zykadia Works Before or After Targeted Lung Ca Tx | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Ceritinib (Zykadia) produced good response in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) overexpressing ALK, regardless of prior treatment for that target, an early phase trial showed.


Ceritinib was associated with an overall response rate of 55% in patients previously treated with crizotinib (Xalkori) and 66% in those naive to that ALK inhibitor, Dong-Wan Kim, MD, of the Seoul National University Hospital, and colleagues found.

Editor's note: This article is about a drug called ceritinib (brand name Zykadia), which was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Dug Administration (FDA), allowing doctors in the U.S. to prescribe it to patients who 1) have advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 2) have tumor cells with mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing, and 3) have tried treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori) but experienced worsening of their cancer. According to the new research described in this article, ceritinib may actually be beneficial whether or not the patient was previously treated with crizotinib.
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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Ignyta Announces Interim Data from RXDX-101 Phase I Clinical Trial (NASDAQ:RXDX)

"Ignyta, Inc. (Nasdaq: RXDX), an oncology precision medicine biotechnology company, announced today that interim results from the first-in-human ALKA-372-001 Phase I clinical trial of RXDX-101, the company's proprietary oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting solid tumor indications, were presented in an oral presentation at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology(ASCO) in Chicago, Illinois."


Editor's note: This story is about a new drug called RXDX-101. In a clinical trial testing it in volunteer patients, it showed promise for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors had mutations in the ALK gene, and another patient with NSCLC whose tumor had a mutation in the ROS1 gene (these mutations can be detected by molecular testing).

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Ignyta  |  May 31, 2014

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ARIAD Presents Updated Phase 1/2 Data on AP26113 in Patients with ALK+ Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

ARIAD Presents Updated Phase 1/2 Data on AP26113 in Patients with ALK+ Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced updated clinical results on its investigational tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), AP26113, in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from an ongoing Phase 1/2 trial. These study results show anti-tumor activity of AP26113 in patients with crizotinib-resistant anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC, including patients with brain metastases. Crizotinib is approved for ALK-positive NSCLC patients."


Editor's note: This story is about a targeted drug called AP26113, which may benefit some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it has shown promise for those patients whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing, and who have already been treated with the drug crizotinib (Xalkori) but have grown resistant to it.

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MarketWatch  |  May 31, 2014

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Prevalence of New Genetic Driver in Lung Cancer Shown in Study

Prevalence of New Genetic Driver in Lung Cancer Shown in Study | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A line has been drawn from mutation of the gene NTRK1, to its role as an oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, to treatment that targets this mutation. 'Everything we know about lung cancer points to the idea that when we find one of these genetic drivers and can target it with a drug, patients will respond and tend to have a good amount of time on drug before it becomes ineffective. Obviously we can't guarantee the effectiveness of targeting the NTRK1 mutation at this point, but everything we know about these kinds of genes makes us extremely hopeful,' says one researcher."


Editor's note: A new targeted therapy treatment may be on the horizon for some lung cancer patients. Targeted therapies work by targeting specific molecules inside cancer cells. Often, these molecules are proteins that are mutated and cause cancer cells to multiply rapidly, contributing to tumor growth. There are several mutated proteins commonly found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. For a given patient, these can be detected by molecular testing, and based on the results, doctors can prescribe certain targeted therapy drugs. A newly discovered mutation called NTRK1 is being explored as a potential target for a new targeted therapy. To test the new drug, called LOXO-101, scientists have started a new clinical trial and are enrolling patients whose tumors have NTRK1 mutations.

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ScienceDaily  |  May 31, 2014

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Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients

Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Clovis Oncology has launched the TIGER2 study for its non-small cell lung cancer drug CO-1686, an agent the company is studying as a treatment for advanced patients with tumors characterized by EGFR mutations and the T790M resistance mutation.


"CO-1686 is an irreversible EGFR inhibitor. Clovis this week said it has dosed the first patient in the TIGER2 Phase I/II trial, which is focused on gauging the efficacy of CO-1686 in NSCLC patients who have progressed on their first and only anti-EGFR treatment."

Editor's note: Some people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have tumor cells with mutations in the EGFR gene (oncologists often use a tumor biopsy to check for this mutation in a patient). These patients can be treated with targeted drugs known as EGFR inhibitors. EGFR inhibitors can shrink tumors at first, but over time, tumors may become resistant to the drugs and start growing again. Often, this is because of a new, additional mutation that occurs in the EGFR gene called T790M. A new clinical trial is enrolling volunteer patients with the T790M mutation to test a new drug meant to overcome EGFR inhibitor resistance. The drug is called CO1-686.
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Pharmacogenomics Reporter  |  Jun 25, 2014

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General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The presence of a six-gene profile in the microRNA of patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts reduced survival likelihood after first-line treatment with targeted therapy followed by chemotherapy for disease progression, indicate research results.


"While the findings 'should be further validated', the researchers believe their analysis 'supports the hypothesis that circulating [microRNA's] may further be developed as predictive markers for EGFR-targeted treatment' in an NSCLC population whose response to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors is unknown."


Editor's note: This story describes a new, blood test-based method by which oncologists may be able to predict the effects of targeted therapy treatment on the survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it may be able to predict the effects of first-line treatment with drugs known as EGFR inhibitors, which are prescribed to people whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In a study with volunteer patients, scientists took blood samples just before and just after the patients began taking the drugs bevacizumab or erlotinib. The scientists identified six different kinds of a molecule called microRNA that, if present, were associated with a lower chance of survival (29 months versus more than 45 months). More testing will be needed to determine if this six-gene signature can be used widely; it would be a non-invasive alternative to making predictions and monitoring treatment effectiveness using repeat tumor biopsies.

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medwireNews  |  June 20, 2014

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General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results from the DELTA trial indicate no significant differences in progression-free (PF) or overall survival (OS) after treatment with docetaxel versus erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients unselected for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status.


"By contrast, in the subgroup of patients whose tumours were positive for EGFR mutations, PFS and OS were nonsignificantly longer in the erlotinib than the docetaxel group, whereas in those with wild-type tumours, docetaxel was significantly superior to erlotinib in terms of PFS, observe the researchers in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Editor's note: This story discusses the results of a clinical trial comparing the targeted drug erlotinib (aka Tarceva) with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel in volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the trial, patients whose tumors had mutations in the EGFR gene benefitted more from erlotinib than docetaxel, while patients without EGFR mutations (as detected by molecular testing) had better results from docetaxel.

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medwireNews  |  Jun 13, 2014

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At ASCO, Next-Gen EGFR Inhibitors Show Early Promise in Lung Cancer Patients with T790M Mutations

"Next-generation EGFR inhibitors for treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who have acquired resistance to first-generation drugs in this class accurately hit mutant EGFR tumor cells and caused fewer serious side effects, early data presented at a major cancer conference showed.


"Researchers at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting here this week, presented preliminary data from human studies on three next-generation EGFR inhibitors: AstraZeneca's AZD9291, Clovis Oncology's CO-1686, and Hanmi Pharmaceutical's HM61713. All three agents showed promising activity against patients who had EGFR mutations, had received prior treatment with a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor – such as Roche's Tarceva (erlotinib) and AstraZeneca's Iressa (gefinitib) – and had T790M mutations."


Editor's note: For a more reader-friendly explanation of these new drugs, check out the "Drug resistance" section of our Chief Scientist's latest blog post.

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GenomeWeb  |  Jun 4, 2014

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Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests

Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Up to 40 percent of lung cancer patients do not respond to a targeted therapy designed to block tumor growth—a puzzling clinical setback that researchers have long tried to solve. Now, scientists at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute have discovered why that intrinsic resistance occurs—and they pinpoint a drug they say could potentially reverse it."


"Their findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that over-expression of the growth protein Cripto-1 makes lung cancer cells resistant to the drug erlotinib (Tarceva®). Experiments in cell lines and in animals demonstrated that blocking Cripto-1 signaling transduction restored sensitivity to the drug, one of a number of EGFR inhibitors used in non-small cell lung carcinoma and other cancers."


Editor's note: Lung cancer patients who try the targeted therapy drug erlotinib (brand name Tarceva) may be intrinsically resistant to it; it has no effect on their tumor growth. Researchers have now found that abnormalities involving a gene called Cripto-1 can make a tumor resistant to Tarceva, and that drugs that block Cripto-1's role in tumor cells can restore sensitivity to Tarceva. These studies were done on human cancer cells in the lab and in animals, but a new clinical trial with volunteer patients will test whether a drug called AZD0424 might undo Tarceva resistance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), allowing them to benefit from Tarceva treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 9, 2014

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Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings

Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers with UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Centerreport that two new experimental drugs have shown great promise in the treatment of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, which accounts for about 85 percent of all lung cancers. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.


"The drugs—ramucirumab and CO-1868—were shown in separate clinical trials to increase survival times with fewer toxic side effects than standard treatments. The findings were presented this week at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago."


Editor's note: For more on the ramucirumab findings, see our previous news post. To learn more about targeted therapies like CO-1686 and ramucirumab, visit our lung cancer Basics.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Astrazeneca’s Medimmune Presents Encouraging Immunotherapy Data at ASCO 2014

"MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, presented results today from its novel investigational immunotherapy portfolio, focusing on MEDI4736, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2014 Annual Meeting.  Overall, studies demonstrated durable clinical activity and tolerability for MEDI4736 across a range of tumor types.


"This announcement follows the recent progression of the first Phase III study for MEDI4736, an investigational, engineered, human monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Signals from PD-L1 help tumors avoid detection by the immune system. It is believed that by targeting PD-L1, MEDI4736 may block this ligand from sending out signals to T-cells to ‘ignore’ tumor cells, thereby countering cancer’s immune-evading tactics.


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments that boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer are a promising area of cancer research. A new immunotherapy drug called MEDI4736 is being tested in volunteer patients with different cancer types, and has shown good results for some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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MedImmune  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Immunomedics Announces Objective Responses in Five Types of Solid Cancer With IMMU-132

"Immunomedics, Inc., (Nasdaq:IMMU) today reported that 71% of patients (34 of 48) with diverse metastatic solid cancers had durable disease stabilization after receiving treatments with the Company's novel investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), IMMU-132. These include 7 patients (15%) with colorectal, small-cell and non-small-cell lung, esophageal, and triple-negative breast cancers showing partial responses with tumor shrinkage of 30% or more as measured by computed tomography (CT)."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new cancer drug called IMMU-132, which may work in a variety of cancer types. IMMU-132 is an immunotherapy, meaning it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients found promising results, including in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

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NASDAQ  |  Jun 2, 2014

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ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.


"Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found."


Editor's note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful

New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Drugs that unleash the body’s immune system to combat tumors could allow patients with advanced melanoma to live far longer than ever before, researchers gathered at the nation’s largest cancer conference say.

“ 'It’s a completely different world for patients with metastatic melanoma, to talk about the majority of patients being alive for years rather than weeks or months,' said Dr. Jedd D. Wolchok, a melanoma specialist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, interviewed at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here."

Editor's note: This is a good exploration of immunotherapy treatments for melanoma; immunotherapy for lung cancer is also discussed.

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The New York Times  |  Jun 2, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Jun 2, 2014

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AVEO Oncology Announces Presentation of AV-203 Phase 1 Results at 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting

"AVEO Oncology (NASDAQ:AVEO) today announced the presentation of results from a first-in-human Phase 1 study of AV-203, AVEO’s ErbB3 (HER3) inhibitory antibody candidate. Among the results, the study established a recommended Phase 2 dose of AV-203, demonstrated good tolerability and promising early signs of activity, and reached the maximum planned dose of AV-203 monotherapy. The results were presented in a poster, entitled “First-in-human Phase 1 dose-escalation study of AV-203, a monoclonal antibody against ErbB3 in patients with metastatic or advanced solid tumors” (Abstract #11113, Poster #395, S Hall A2), at the Tumor Biology General Poster Session of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2014 Annual Meeting, taking place May 30 - June 3, 2014, in Chicago."


Editor's note: This story is about a promising new drug called AV-203. In a clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients, AV-203 showed promise for treating several cancer types, including lung cancer.

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AVEO Oncology  |  May 31, 2014

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Studies Reveal Potential New Targeted Therapies for Common, Hard-to-Treat Cancers

Studies Reveal Potential New Targeted Therapies for Common, Hard-to-Treat Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Positive results from four clinical trials of investigational targeted drugs for advanced ovarian, lung, and thyroid cancers, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia were highlighted today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Findings from the mid- and late-stage trials suggest new ways to slow disease progression and improve survival for patients who experience relapses or resistance to available treatments...


"Second-line treatment with ramucirumab plus standard docetaxel extends survival for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: This phase III clinical trial marks the first time in a decade that a survival benefit has been achieved in second-line therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer – findings that could impact the care of 60,000 patients each year in the United States."


Editor's note: Learn more about targeted therapy drugs for lung cancer.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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